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Hydraulic Gold Mining
 
19:53
This movie is the last remaining part of footage from an old video cassette that I owned. I believe that it is still available from the Empire Mines State Park. I do not own the copyright to this movie and this is being posted here under YouTube's Guidelines for informational and teaching purposes. Then I added pictures on my own of the Malakoff State park from days gone past when mining was active in the area to the end of this movie. This is a great addition to this hydraulic mining playlist, so watch history being taught from long ago & then learn & enjoy.
Views: 64278 Reed Lukens
Desert Gold Mines: Exploring the Ten-Mile Tunnel
 
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The Ten-Mile Tunnel is an abandoned Arizona gold mine dating back to the late 1800s. Deep in the mine, I found an inclined shaft going both downward and upward. Later research on this particular mine revealed that this inclined shaft is approximately 1100 feet long. That warrants a return visit with more people so we can descend the inclined shaft to the lower levels and see what's down there. We've only just cracked the surface on this particular mine! Stay tuned! #ExploringAbandonedMines #AbandonedMines #MineExploring #UndergroundExploration
The California Gold Rush cartoon 1849 (The Wild West)
 
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Not many Americans lived in California, but that soon changed. By 1849 thousands upon thousands of people arrived in search of gold. Support the cartoons on patreon: https://www.patreon.com/simplehistory?ty=c Get your copy of Simple History: The Wild West today! https://www.amazon.com/Simple-History-Wild-Daniel-Turner/dp/153916036X/ Simple history gives you the facts, simple! See the book collection here: Amazon USA http://www.amazon.com/Daniel-Turner/e/B00H5TYLAE/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1457289367&sr=8-1 Amazon UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/Daniel-Turner/e/B00H5TYLAE/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1457289367&sr=8-1 http://www.simplehistory.co.uk/ https://www.facebook.com/Simple-History-549437675141192/ https://twitter.com/simple_guides Credit: Narrator: Chris Kane http://ckvox.com/ Animation: Daniel Turner CJ Boucher artwork: Daniel Turner Music: One Fine Day
Views: 626030 Simple History
Getting To Know Kay Cooper (Mine)...
 
16:10
I was actually on my way to another abandoned mine when I took a wrong turn in the desert (I know; it happens even to me…) and ended up at this one. I’m not one to pass up an attractive exploring opportunity and so I added this one to the list for the day as well. As you saw in this video, I started at the top of the workings and explored my way down as it seemed most logical to follow the route the ore seemed to have taken. I don’t know about you, but I had the impression that the miners here spent a lot more time laying down track and constructing chutes and trestles than they spent actually mining the tungsten here. Despite all of the mining infrastructure, it doesn’t seem like very much good ore was taken out. The workings on the hillside as well as the shaft with the headframe seemed to be the newer part of the mine. I have seen the video of another mine explorer that visited this site and he went down the shaft. Perhaps somewhat unexpectedly, the shaft ended up being relatively uninspiring as there was just one small drift level at the bottom and it didn’t really go anywhere. It may have tied into that “pit of doom” next to it at one time, but rock debris prevented this from being investigated. There were a number of dead birds at the bottom as well (if memory serves correctly, they were crows). To me, it seemed that the deep “pit of doom” is the oldest part of this mine. It wasn’t clear to me if there was a headframe over the pit at one time or not. There were some boards on the right that were obviously once part of some larger structure, but I’m unsure how they fit into the puzzle. It would have been awkward for the miners to work around the deep pit and so it seems likely that the large pocket cleared out to the left of the pit may have been the first area mined in that section. Obviously finding something worthwhile, the miners would have then followed the ore body down for a significant distance, creating the pit (that is an operation I would love to have seen in its active prime). I’d be curious to know what is at the bottom of the “pit of doom”. Given its age, the possibility of there being mining artifacts down there is tantalizing, and there are also likely drift levels branching off. Some days we just don’t have ropes and climbing equipment with us though. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13086 TVR Exploring
Finding The Gass Mine
 
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It was pure luck (and Mr McBride's nose) that brought us to this one as we had no idea of its existence... And it wasn’t just us – none of the local historians (including those that have written books on the mining history of this area) knew about this mine either when told about it. This mine eroded shut ages ago and had been lost to history. However, a particularly dry season in the area caused the soil to lose some of its cohesion, leading a portion of the roof of the mine to collapse and to expose its secrets. This provided just enough of an opening to the surface for us to discover this mine and for me to squeeze inside. Upon dropping into the mine, I realized that the collapse that revealed the mine was pretty recent and that no had been inside the mine for a very, very long time – probably at least for 100 years. It is an old mine, as one can clearly see the pick marks on the walls and no sign of any modern equipment. There was no sign that any ore cart rails had ever been present either as even in mines where the rails have been completely removed, one can still see the indentations where the ties were. So, it is quite possible that the miners lugged the ore and waste rock out by hand or by using animals. The timbers inside the mine were shriveled up and rotted away to almost nothing, indicating that they were extremely old. The artifacts we discovered around the mine dated to around the middle of the 1800s. And, judging by the size of the waste rock pile, this was a significant mine in its day. This was one of those extraordinary discoveries that a mine explorer lives for and, undoubtedly, this is the first video footage to ever emerge of this virgin mine. ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 5915 TVR Exploring
Interesting Underground Gold Mine Stuffed With Quartz
 
