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Videos uploaded by user “FuseSchool - Global Education”
What are Quarks? | Physics | The Fuse School
 
03:18
Find out what quarks are, how they were discovered and why they are very important in relation to protons and neutrons. There are different types of quarks which you'll learn about in this GCSE / K12 "Radioactivity" video from the Virtual School. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What Is Eutrophication | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
01:55
What happens when fertilisers get washed into lakes and rivers? A process called eutrophication. Learn all about it in this video. 00:00:00,720 -- 00:00:02,720 Eutrophication is the process 00:00:02,720 -- 00:00:03,800 that can happen in a water body, 00:00:03,800 -- 00:00:05,800 like a river or a lake, 00:00:05,920 -- 00:00:09,780 when too many nutrients are added to the system. 00:00:09,920 -- 00:00:12,420 Eutrophication starts with fertilisers, which are rich in 00:00:12,500 -- 00:00:14,500 nutrients like nitrate and phosphate, 00:00:14,500 -- 00:00:16,320 are washed into the river or lake system. 00:00:16,940 -- 00:00:19,920 This leads to an increase in nutrient concentrations in the water. 00:00:22,740 -- 00:00:24,740 The nutrients are food for algae. 00:00:25,040 -- 00:00:27,040 The algae grow and reproduce quickly, 00:00:27,220 -- 00:00:29,220 forming a thick green bloom in the water. 00:00:31,400 --00:00:34,640 This algal bloom will absorb sunlight shining on the water 00:00:35,040 -- 00:00:37,040 so the sunlight can't reach the bottom. 00:00:37,500 -- 00:00:40,160 Plants who need this light to photosynthesis will die. 00:00:41,180 -- 00:00:43,180 The algae will also start to die when 00:00:43,180 -- 00:00:44,340 they eat up all of the nutrients 00:00:44,340 -- 00:00:46,020 and run out of food. 00:00:46,740 -- 00:00:48,340 Next, 00:00:48,520 -- 00:00:51,520 bacteria start to breakdown the dead plants and algae. 00:00:51,520 -- 00:00:53,040 That releases more nutrients 00:00:53,040 -- 00:00:54,560 back into the water 00:00:54,560 -- 00:00:56,380 continuing the Algal Bloom Cycle. 00:00:59,800 -- 00:01:02,880 The bacteria, with a continuing supply of food, 00:01:03,280 -- 00:01:05,280 reproduce into much larger numbers 00:01:05,660 -- 00:01:08,180 consuming oxygen as they grow and respire. 00:01:09,380 -- 00:01:11,380 There is not much oxygen in the water to begin with 00:01:12,080 -- 00:01:14,080 so when the bacteria consume it quickly 00:01:14,080 -- 00:01:15,540 it might run out completely. 00:01:16,020 -- 00:01:19,040 Water without oxygen is called Anoxic. 00:01:19,320 -- 00:01:21,320 If the water turns anoxic 00:01:21,580 -- 00:01:23,860 all non-bacterial life in the water, 00:01:24,040 -- 00:01:27,800 including fish and other animals, will die. 00:01:28,560 -- 00:01:29,100 So, 00:01:29,660 -- 00:01:32,960 eutrophication happens when nutrients are added to water 00:01:32,960 -- 00:01:34,640 which causes an algal bloom, 00:01:34,860 -- 00:01:37,420 cutting off sunlight and feeding bacteria. 00:01:37,780 -- 00:01:39,780 The bacteria use up oxygen in the water 00:01:39,780 -- 00:01:41,300 which becomes an anoxic, 00:01:41,440 -- 00:01:43,780 causing everything living in the water to die. 00:01:44,520 -- 00:01:47,240 Eutrophication is one reason why we need to be careful 00:01:47,540 -- 00:01:49,540 with fertilisers when we are growing crops. This is part of our sciences pilot for the virtual school. We would appreciate any comments or feedback. Want to learn more? Visit: http://www.thevirtualschool.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/virtualschooluk Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/virtualschooluk Our channel: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Exact Trig Values - Hand Trick | Trigonometry | Maths | FuseSchool
 
04:08
There are some key angles that have exact values in trigonometry. The ones we need to know are 0, 30, 45, 60 and 90. In this video we will discover one method of remember what these values are - by counting fingers on our hand! In the first part we discovered a different method (constructing a table) which you may prefer. Choose whichever method works best for you. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Transport in Cells: Active Transport | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:32
In the first part of this video we looked at diffusion to move gases and osmosis for the movement of water, from high concentration to low concentration down their concentration gradient. Active transport works in the opposite direction; it moves molecules from a low concentration to a high concentration, against the concentration gradient. This is the opposite of diffusion and osmosis. And because it is not the natural direction, energy from is required to make this work. Active transport is carried out by protein carriers. The protein carriers are within the cell membrane and they have a specific binding site for the exact molecule they are transporting. The substance binds to the protein carrier on the side that it is at low concentration. And using energy from respiration, the protein carrier releases the substance on the other side of the membrane - where it is already at a higher concentration. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Le Chatelier's Principle Part 1 | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:15
What exactly is Le Chatelier's Principle? And why is it important to learn it to understand chemical reactions? Find out in this video! Part 2 found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhQ02egUs5Y& At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are Emulsions? | Chemistry | FuseSchool
 
03:08
Learn all about emulsions, how they are made and where we can find them in everyday life. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Monoclonal Antibodies | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
03:57