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This gold mine is one of those abandoned mines that didn’t look like much at first, but ended up being really interesting… Aside from the complexity of the underground workings we explored, we just kept finding stuff. Well, more accurately, I should say that my exploring buddy kept finding stuff. While I was inside the first adit looking around, Mr. McBride, discovered the lower adit and the buildings above the mine workings. Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about the history of this mine. As with many things, California is behind other states in digitizing the records in their archives. By contrast, Nevada is fantastic in this respect. The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and the University of Nevada in Reno have done a really impressive job of digitizing and organizing their records online. So, for example, if you have the name of a mine, you can look through their database and find extensive records and maps for the mine you’re curious about. Obviously, not every historic mine is included in their database, but most are. Even without knowing the history though, it is apparent that this mine is an older mine that was worked off and on for quite a while. It also doesn’t seem to be a big stretch to assume that a respectable amount of gold was extracted. I’m basing that on the size of the workings and how the miners burrowed off in all directions from that quartz core where the pit was. They even went down and ran another adit in... Actually, as I was typing that, I realized that it may have been the other way around. If you’ll recall, the track in the lower adit was the “budget rail” where the miners nailed the metal strips onto boards to run the ore carts over. Since the track in the first adit I entered was solid metal rail, it would suggest the possibility that the miners may have done well enough in the lower adit to afford to splash out on expensive rail when driving a second adit above. In other words, the lower adit may have been the first adit. The mine buildings just above the underground workings were interesting to us given their age. The main building looked just large enough to accommodate a crew of approximately the size of the number of names on the board where the miners would badge in and badge out. It’s possible a mining crew could have worked this operation in the winter, but given its remote location, fairly poor dirt roads and heavy snowfall in the winter, it seems more likely this was a summer mining operation. Was that a grave at the end? What do you guys think that was? ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 70487 TVR Exploring
Hydraulic Mining, The Series, Part 1
 
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Part 1 of the Hydraulic Gold Mining series. Featuring the devastation of the 1800's Hydraulic mining operations. A first hand look at an old sluice box and the Blue Lead along with some history and pictures. A great informational playlist that goes into every different aspect of hydraulic mining that I could think of. There is a lot of knowledge passed on in this 3 part series and then there are more movies added in on this playlist. If you find more movies with some new information on hydraulic mining that should be included in this playlist then let me know the url & I will add them in here for the person who has them posted :)
Views: 66391 Reed Lukens
Wild West / Old Ghost Towns / Gold Mining Movies
 
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You can watch the full movie at ; http://youtu.be/5GSMOMXsPUM Please Rate, Comment and Subscribe. Thank. Jeff
Views: 33961 Ask Jeff Williams
Fascinating Visit To The “Rogue” Miner’s Gold Mine
 
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We were very fortunate to be afforded the opportunity to visit this historic site as it is certainly not open to the public... Aside from the colorful personality of Mr. Randy Yager, we were also treated to an extensive tour of a rich - and still producing - lode gold mine (And not a dull visit of the “stay behind the white lines” variety that would be found on the tourist circuit either). As viewers of this channel know, it is rare for us to encounter very much in the way of historical mining equipment and artifacts at an abandoned mine. Many abandoned mines have had much of their equipment and other treasures carted away by the miners themselves when the mine was abandoned. Over the following decades, “collectors” carry away pretty much everything else that can be lifted and hauled away… Not at this mine though! At this mine, we get to see what a functioning gold mine looks like – one that was a medium-sized, mine-to-mill operation several decades ago and that now might as well be a living museum from that era. The shower room/work shop/drill room/bunkhouse/compressor room and the mill could use a little paint and some duct tape before they would be in pristine condition again, but we can still see all of the equipment in them as it was when this mine was in full operation and see exactly how things worked back then. I love the underground time, but I found that “moment frozen in time” experience on the surface to be fascinating. You’ve got to think that they were still actively mining here up into the 1960s when gold was $35 an ounce and the miners were able to support themselves on that. So, consider the potential of this mine now if it were to be brought back up to maximum production! With the background noise and different people talking, it can be hard to hear him sometimes, but if you listen carefully, Randy provides a lot of information about this mine. I tried to include as much of him discussing the mine as I could, but I had almost two hours of video that needed to be whittled down to make it digestible for the short attention span of many (but certainly not all) YouTube viewers. It was interesting (to me at least) to hear that the miners had simply tunneled past badly caved sections in the mine rather than deal with the hassle of trying to rehab these sketchy sections. I wasn’t clear if the 3,000+ feet that the adit ran past the waste rock pile where Cory and I climbed up the raise was just caved in one section or if essentially all of it was caved. I believe it was one section, but I’m not certain of that. As you may have heard, aside from the thousands of feet that the main haulage adit kept running, there were also four levels above us in the haulage adit and several levels below us. So, this is a pretty extensive mine. I’d imagine there could be some pretty good stuff to see in these other sections. It would have been wonderful to spend a whole day here, but when you’re someone’s guest, you move at their pace. Thank you again, Cory and Randy, for this adventure. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 16801 TVR Exploring
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
Views: 2194621 CrashCourse
California metal detecting
 
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California metal detecting - http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us/ California gold detecting with the Fisher GoldBug2. Watch as the metal detectorist finds a large 4 ounce copper (looks like gold) nugget we planted in his path. The Cargo Muchacho Mountains are located in the southeast Colorado Desert in the Lower Colorado River Valley, in Imperial County, California in the United States. California metal detecting: Mexican miners worked the area for decades before Americans entered the district in the late nineteenth century. In this sense it was more characteristic of mineral regions in Arizona and New Mexico that constituted the northern edge of a Hispanic mining frontier extending north from Mexico, which had been developed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. California metal detecting: When gold prospecting, you need good equipment to save time & help in finding gold nuggets by removing trash. Visit our site for real gold nuggets and prospecting equipment: http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us Also, be sure to get a FREE subscription to our popular gold prospecting blog at: http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us/california-gold-rush-miner
Views: 29377 GoldProspecter
Discovering a lost gold mining claim in the California desert - Going Alone
 
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I discovered this lost mining claim within a rock cairn atop an island of stone within the enormous flash flood plain called Siberia Wash. Imagine my surprise to look inside the rock pile and spot a metal tin secreted away within. Open this tin with me and find out what's inside. ---- My name is Kurt Bell and I am delighted that you have taken some time to share a little of The Good Life with me. I'm available on social media at the links below and can be reached via email at [email protected] Going Alone is an independent approach to living, uncovering what is real, and making peace with the facts of what is true no matter how the truth makes us feel. I upload at least one video a week for this series on my YouTube channel. The Good Life is a formulated plan of objectives and principals designed to help us live a more virtuous life in accord with sound reasoning. I upload at least one video a month for this series. Buy and read my book Going Alone here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0779LLWGV YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXFx-GHOyrQiiGqxE-J9fYA Facebook Main Page: https://www.facebook.com/LylesBrother Journal Page: https://www.facebook.com/Softypapa-337676096304661/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/softypapa/ Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/109050782163582511388 LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/kurt-bell-754416b Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/oldjapanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/softypapa CHANNEL CREDITS Softypapa avatar art by Hideki Lewis. See more of the artist's work here: http://eue-art.deviantart.com/ Channel Theme Music "Song For Kurt" used with permission by Nowherians. Discover more about the artist and their music here: http://nowherians.bandcamp.com/
Views: 53293 softypapa
Journey 1000 ft. Underground  - Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine - Cripple Creek - 1st person view
 
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Another cool adventure, on our recent trip to the Rockies. Highly recommended! Take the full, sardine cage ride with us, 1000 ft. below the surface, and walk and ride through the old, granite tunnels, of this decommisioned gold mine.
Views: 20769 creekdalton
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest – Part 1
 
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This mine was once made up of several smaller claims and the earliest records I can find on those date back to 1867. However, by the turn of the last century (1900), these appear to have all been consolidated into the large operation seen in the video. Given the large number of adits and trenches, the number of collapsed structures (I only showed a small number of them in the video), the large stamp mill and the need for a cemetery, this was obviously a significant mining community during its heyday. The guys I explored this site with are the Gold Country Explorers and credit goes to them for locating it. Gold Country Explorers find and post pictures of some really awesome places. You can find a link to their material here: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ To see one of those monster Fairbanks-Morse stationary engines running (and it is worth seeing), check out the great video at the link below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_0xifuTqVA An early (1800s) California State Mining Bureau report had this to say about the mill at the site: “A 20-stamp mill was located on the east side of the creek, with 900-pound stamps driven by a Knight wheel under 94’ of head from a 1,650’ long ditch; only one battery of stamps was reported as being in running order.” A later report (1900s) adds these additional details about the mill: “The mill at this time is described as possessing a 50-ton daily capacity, with a jaw crusher, 10 stamps, and ball mill in closed circuit with a Dorr classifier. Riffles were set below the stamps, and amalgamation plates below the ball mill. Three Fagergren flotation cells were followed by two Kraut cleaner-cells. A 200-hp diesel engine drove a generator to supply electric power, and a 440 cfm compressor was driven by a 100-hp motor.” Now, you may notice a discrepancy here as the first description mentions twenty stamps and the second description mentions ten stamps. As you saw in the video, the ruins of the mill at the mine site now has ten stamps. So, does that mean that an earlier mill was torn down and replaced by a new mill? Possibly. However, in the picture in the video, which was taken in 1937, a flume can be clearly seen leading toward the mill. Presumably, it was still being used when the photograph was taken because it appears to be maintained and in good condition. So, perhaps the mill was remodeled or rehabbed and ten stamps were taken away? The first report mentions that only one battery was in working order… In further support of this idea is the manufacturer’s stamp on the stamp mill itself. Union Iron Works of San Francisco ceased to be an independent company in 1902 when it was absorbed into a conglomerate called the United States Shipbuilding Company. This, therefore, dates the stamp mill to the time of the original report and would seem to suggest that it is the same mill. The last records of work being done at this mine date to 1939. You can perhaps better understand how everything is laid out at this abandoned gold mine by knowing that I did not backtrack or meander at all during the video, but continued in a steady downstream direction. So, the order in which objects of interest appear in the video are the order in which they are laid out across this sprawling site. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 34280 TVR Exploring
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest  - Part 2
 