Antibodies are the warriors inside our body. They are part of our immune system, recognising and fighting against bad foreign invaders, called antigens. Antibodies can bind to a broad range of antigens, and are produced by cells of the immune system, known as B-cells. To learn more about antibodies and antigens, watch this video. Antibodies can be used for medical and diagnostic applications, in the form of monoclonal antibodies. So, what are monoclonal antibodies? The word monoclonal means a single clone. Monoclonal antibodies are identical antibodies produced in laboratories from a single clone of immune cells. The cloned immune cells are genetically completely identical. And so the antibodies they produce are also identical to one another. Which is perfect - to work properly, we need large numbers of identical antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies have a high specificity, which means they can recognize and bind to a single antigen binding site. This means they are targeted to a specific antigen, and is a key trait that makes them useful in diagnosing and treating diseases. So how are they produced? Well first off we need an immune system. Which is why we use mice. In a laboratory, a mouse is vaccinated with the target antigen. This stimulates the B-cells, found in the spleen, to produce antibodies against the target antigen. The spleen of the mouse is then removed. The B-cells in the spleen are isolated, and fused with a tumour cell. We need to fuse the antibody-producing b cells with a tumour cell, because the b-cells don’t have the ability to divide. BUT tumours however do divide easily. This fusion cell is called a Hybridoma cell. The hybridoma cells reproduce rapidly to make cloned cells, which all make the same antibody. These monoclonal antibodies are collected and purified, ready for use. They match up perfectly with the target antigens in the body. And are made in huge quantities. Monoclonal antibodies are potentially really exciting, and can be used in a number of ways... I bet you didn’t know antibodies were used in pregnancy tests!! Monoclonal antibodies on the pregnancy test stick bind to the HCG hormone found in the urine of pregnant women causing a colour change. Monoclonal antibodies can target the antigens on cancer cells and be used in a number of ways... Firstly, by combining them with an anti-cancer drug which can then accurately locate and target only the cancer cells or avoiding the healthy cells. Secondly for detection… they can carry special markers which show doctors where the cancerous cells are starting to build up. Thirdly, they can be used to trigger the body’s own immune system to recognise and kill the cancer cells They can also be used to identify other diseases and locate blood clots. So those are a few uses… but are they all good? We’ve seen the positives, so what are some criticisms? They are expensive and time-consuming to produce… they have more side effects than expected; and they are too specific meaning that whilst yes they can diagnose and attack diseases, they only can attack one type each time. A more diverse and adaptable solution would be better. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Fractional Distillation | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:06
In this video learn how fractional distillation separates crude oil into useful fractions, examples of these fractions and where they're used in everyday life. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Hydrocarbon Cracking and Why It Is Done | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
03:50
Learn the basics about the cracking of hydrocarbons and why it is done. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What is Dynamic Equilibrium? | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:19
Learn about dynamic equilibrium, the conditions required for dynamic equilibrium to be reached and examples of systems at equilibrium. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are Ionic Bonds?  | The Chemistry Journey | FuseSchool
 
02:55
In this video you'll learn the basics about Ionic Bonds. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What Is Plasma | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
04:12
Learn the basics about plasma - the fourth state of matter, when learning about properties of matter. When ice is sufficiently heated, it melts to form water. It has therefore undergone a change of state – from a solid to a liquid. Recall that in a solid, all of the particles are closely packed in a fixed position, and therefore has a fixed shape and volume. The particles in a liquid are still touching one another and are able to move around one another, therefore, a liquid still has a fixed volume but takes the shape of their container. Water evaporates from a liquid to a gas. The particles in a gas are further away from one another and take the shape and volume of their container. For certain substances, if we continue to apply heat to their gaseous form, another change of state could occur. These substances can go from a gas to a state of matter called plasma. For this change of state to occur, very strong heat must be applied. When heat is sufficiently strong, the electrons are stripped from their respective atoms, creating free electrons and positive ions. Although there are both negative and positive particles, overall, plasma is neutral as there are equal amounts of oppositely charged particles. Because there are free electrons, substances in a plasma form can conduct electricity. This is what separates a gas from plasma – gases cannot conduct electricity, but plasma can. Naturally occurring plasma include lightning and the Northern lights. Stars also exist in plasma form – in fact stars are just really hot balls of plasma. Plasma can be found in fluorescent light bulbs and neon signs. When an electrical current is passed through the mercury vapour in fluorescent light bulbs and certain noble gases in neon signs, it heats up the gases sufficiently to strip the electrons and create plasma. The technology actually goes even further beyond light bulbs and neon signs. Plasma screen TVs are made possible due to this state of matter. A plasma screen is made of many thousands of tiny dots called pixels, which are made of three fluorescent light electrodes, emitting the colours red, green, and blue. The combination of these colours can give any possible colour, which is why we can see all colours on these screens. The higher the number of pixels, the higher the definition, and the images will appear “sharper” and more detailed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What are metallic bonds? | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:14