18:01
There is quite a lot to this abandoned mine site and so while I found a fair amount when I was wandering around on my own, I still missed interesting pieces of mining equipment that Michael showed me the next day. Further, I’m quite confident that there is plenty more scattered around in the brush or underneath the ruined buildings that we both missed. Eventually, forest fires will roar through all of the areas where these abandoned mines we document are located. When that happens, many hidden adits and pieces of metal equipment that were hidden away in brush will be revealed. It certainly isn’t in any way worth having a forest fire for, but it is an interesting side effect. As I mentioned in the prior video in this series, credit for our trip to this mine site goes to Gold Country Explorers. They get out in the forests (mostly in California’s Gold Country) and have an uncanny knack for tracking down stamp mills and other impressive elements of our industrial history – not to mention, a fair number of adits too! Check out their site – they post some great pictures on there: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ It felt good to discover that adit that the Forest Service missed near the top of the hill. They are pretty thorough, but some things are not easy to spot in the forest and many adits are not marked on the topographic map. As I mentioned in the video, I’d like to show you the portal and how this adit was essentially hiding in plain sight. However, if I post that, the Forest Service will be able to find it pretty easily and will be out there as soon as the snow melts to gate it. So, I reluctantly declined to share the view from the outside. Like I said in the video, we need to preserve some of our industrial history outside of a museum. I also think it is important to maintain at least something in the way of the spirit of adventure and the excitement of discovery in our increasingly fearful and risk-averse society. The site of the shaft that we visited toward the end of the video was so badly degraded that I mistakenly speculated that it was an adit (easy to do when there were adits all over the place). However, my subsequent research demonstrated that it was, in fact, a shaft. I could not find many records on it, but the shaft dropped down for almost four hundred feet and apparently had two levels to tap into the hard rock gold veins underground. The large waste rock pile all around that section is supposed to be from the shaft. I’m not sure how the ore was transported from the shaft to the mill, but I’d be curious to know. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 49727 TVR Exploring
How Gold Mining Works
 
03:37
Ever wonder how people mined for gold? Have no fear! You can use a pan, a large drill, and even explosives! Anthony did some digging and found out many of the methods that people get that rare substance out of the ground and into your wallet! Don't miss Discovery's epic three-night event! Klondike premieres Monday, January 20th at 9|8c on Discovery Read More: Modern Gold Mining http://money.howstuffworks.com/30924-modern-gold-mining-video.htm "With the price of gold at all time highs, a familiar fever is sweeping Alaska." Gold Price Ounce http://www.goldpriceoz.com/ "Current gold prices per ounce and gold prices history." Improvements in Stope Drilling and Blasting For Deep Gold Mines http://www.saimm.co.za/Journal/v075n06p139.pdf "The rate of face advance in the gold mines is between 3 and 10 m a month, with a median value of about 5 m a month; it follows that faces are blasted less frequently than is planned." Gold Mining - Methods http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_mining#Methods "Placer mining is the technique by which gold has accumulated in a placer deposit is extracted." How Does Gold Mining Work? http://www.wisegeek.com/how-does-gold-mining-work.htm "Gold mining can use several different techniques, depending on the situation involved and the type of mining being done." What is the Role of Cyanide in Mining? http://www.miningfacts.org/environment/what-is-the-role-of-cyanide-in-mining/ "Cyanide is a naturally occurring chemical that is found in low concentrations throughout nature including in fruits, nuts, plants, and insects." Gold Fun Facts http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/gold/eureka/gold-fun-facts "It has been estimated that, worldwide, the total amount of gold ever mined is 152,000 metric tons, only enough to fill 60 tractor trailers." Watch More: 5 Surprising Uses for Gold http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnsJEEEgbvY TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-437-pets-make-us-healthier?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT The Truth About Diamonds http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjUCAMFVjaY ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
Views: 278338 Seeker
Historical NOR CAL Goldrush Mines (1849 to early 1900's)
 
09:21
I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (http://www.youtube.com/upload)
Views: 230 ProspectorRick
Incredibly Rare Wooden Ore Cart Found Inside A Mine!
 
22:15
Well, we certainly don’t come across something like this every day when we’re out exploring… Just like the abandoned steam engine we featured in another video, this is one of those incredible once in a lifetime finds. There are precious few of these wooden ore carts left in existence and even fewer that can still be found at an abandoned mine rather than rotting away in someone’s backyard. Fortunately, this mine is not marked on any topographic maps and it is in a very remote area of the desert. I believe this is what has protected it from the vermin that ransack these sites to sell the historical artifacts on eBay. Were it not for these circumstances, the wooden ore cart would have undoubtedly disappeared a long time ago. We have found bits and pieces of the metal frames of wooden ore carts in and around some of the old (1800s) mines in California’s “Mother Lode” region. So, obviously, they were used there. However, the wood has long since rotted away and whatever was left of the abandoned carts has disintegrated with time and exposure to the elements. If you consider it, wooden ore carts actually made a lot of sense for the miners in the past that were venturing out over steep mountains and down deep canyons, often over little more than primitive trails. Rather than needing to use a team of mules to haul a backbreakingly heavy metal ore cart up a sheer cliff to a mine, the miners could have hauled out the relatively lightweight (except for the wheels) components and then assembled the carts from the plentiful trees growing around the mine. And, as was mentioned in the video, if something breaks, the miners could just cut another tree down and repair the cart. From the look of it, the wooden ore cart at this mine in the video may have likewise been constructed from the trees found around the mine. As for the mine itself, which was almost an afterthought for me after finding the wooden ore cart, it wasn’t a huge mine, but I thought it was an interesting little mine all the same, no? The flickering effect created by the LEDs on the video drove me nuts when I was editing it, but focusing on the features of the mine, I liked the way the mine twisted around until it reached that small raise and the winze. Given how clean this first section of the mine was, I can only conclude that that section is the one that was worked most recently and the area behind the skip car (where the rails for the ore carts disappeared) was driven during the early days of the mine and then abandoned. I don’t blame the miners for abandoning that section of the mine given how soft the material there was. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 196679 TVR Exploring
Landscape Photography - 1800's Gold Mining and Native Forests
 