Learn the basics about particles in a metal, that are held together by metallic bonds.What are metallic bonds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Xylem and Phloem - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:28
Plants have a transport system to move things around. The xylem moves water and solutes, from the roots to the leaves in a process known as transpiration. The phloem moves glucose and amino acids from the leaves all around the plant, in a process known as translocation. The xylem and phloem are arranged in groups called vascular bundles. The arrangement is slightly different in the roots to the stems. The xylem are made up of dead cells, whereas the phloem is made up of living cells. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is Electrolysis | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
05:11
Learn the basics about electrolysis. Electrolysis is electrical current flow through a liquid which causes chemical changes. The liquid can be a molten ionic compound or aqueous solution. The liquid will contain free-flowing positive ions and negative ions. The positive ions are called cations, and the negative ions are called anions. Electrodes are submerged in the liquid (electrolyte solution) and connected to an electrical cell. The electrons will start to flow in the wires and this will cause one electrode to become positively charged (the anode) and the other negatively charged (the cathode). This has an immediate knock-on effect in the molten liquid, and the ions in it. The positive ions in the liquid (electrolyte) are attracted to the negative electrode (cathode). The negative ions in the liquid (electrolyte), is going to be attracted to the positive electrode (anode). This is because opposite electrical charges attract. When the ions meet the electrodes, electron exchange happens and this triggers a chemical reaction. Remember that electrolysis can also take place in ionic solutions as well as molten compounds. The more concentrated the solution, the greater the ion flow rate. Ion flow rate can also be increased by increasing the potential difference or voltage across the cell. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is the Bronsted Lowry Theory | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:56
Have you ever head of the Bronsted Lowry Theory of acids and bases, an essential theory of Chemistry? It helps you fill the gaps in the Arrhenius theory. This education video by the Virtual School will teach you about: - Testing acids - Dissociation At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What is the Haber Process | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:05
What is the Haber Process, how does it work and where do we use it? In this education video by The Fuse Universal you are going to learn about: - How to conduct the Haber Process - Industrial Process for the Production of Ammonia - Uses of the Haber Process in Industry At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Manufacturing Sulphuric Acid | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:31
Learn the basics about manufacturing sulphuric acid as part of the equilibrium topic within reactions. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Structure of the Leaf | Plant Biology | The Fuse School
 
03:43
Plants make food through photosynthesis. Using their leaves, plants combine sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to make glucose and oxygen. A leaf is like a plant's food factory, collecting all of the components into one place so that photosynthesis can happen. Let's start with sunlight. The top of a leaf is exposed to the most sunlight, and so the cells specialised for trapping light are on top of the leaf. These specialised cells are called palisade mesophyll cells. They are packed full of chlorophyll - the green chemical that plants used to absorb light. Most leaves have a large surface area so that they can trap as much sunlight as possible. Moving onto carbon dioxide. This is where the bottom of the leaf comes in. There are little pores on the bottom of the leaf called stomata. The stomata open up so that carbon dioxide can diffuse into the leaf. The stomata are controlled by 'sausage shaped' guard cells, which open up to let carbon dioxide in. The guard cells can also close the stomata, to stop other things inside the leaf, like water, from escaping. The carbon dioxide comes in from the stomata, and then makes its way up through the leaf, through the gaps in the spongy mesophyll layer in the bottom part of the leaf and heads up to the palisade cells where photosynthesis occurs. Leaves are thin so that the carbon dioxide doesn't have too far to travel. The final reactant needed for photosynthesis is water. Water comes into the plant through the roots, moves up the stem and enters the leaf through the vascular bundle. The vascular bundle contains a hollow tube specifically for water movement called the xylem. The veins on a leaf are actually the vascular bundle, allowing water to be spread out through the leaf. The leaves palisade cells now have sunlight, carbon dioxide and water. They are ready to photosynthesis to make glucose and oxygen. How do leaves manage to let in the wanted things (like water and carbon dioxide) but prevent unwanted things like bacteria getting in and also prevent the reactants from escaping before being used? At the top and bottom of the leaf are epidermis cells. These produce a protective waxy cuticle layer. The waxy cuticle seals up the leaf so that the only way in and out are through the stomata, which are regulated by the guard cells. So from top to bottom, a leaf's structure: - Waxy cuticle and epidermis cells - Palisade cells (where photosynthesis occurs) - Spongy mesophyll (with vascular bundle running through for water transport) - Epidermis and cuticle, with stomata and guard cells spread throughout (allowing carbon dioxide in). At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Enzymes | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
04:12
Enzymes are really important proteins, that speed up the rates of reactions such as in photosynthesis, respiration and protein synthesis. The enzymes and substrates are always moving, and occasionally they collide at the right speed and orientation so that the substrate fits into the enzyme at the active site. Collision theory dictates that collisions must occur with sufficient energy and in a specific orientation for a reaction to occur. Enzymes are specialised; their active site matches the shape of the specific substrate that they react with. The enzyme and the substrate fit together using a lock and key mechanism. Once the substrate is in the active site, the reaction takes place. The required product is produced and the enzyme releases itself and carries on moving around. The enzyme could be protease, which breaks down proteins into amino acids. Or carbohydrase which breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. Or lipase which breaks down fats into fatty acids and glycerols. Hydrogen peroxide is often formed as a result of reactions in cells, and if it is left to build up it is harmful. Luckily, we have catalase enzymes that are really fast. They break the hydrogen peroxide down into the harmless water and oxygen. Equally, enzymes can help build up molecules like this… but the process is still exactly the same. Whilst enzymes do fantastic things, they are sensitive. Each enzyme has optimum conditions under which it works best. Firstly, there needs to be enough substrate around - they need a high enough substrate concentration for the reaction that they catalyse. If there is too little substrate, then the rate of reaction is slowed. Sometimes, if there is too much product around then the reaction slows because the enzymes and substrates have less chance of bumping into each other. So the product needs to be removed for a higher rate of reaction. Enzymes also have optimum pH and temperature conditions. Up to a point, an increase in temperature causes increased rate of reaction because there is more heat energy. More energy means more collisions. However, above a certain temperature the rate drops off due to denaturing. We will look at the effect of pH and temperature on enzymes in our video ‘Denaturation of Enzymes’. The pH and temperature optimum conditions are specific to the conditions in which they work in; an enzyme that works in the stomach for example would have a more acidic optimum pH. And of course, there need to be enough enzymes around for the rate of reaction to be optimised. So we know that enzymes and substrates fit together at the active site and form a ‘lock and key’ mechanism. The enzyme then releases the product and can be reused again. They are sensitive to temperature and pH, and there needs to be sufficient enzyme and substrate concentrations for reactions to occur. Enzymes not only control all kinds of reactions such as in photosynthesis, respiration, digestion and protein synthesis, but we also make use of them in day to day life. Protease and lipase enzymes are used in biological washing powders to remove proteins and fats from stains in our clothes. We also use enzymes in our food and drink industries; pectinase is used to break down the cells in fruit when making fruit juice so that more juice is released. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is Brownian motion? | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
02:36
What exactly is Brownian Motion? Learn it all on this video! At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Corrosion of Metals | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
02:53
Learn the basics about the corrosion of metals. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
How to extract aluminium by electrolysis | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
03:14
Aluminium is the most abundant metal on Earth. However, it is expensive because a lot of electricity is used to extract it. Bauxite is the aluminium ore. It is purified to yield aluminium oxide, which is a white powder. Aluminium is then extracted from aluminium oxide by electrolysis. The aluminium oxide must be made molten so that the ions can pass through it during electrolysis. Aluminium oxide has a very high melting point - over 2000 degrees celsius. So instead of trying to melt it, the aluminium oxide is dissolved in molten cryolite. Cryolite is an aluminium compound with a much lower melting point than aluminium oxide, and so using this reduces some of the costs in extracting aluminium. The steel case is coated with graphite, providing the negative cathode. The positive anodes are immersed in the molten cryolite, and are also made of graphite. When the battery is turned on and electricity flows, the aluminium forms at the negative cathode and sinks to the bottom of the tank where is is tapped off as a pure liquid metal. Oxygen forms at the positive anodes. The oxygen reacts with the carbon of the graphite, forming carbon dioxide. The positive anode therefore burns away, and needs replacing regularly. This is another reason for the extraction of aluminium being so expensive. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Le Chatelier's Principle: Part 2  | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