09:10
New Zealand forests and Landscape Photography have become one of my favourite combinations of late. Join me on the Mt. Crichton loop track as we get a wonderful variety of different photograph opportunities, from native bush to roaring waterfalls. My Instagram: @peggyclear My Twitter: @peggyclearphoto Gear: Nikon D3100 Manfrotto Compact Action Tripod Various NiSi Filters North Face Surge II Backpack Nikon Remote Shutter 18-55mm f3.5-f5.6 kit lens Canon G9X Rode Smart Lav Microphone
Views: 560 Henry Turner
California Gold Rush of 1849
 
04:00
hi
Views: 123948 Amy Cottle
Different gold mining methods
 
01:33
Gold Panning - http://goldgold.com In this video Dave Mack goes over and demonstrates the many gold mining methods used by modern gold prospectors. Methods include gold panning, sniping and sluicing. Also covered are highbanking, metal detecting, dry washing and dredging for gold. Dave has taught hundreds of people how to find gold over his long career in the gold mining industry. Dave is the founder of The New 49'ers Prospecting Association. Visit our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/new49ersvideo Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=new49ersvideo How to Find Gold - Learn gold prospecting techniques online with almost 3 hours of video instruction by Dave McCracken - http://goldgold.com/extreme-prospector-prospecting-videos About The New 49'ers - The New 49'ers Gold Prospecting Association is the premier gold prospecting club in the USA. Located in Happy Camp California, the club offers 60+ miles of gold claims where members can prospect for gold. For more information visit: http://www.goldgold.com/information-about-the-club http://youtu.be/o6qs-6IvigQ
Views: 19311 new49ersvideo
Gold Towns of the Wild West  Old Wild West History Documentary
 
41:13
This cool documentary has the host mining using 19th century (1800s) mining techniques. Produced for the History Channel.
A Most Unexpected Gold Mine In The High Sierra
 
23:43
This is actually not our first visit to this abandoned gold mine, but this is our first visit to THIS part of the mine. We couldn’t shake the feeling that we had missed something on our first exploring visit… So, after a couple of years, we returned to this abandoned mine high up in the mountains to take a second look at it. We found more surface workings where the miners had carved out trenches surrounding quartz veins and we observed that some of the surface workings we had seen before were looking much more eroded and precarious despite the relatively short passage of time (abandoned mines tend to have a short shelf life). Of much more significance though, while assessing what we thought was a simple ore pass to a caved adit below, we discovered something quite unexpected, which is the subject of this video… There was some confusion on our part as to whether what we found was a simple ore pass or a shaft. So, you’ll hear us refer to it as both. It was open to the surface and dropped down through various drift levels like a shaft. However, they also dumped ore down from surface workings at the top – like an ore pass - in order for it to be processed in the mill below. Sometimes these things are difficult to classify. So, what do you think it should be called? I apologize for the footage that is less stable than that to which you are accustomed, but you’ll recall the formula I have shared before: The more remote and harder a mine is to reach, the less gear I will be taking with me. I didn’t even have extra camera batteries for this one. Just my helmet, my handheld flashlight, gloves and my camera. That’s it. Yes, this is a remote mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 44313 TVR Exploring
An Unusual Gold Mine In Nevada
 
23:44
In this video, I endeavor to spare you, my dear viewers, from having to make the long drive to the middle of nowhere in Nevada (along with the associated costs for fuel and damage to your vehicle on the rough road in). In addition, you are able to avoid the relatively long, hot hike up to this abandoned mine. And, of course, you are also spared from needing to spend any time underground in this sketchy abandoned mine as well. Now don’t get me wrong, we (usually) enjoy this sort of thing, but most probably would not… The mineral potential of this area was first recognized in the mid-1800s and a town and mill sprang up around the areas in the canyon that looked most promising very shortly thereafter. However, no one appears to have gotten rich here and (as with countless mining towns) everything slowly faded away, interspersed with only brief flurries of activity when new discoveries or economic conditions temporarily brought miners out into the hills again. There are surprisingly few records available on this specific mine. Although it is mentioned that work took place here in the 1930s, the only years that we could find production data for were for two years in the 1940s. This was primarily a gold mine, but some silver was extracted here as well. The official production figures were not terribly inspiring, but it seems that contemporary mining companies still poke around this site from time to time – even in those small, fractured stopes underground as could be seen from the surveyor’s flags... Although samples have been taken, to my knowledge, no modern exploratory work has been conducted. My exploring buddy on this trip was Mines of the West: https://www.youtube.com/user/GramVideos95 ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 65432 TVR Exploring
Exploring Active Mines: Alleghany's Sixteen to One Mine
 