03:23
What exactly is Le Chatelier's Principle? And why is it important to learn it to understand chemical reactions? Find out in this video! Find part 1, the other video on Le Chatelier's principle here: http://youtu.be/7zuUV455zFs At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Electrolysis of Molten Compounds | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:04
Learn the basics about Electrolysis of Molten Compounds. What is electrolysis? What are molten compounds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
What are Isotopes? | Chemistry | FuseSchool
 
02:51
What are Isotopes? Find out in this video from the Properties of Matter chapter. 00:00:02,590 -- 00:00:07,319 In a previous video we learnt about Isotopes. Here are a few more examples. 00:00:07,319 -- 00:00:14,319 There are two isotopic forms of Chlorine: Chlorine 35 and Chlorine 37. Remember isotopes 00:00:16,910 -- 00:00:21,869 have the SAME number of protons, but a different number of neutrons. So how 00:00:21,869 -- 00:00:27,090 many neutrons are in each of these isotopic forms of Chlorine? 00:00:27,090 -- 00:00:30,980 Remember: Mass Number = Number of Protons + Number of 00:00:30,980 -- 00:00:34,030 Neutrons. And the number of protons for each isotope forms 00:00:34,030 -- 00:00:39,960 of elements is the same, so we can rearrange this formula to calculate the number of neutrons 00:00:39,960 -- 00:00:44,969 in each form. Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons 00:00:44,969 -- 00:00:51,969 When we look at Chlorine on the periodic table it has an atomic number of 17, therefore it 00:00:55,149 -- 00:00:59,860 has 17 protons. So Chlorine-35 has a mass of 35. 00:00:59,860 -- 00:01:04,480 Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons = 35 -17 00:01:04,480 -- 00:01:06,909 = 18 18 neutrons 00:01:06,909 -- 00:01:13,909 So Chlorine-37 has a mass of 37. Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons 00:01:15,360 -- 00:01:18,929 = 37 -17 = 20 00:01:18,929 -- 00:01:24,590 20 neutrons. So Chlorine-35 has 18 neutrons and Chlorine 00:01:24,590 -- 00:01:25,999 37 has 20 neutrons. 00:01:25,999 -- 00:01:32,999 Another example of an isotope is Lithium. Lithium has two stable isotopic forms. 00:01:33,340 -- 00:01:38,619 The atomic number of Lithium is 3, therefore it has 3 protons. 00:01:38,619 -- 00:01:43,450 The isotopes of Lithium have 3 neutrons and 4 neutrons respectively. 00:01:43,450 -- 00:01:48,729 How do we calculate each of the isotopes mass number? 00:01:48,729 -- 00:01:52,349 Remember, Mass Number = Number of Protons + Number of 00:01:52,349 -- 00:01:56,209 Neutrons. So for one isotopic form the mass number would 00:01:56,209 -- 00:02:00,059 be: 3 + 3 = 6 00:02:00,059 -- 00:02:04,489 So we would have Li-6 And for the other form, the mass number would 00:02:04,489 -- 00:02:05,599 be 3+4 = 7 00:02:05,599 -- 00:02:09,580 So we would have Li- 7 Want to learn more? Visit: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Xylem and Phloem - Part 3 - Translocation - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:20
Sugars move up and down the plant in the phloem. The phloem uses active transport to transport the food nutrients like glucose and amino acids around the plant. Glucose is made in the leaves by photosynthesis. Glucose is converted into sucrose in the leaves, which then enters the phloem vessels, as do amino acids. They then need to be transported around the plant to every single cell. The areas of the plant where sucrose is made are called the sources, and where they are delivered are called sinks. The phloem uses active transport because the sucrose moves against its concentration gradient from a lower concentration, where it is made, to a higher concentration in the phloem cells. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Transport in Cells: Diffusion and Osmosis | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
03:52
In this video we are going to discover how cells take in useful substances and remove waste using three methods of transportation: diffusion, osmosis and then in the second part we will look at active transport. The exchange of materials occurs between cells and their environment, across the cell membrane. To make this exchange as efficient as possible, some organisms have evolved specialised exchange surfaces like the alveoli in the lungs, or root hairs in plants or the nephrons in kidneys. Depending upon what is being exchanged and which direction along the concentration gradient things are travelling will determine whether diffusion, osmosis or active transport will be used. Diffusion is the process in which particles spread out from each other. They move from high concentration to an area of low concentration,down the concentration gradient until they are evenly distributed. Osmosis is very similar to diffusion but just for water. It is the movement of water into or out of a cell. Again, it is the movement from a dilute solution (so high concentration of water molecules) down the concentration gradient to a more concentrated solution - so low concentration of water molecules. The water molecules move across a partially permeable membrane. Watch part 2 to learn about active transport. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Crude Oil Fractions and their uses | The Chemistry Journey | FuseSchool
 
04:06
Learn the basics about the uses of crude oil fractions. Before watching this video you should watch our video explaining how crude oil is separated into it's different length hydrocarbon fractions by utilising the different boiling points of each hydrocarbon fraction. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Electrolysis of Brine | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
04:58