31:36
Located in the California mountain town of Alleghany, the Sixteen to One Mine is now the oldest gold mining corporation in the United States and with more than 26 miles of underground workings, it is a seriously impressive operation! This remarkably rich lode gold mine was located in 1896 by a man named Thomas Bradbury in his backyard (we should all be so lucky). More than a million ounces of gold have been extracted from the Sixteen to One Mine over the course of its existence (an amount worth well over a billion US dollars at current gold prices) and there is still much more gold inside of the mine waiting to be found... The gold inside of the Sixteen to One Mine does not follow a set pattern and is instead found in rich pockets randomly scattered across the quartz vein that the mine follows. Some of the pockets of gold are as small as an ounce or two and others contain tens of thousands of ounces of gold. The very existence of the Sixteen to One Mine revolves around locating these pockets of gold. The lower levels of the mine are presently flooded, but they are being dewatered at this time as the Sixteen to One Mine has two new gold detectors with proven successes in identifying gold in quartz previously undetected with older models. The potential of this new technology has inspired the company to pay the price of dewatering and rehabilitating the lower levels of the mine in order to pursue the gold they know is down there. No one has walked inside of the 3000 level since 1939 and so one can only imagine what might be found down there now. At present rates of pumping, the water in the lower levels of the mine is dropping at the rate of about 100 feet per month and access to the 3000 level may be restored by as soon as June of 2018. On this visit, we entered through the 800 Crosscut and first proceeded to the 49 Winze. Following this, we then headed deeper inside of the mine before dropping down through multiple levels to an incredible cavern that the miners carved out inside of the Sixteen to One Mine - the company calls this “The Ballroom” for its immense size and acoustics… For more information on the Sixteen to One Mine or even to buy physical gold or stock shares from the company, one can visit their website at: http://www.origsix.com/ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 42845 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 3
 
28:23
Given what a labyrinth this mine is, I thought it would be useful to use that deep winze (or capped shaft) as a point of reference for you. This level is huge! As you can see, it has taken almost two full videos for this level alone. And it still isn’t quite finished yet! However, with the many pockets and twists and turns, it took a while for us to cover everything. Given the size of this level as well as the many ore chutes, it seems a pretty safe bet that a lot of ore was extracted from this section. It also seemed as if there was a lot of mixing of the older and newer workings on this level of the mine. In other words, it seemed as if there were a lot of sections where the miners from the 20th century punched into workings - or overlapped with workings - from the miners in the 1800s. It was somewhat difficult to tell given how many boards had come down, but I believe there is a good chance that we saw examples of square set timbering on two occasions on this level. Square set timbering is the use of what are essentially wooden cubes stacked on top of each other to fill a void or cavity. They can be used to support enormous spaces (which this mine has an abundance of). I pointed out what I thought might have been square set timbering in the video, but didn’t mention how rare it is. To put it in perspective, I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and that is the first time I have ever seen square set timbering. How about that yellow portable air compressor? At least I think that’s what it was… I love the ingenuity of miners. Every mine we go to that still has some old mining equipment around, will have a good display of unique innovations from the miners – something created on the spot that we haven’t seen anywhere else. If you’ve been enjoying this series so far, you’re going to love the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 16249 TVR Exploring
Prices during the California Gold Rush 1849
 
03:06
Robert Peecher, author of the Jackson Speed Memoirs - a series of novels set during the mid-1800s, discusses his research about the California Gold Rush, specifically the prices paid for meals. If you think you might enjoy reading the Jackson Speed novels, you can find them here: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=robert+peecher+jackson+speed
Views: 90 Rob Peecher
The Kensington Mine: Happy To See A Collapse?
 
16:56
This large, ambitious adit was driven more than 6,000 feet into the hills you saw in the introduction to the video in search of rich silver ore. Those hills, by the way, are absolutely covered in Nevada mining history from the 1800s. Foundations, collapsed adits and shafts, gated shafts, small open adits, crumbling stone buildings, can dumps… There are essentially limitless exploration possibilities here for those interested in history and ghost towns. I have not been able to verify this information, but I have read that the adit we explored in this video was started in the 1870s and that a tram ran down the mountain to the mill seen in the introduction. The most striking moment in exploring this abandoned mine for us was when we reached the collapsed section of the adit and first heard the roaring sound described in the video. It was a huge volume of water! From our perspective inside of the adit, it sounded like the Niagara Falls was cascading down behind the, apparently, thin caved section between us and the torrent of water. As I explained in the video, we know that there were several crosscuts driven from this adit underneath other mines. Some of these crosscuts had raises pushed up to connect with the lower workings of these other mines. As such, the adit we explored is now acting as a massive drain tunnel for multiple mines. So, it is no wonder that we heard so much water roaring down back there! I have never heard of a situation like this before involving multiple mines and have certainly never heard this volume of water in a mine before. I would be very curious to see how it looks behind the caved section and to learn where all of this water flows. Anyone want to volunteer to find a way in? Oh, and here is the link to the YouTube channel for Mines of the West: https://www.youtube.com/user/GramVideos95 ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 23219 TVR Exploring
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 2: Discovered Underground Mine Train!
 
21:47
Sure, we’ve come across ore carts and trammers before while exploring at abandoned mines. However, finding an intact underground mine train parked with the ore carts still hooked up to the trammer (what miners call the electric locomotive) is something that I have never seen before or since. I’ll give away some of the secrets of the upcoming videos by saying that there is a second part to this train just a short distance farther down the track. I wonder if the operator of the trammer/locomotive felt a twinge of sadness when it was parked underground for the last time? I mentioned in the description and comments of the last video that I would talk more about the history and geology of the abandoned mine in this description. The below is a translation from Italian to English and the translation is not perfect. However, it conveys the relevant information. So, quoting directly, here you go.. “The Buca della Vena Mine (formerly Stazzema Mine) was part of the 15th-16th century Vene Ferralis, although it is believed that works were held there already during the Medicean period. Work restarted between 1850 and 1860, and in 1938 the Pignone of Florence company began excavating. Since 1957, the SIMA company (subsidiary of EDEM) continued to work regularly in the tunnel searching mixed mineral barite-pyrite until 1990. The field is described as a mineral body almost unique with barite, pyrite and iron oxides of good quality. It is oriented NNE/SSW, in the contact zone between shale Unit Fornovolasco, white dolomite and grezzoni. Considerable scientific interest was aroused by the discovery of rare or unique in the world mineralogical species. Minerals mainly extracted are: - barite used for chemicals, pharmaceuticals, petroleum industry and as nuclear power plants insulation - pyrite for chemicals and iron and steel - iron oxides for steel products” Although the mine being explored in this video apparently dates back to the Medicean period, I passed ancient workings while pushing up the canyon walls that date back to the Romans and even the Etruscans. In other words, the iron ore deposits here have not exactly been a secret for thousands of years. The section of the Buca della Vena Mine featured in this video hosted very dark rock and huge open chambers. So, even with multiple lights, it was a struggle to fully illuminate it. While there are certainly some even more impressive pillars and massive chambers to come, the rock is lighter and so that should not be much of an issue going forward. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 18350 TVR Exploring
Mining In The Hills Of The Gold Rush - Gold Panning In Alaska!
 
17:22
I had a chance to go to a once in a lifetime spot to go gold digging/panning/prospecting. I had the chance to visit Alaska to dig up what people from the gold rush era left behind during the mid 1800's. It was such a fun trip. We visited Ketchikan, Scagway, and Juneau Alaska and we found lots of gold! Thanks So Much For Watching And Please Dont Forget To Like And Subscribe! (This is very appreciated thank you.) Please hit the link below to SUBSCRIBE (It's very appreciated thanks) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxi4NmErFPEKhMf9hZpCsyg Also Please Check out my Gold Prospecting Channel "Depths of Alloys in the link below!!! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQFlC0hTIUbepWqa4SoccKg CHECK OUT MY WEBSITE IN THE LINK BELOW!! https://depthsofhistory.wordpress.com ****Please Follow**** Google+: google.com/+DepthsofHistory-MetalDetecting Instagram: http://instagram.com/depths_of_history Heath Jones Channel:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5iPVh8ORRfe1iLVQn4qCtw Tell him "Depths of History" Sent you! www.stonemountaindiggers.org www.americandigger.com Metal Detectors Used: Minelab X-Terra 305/705 Video Camera Used: JVC Everio Model Number GZ-HM30AU Samsung Waterproof pocket cam HD 1080p DBpower Action Camera Diggers used: Lesche Sampson T Handle Shovel Lesche pocket shovel Music Used By http://www.Purple-Planet.com http://americandigger.com/ Thanks For Watching (it is appreciated)!!! Sites Credited Use of Royalty Free Tracks: www.danosongs.com http://www.bensound.com/ machinimasound.com
Views: 61608 Depths of History
Abandoned mines and an ore bin in the desert exploration
 
04:28
Today I find some abandoned mines, and an abandoned ore bin in the Nevada desert.
Views: 220 Proper Explorations
Gold Rush   Hydraulic Mining
 
01:32
History Teachers - Buy history resources for your classes including worksheets, homeworks, tests, and presentations at: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Patrick-Gray Find extra credit materials for your own classroom and make a donation at: http://mrgrayhistory.blogspot.com/
Views: 15274 MGH
Exploring the Rohnda Mine and Ball Mill
 
31:42
10 years ago, https://starbuck.org/exploring/california/rhonda-mine/
Views: 29088 Mine Explorers
The California Gold Rush Experience: Facts, Miners, Timeline, Towns (1998)
 