Learn the basics about the electrolysis of brine within the overall reactions topic. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What are Ions | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:45
What is an ion? What role does it have to play in the structure of atoms? Find out in this Chemistry Journey video by The Fuse School. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are catalysts? | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:34
Learn the basics about Catalysts. What are catalysts? How do catalysts work? Using catalysts in industry? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
The Lymphatic System | Biology for All | The Fuse School
 
02:08
Learn the basics about The Lymphatic System. This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
What are Radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:42
Learn the basics about radioactive isotopes? how they are created? and what chemical reactions are created? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
What are endothermic and exothermic reactions | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
04:17
An exothermic reaction gives off energy to the surroundings; like a fire giving off heat. An endothermic reaction takes in energy from the surroundings; like a snowman melting. Exothermic reactions transfer energy to the surroundings, and this energy is usually heat energy, they cause the surroundings to heat up. Just like a bonfire keeping everyone warm. As well as combustion (burning), other examples of exothermic reactions are: - Neutralisation reactions between acids and alkalis - The reaction between water and calcium oxide - Respiration. It is easy to detect an exothermic reaction - just get your thermometer and see if the temperature increases. Most chemical reactions are exothermic, because heat is given out. Physical processes can also be endothermic or exothermic. When something freezes, it goes from liquid to solid. Bonds need to be made for this to happen, and to make bonds you need to do some work, thus energy is given out and freezing is exothermic. Similarly, when condensation happens - because a gas is going to liquid, again bonds need to be made and so energy is given out. So freezing and condensation are exothermic. Because in exothermic reactions, energy is given out to the surroundings. This means that the energy of the reactants is higher than the energy of the products. Endothermic reactions are less common. They take in energy from the surroundings. The energy being transferred is usually heat. So in endothermic reactions, the surroundings usually get colder. Some examples of endothermic reactions are: - Electrolysis - The reaction between sodium carbonate and ethanoic acid - Photosynthesis. Endothermic reactions can also be seen in physical processes. When something melts it goes from a solid to a liquid. For this to happen, bonds need to be broken. And to break bonds, energy needs to be put in. Boiling is also endothermic because energy needs to be put in to break the bonds for the liquid to turn to gas. Because in endothermic reactions, energy is added to the reaction, the energy of the products is higher than the energy of the reactants. And again, we can detect endothermic reactions with a thermometer because the temperature would get colder. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Alkanes and Alkenes | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics of alkanes and alkenes. After watching the covalent bonds video you should have sufficient knowledge to understand about how alkanes and alkenes are formed and the differences between them. SUBSCRIBE to our channel to access many more educational videos. At The Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! This video is part of the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Testing for Hydrogen, Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, Ammonia and Chlorine | The Chemistry Journey
 
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Ever wondered how to conduct a chemical test for the presence of colourless and odourless gases? Watch this to find out how! At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
The functional group concept explained | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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This is the introduction to the Functional Group concept - giving an oversight about Organic Chemistry, the composition of Alkenes. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Limestone Cycle - limestone, quicklime and slaked lime | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about limestone cycle - limestone, quicklime and slaked lime. What are their properties, similarities and differences? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Tutorial: testing alkenes with bromine | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Now it is time to learn about testing for alkenes with bromine - an essential method in organic chemistry. This tutorial will you give the right tips! At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Xylem and Phloem - Part 2 - Transpiration - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Transpiration is the evaporation of water from the aerial parts of a plant (so the leaves and stems). By water evaporating out of these parts - mostly the leaves, a suction pressure is created which draws water up through the plant. This is called the transpiration pull. Water passes in from the soil by osmosis, passing down the concentration gradient, and into the root hair cell’s cytoplasm, and then on to the xylem vessels. Water moves through the xylem vessels from the root to the stem to the leaf. As well as the leaf cells needing water for photosynthesis, water also keeps the cells turgid which supports the plant. Inside the leaves, water is drawn out of the xylem cells to replace the water lost through transpiration. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Specific Heat Capacity  | Matter | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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You might have noticed that if you are trying to boil a lot of water it takes longer than if you only wish to boil a small amount of water. This is all because of something called ‘heat capacity’. Keep watching to learn more. Before we get into the details, it is important to realise that there is a difference between ‘heat’ and ‘temperature’. Temperature is a way of describing how hot or cold an object is and is measured in °C Whereas heat is a form of energy and is measured in Joules (J). The more heat energy transferred to an object, the more its temperature will rise. So heat and temperature are related but are not the same. So what is heat capacity? The heat capacity of a substance is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a material by 1oC. However, what’s more useful for us to think about is the specific heat capacity of a substance. This is, as it says in the name, a little more specific. It is the amount of heat required to raise 1 kilogram of a material by 1°C. Different materials have different known specific heat capacities, but we aren't always given a table like this so, we need to know how to calculate specific heat capacities ourselves. We have this equation, which can be written as symbols like this. The energy transferred is the heat energy absorbed or released. This equation can also be rearranged. To work out, the temperature change, subtract the old temperature from a new temperature. Let's have a look at the problem. Pause the video and attempt to calculate the specific heat capacity of lead. How did you get on?the energy transferred is this. The mass is this and the temperature change 10 degrees Celsius because it's this, take away this.Using the rearranged equations substitute in the values and we get a hundred and twenty-eight joules per kilogram Celsius. here is another practice problem, pause the video and attempt to calculate the energy transferred to the LED. did you get it right? We could divide it by 1000 to turn the answer into kilojoules. Notice that the answer is negative this time, it's because we called the LED the temperature change will always be negative if it is being cooled and positive is it being heated. So there you have it. To summarise, specific heat capacity is the amount of energy needed to raise one kilogram of a substance by one degree Celsius.It's helpful because it allows us to work out how much energy we need to heat up or cool down the substance to decide the temperature. To calculate use the following equation. Please like and share our videos with your friends, if you have any question that you want help with, just comment below. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Conjugate Acids and Bases | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn everything about Conjugate Acids and Bases. We explain this with the real world example of vinegar. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Mitosis - Stages of Mitosis | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we are will look at mitosis, including the names of the key stages: interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase and cytokinesis. Mitosis is the process of cell division that produces identical copies of cells, and is involved in growth, cell repair and asexual reproduction. When cells divide by mitosis, the number of cells increases, and hence the organism grows. Different organisms have different numbers of chromosomes. A chromosome is made up of two chromatids; one from the mother and one from the father. During interphase, the chromosomes duplicate and become two identical chromatids, joined at the centromere. So in humans, it has gone from the normal 46 to 92. During prophase, the chromosomes condense in the nucleus, and the spindle fibres form in the cytoplasm. During metaphase the nuclear membrane breaks apart, the spindle fibres attach to the chromosomes and the chromosomes line up at the equator of the cell. In anaphase, the spindle fibres shorten and the centromere divides, so that each chromosome becomes two separate chromatids. During telophase the nuclear membrane forms around each set of chromosomes. The chromosomes spread back out in their ‘new’ nucleus and the spindle fibres break down. In humans, each nucleus has the normal ‘46’ chromosomes again. The final stage is cytokinesis. The cell membrane pinches in to separate the two sets of chromatids into two identical daughter cells, with the same number of chromosomes as the parent - so 46 (or 23 pairs) in humans. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Stable and unstable nuclei | Radioactivity | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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How do you know if an atom is stable? In this video we are going to learn about radioactive decay. An atom is composed of subatomic particles called protons, neutrons and electrons. Positively charged protons and neutrons with no charge form the central nucleus. Negatively charged electrons orbit the nucleus. For more information on atomic structure watch this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNroKeV2fgk A strong nuclear force holds the positive protons and neutral neutrons together in the nucleus, and is what determines if a nucleus is stable. In stable nuclei, the force is strong enough and brings sufficient energy to hold the nucleus together permanently. Most of the nuclei formed during The Big Bang nearly 14 billion years ago are still in existence today! But not all nuclei are stable Unstable nuclei either have too many protons or too many neutrons, upsetting the strong nuclear forces. Unstable nuclei try to balance themselves by giving off the excess proton or neutron. This is radioactive decay. Unstable nuclei are radioactive and emit radiation. There are three types of decay: Alpha decay, Beta decay (minus), Beta decay (plus) Alpha decay is the loss of an alpha particle. An alpha particle is made of two neutrons and two protons. They have a mass of 4 and a charge of +2. When an atom loses an alpha particle the mass number decreases by four and the atomic number decreases by two. A new element is formed that is two places lower in the periodic table. When an isotope has too many neutrons it decays by beta minus decay. A neutron changes into a proton and an electron. The proton is retained by the atom, while the electron is lost. The lost electron is high energy and is called a beta particle. By losing a neutron whilst gaining a proton, the mass number of the atom remains the same... but the atomic number increases by one. A new element is formed that is one place higher in the periodic table. When an isotope has too many protons it decays by beta plus decay. A proton is converted into a neutron and a positive beta particle, called a positron. Positrons have the same mass as electrons, but the opposite charge. By losing a proton but gaining a neutron means the mass number stays the same, but the loss of a proton means the atomic number decreases by one. So how do we know if an atom is stable or unstable? We can determine whether a radioisotope is likely to decay - and what type of decay is likely to occur - by looking at its position on a proton neutron NZ graph. This graph shows the number of protons on the x-axis. And the number of neutrons on the y axis. This is the stability line. If a radioisotope lies left or right of this line, it is unstable and likely to decay to become stable. In this video we have learned that unstable nuclei either have too many protons or too many neutrons, which upsets the strong nuclear forces holding the atom together. Unstable nuclei try to balance themselves by giving off the excess proton or neutron either through alpha, beta minus or beta plus decay. Credits: Design & Animation: Bing Rijper Narration: Dale Bennett Scripts: Bethan Parry SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air. How do you extract oxygen? What are nitogren's properties? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Spectrometry | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Spectrometry. What is spectometry and its use? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Group 1 - the Alkali Metals | The Periodic Table | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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A great summary about Group 1 in the Periodic table - The Alkali Metals. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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We are trying to design a way to power vehicles of the future by using the hydrogen that is stored as a fuel cell for Motor Vehicles in order to obtain energy for the vehicle we need to rejoin the hydrogen with oxygen and this is done most efficiently in what is called a fuel cell in an ordinary electric cell a metal say zinc ionizes at one electrode the anode giving off two electrons the electrons are pushed around the circuit carrying energy - for example a motor and absorbed by metal ions of a less reactive metal say copper the circuit is completed by the movement of metal ions through the solution in a fuel cell the reactants are gases instead of metals hydrogen gives its electrons the electrons flow round driving the motor and arrive at the cathode where they are recombined with hydrogen in the presence of the reactive gas oxygen which provides the driving energy to form water again the electrodes can be made of porous carbon coated with a catalyst such as platinum or nickel advantage of combining a fuel and oxygen In a Cell is that you can in theory convert most of the chemical energy to electricity whereas burning them has happens in the internal combustion engine of a car has a maximum efficiency of about 50% and in practice only about 25% of the chemical energy does useful work in driving the engine the rest comes out as waste heat there are two major problems to using hydrogen fuel cells in vehicles firstly where do you get the hydrogen currently most industrial hydrogen is derived from methane and the carbon is rejected as carbon dioxide thus adding to the greenhouse effect the hope is that we can learn to mimic photosynthesis by using sunlight to split water molecules apart giving us a clean and simple source of hydrogen currently this is achieved by using photo voltaic cells to generate electricity which then electrolyte is water forming hydrogen and oxygen to take the analogy further the hydrogen is transported to the fuel cell like biomass passing along a food chain and the oxygen which we tend to take for granted is vented to the atmosphere the fuel cell then gets its oxygen from the atmosphere just like in respiration the energy is stored whilst the hydrogen and oxygen are kept apart the other problem is how to store and transport the hydrogen gas, once you've got it it's extremely difficult to liquefy and rather dangerous if kept as a gas under pressure particularly if the vehicle crashes research is therefore focusing on hydroxides compounds of elements with hydrogen which are solid or liquid at room temperature and which give out their hydrogen reversibly and without too much energy input this allows hydrogen to be pumped in reacting to form the hydroxide. Then on the journey the hydrogen is given off to be used in the fuel cell to drive the vehicle for example ammonia and borane a solid at room temperature with the same structure of ethane gives up its hydrogen on heating however it will probably be more energy efficient to run the cars on batteries which are charged from green electricity SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Group 7 - The Halogens | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Halogens, their properties and uses. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND

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