01:24:51
The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671255371/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0671255371&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=e466e8af410d510aab178d97d3765afc The first to hear confirmed information about gold in California were residents of Oregon, the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), western Mexico, and Central America. They were the first to go there in late 1848. All told, the news of gold brought some 300,000 people to California from the rest of the United States and abroad. Of the 300,000, approximately half arrived by sea and half came overland from the east, on the California Trail and the Gila River trail. The gold-seekers, called "forty-niners" (as a reference to 1849), often faced substantial hardships on the trip. While most of the newly arrived were Americans, the Gold Rush attracted tens of thousands from Latin America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. At first, the gold nuggets could be picked up off the ground. Later, gold was recovered from streams and riverbeds using simple techniques, such as panning. More sophisticated methods were developed and later adopted elsewhere. At its peak, technological advances reached a point where significant financing was required, increasing the proportion of gold companies to individual miners. Gold worth tens of billions of today's dollars was recovered, which led to great wealth for a few. However, many returned home with little more than what they had started with. The effects of the Gold Rush were substantial. San Francisco grew from a small settlement of about 200 residents in 1846 to a boomtown of about 36,000 by 1852. Roads and other towns were built throughout California. In 1849 a state constitution was written, and a governor and legislature were chosen. California became a state as part of the Compromise of 1850. New methods of transportation developed as steamships came into regular service. By 1869 railroads were built across the country from California to the eastern United States. Agriculture and ranching expanded throughout the state to meet the needs of the settlers. At the beginning of the Gold Rush, there was no law regarding property rights in the goldfields and a system of "staking claims" was developed. The Gold Rush also resulted in attacks on Native Americans, who were forcibly removed from their lands. An estimated 100,000 California Indians died between 1848 and 1868, and some 4,500 of them were murdered. Gold mining also caused environmental harm to rivers and lakes. Overnight California gained the international reputation as the "golden state".[138] Generations of immigrants have been attracted by the California Dream. California farmers,[139] oil drillers,[140] movie makers,[141] airplane builders,[142] and "dot-com" entrepreneurs have each had their boom times in the decades after the Gold Rush.[143] The literary history of the Gold Rush is reflected in the works of Mark Twain (The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County), Bret Harte (A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready), Joaquin Miller (Life Amongst the Modocs), and many others.[29][144] Included among the modern legacies of the California Gold Rush are the California state motto, "Eureka" ("I have found it"), Gold Rush images on the California State Seal,[145] and the state nickname, "The Golden State", as well as place names, such as Placer County, Rough and Ready, Placerville (formerly named "Dry Diggings" and then "Hangtown" during rush time), Whiskeytown, Drytown, Angels Camp, Happy Camp, and Sawyers Bar. The San Francisco 49ers National Football League team, and the similarly named athletic teams of California State University, Long Beach, are named for the prospectors of the California Gold Rush. In addition. the standard route shield of state highways in California is in the shape of a miner's spade to honor the California Gold Rush.[146][147] Today, aptly named State Route 49 travels through the Sierra Nevada foothills, connecting many Gold Rush-era towns such as Placerville, Auburn, Grass Valley, Nevada City, Coloma, Jackson, and Sonora.[148] This state highway also passes very near Columbia State Historic Park, a protected area encompassing the historic business district of the town of Columbia; the park has preserved many Gold Rush-era buildings, which are presently occupied by tourist-oriented businesses. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_gold_rush
Views: 6052 The Film Archives
ROCKS to GOLD !!!. ask Jeff Williams
 
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Ever wanted to turn rocks into Gold and work in an underground Gold Mine, well now you can....and keep all the Gold you mine out....just click the link and make a $10 pledge https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams We go deep underground to mine out that Beautiful Yellow Metal..... . GOLD !!!! and then we take it back to the Ranch to Mill it down and then run it over the Shaker table to get even the finest Gold particles....... Then the Super cons are processed over a Multi sluice for final cleanup and what you have left is a Pan full of GOLD !!!!!! We want to thank everyone that made it out for our underground mining adventures and we hope to see them all back here real soon..... We also want to thank Jeff and Nic Nac out at the Ranch for taking care of us while we were not mining.... Can't wait to get back out there and do it again... So you know what I am gonna say ...huh So C'mon....Let's Go !!!!!!!
Views: 26426 Ask Jeff Williams
Drone Metal Detecting
 
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Drone Metal Detecting - http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us/california-gold-rush-miner/ Using my Yuneec Typhoon Q 500 G model with a GoPro Hero 4 black edition camera to film a weekend gold metal detecting trip to 29 Palms California. People collect gold nuggets just for their natural beauty. Also, many collect gold nuggets as a form of physical ownership of gold as defense against you wrote in buying power of the dollar and also to participate in an asset class that has been popular since biblical times. To see additional photos taken on this gold prospecting trip and or to get more information on where to purchase this drone at the best possible price be sure to visit our very popular California gold nugget site. To view our large selection of real California and Arizona gold nuggets visit our site at: http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us Also, to stay up to date with the latest gold prospecting news and gold price information, get a free subscription to our very popular gold blog at: http://www.california-gold-rush-miner.us/california-gold-rush-miner/ Also, get a subscription to our Youtube channel so you can get notified when we post a new gold prospecting video: https://www.youtube.com/user/GoldProspecter Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: information on the 29 Palms California area: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twentynine_Palms,_California Four hundred million years ago, California lay at the bottom of a large sea; underwater volcanoes deposited lava and minerals (including gold) onto the sea floor. By tectonic forces these minerals and rocks came to the surface of the Sierra Nevada,[83] and eroded. Water carried the exposed gold downstream and deposited it in quiet gravel beds along the sides of old rivers and streams. The forty-niners first focused their efforts on these deposits of gold.[86] Because the gold in the California gravel beds was so richly concentrated, early forty-niners were able to retrieve loose gold flakes and nuggets with their hands, or simply "pan" for gold in rivers and streams. However, panning cannot take place on a large scale, and industrious miners and groups of miners graduated to placer mining, using "cradles" and "rockers" or "long-toms" to process larger volumes of gravel. Miners would also engage in "coyoteing", a method that involved digging a shaft 6 to 13 meters (20 to 43 ft) deep into placer deposits along a stream. Tunnels were then dug in all directions to reach the richest veins of pay dirt. Drone Metal Detecting
Views: 10093 GoldProspecter
Exploring Old Gold Mine
 
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March 5 2014 Placer County Ca
Views: 427 Victor Marshall
Hunting a Gold Rush Mining Property
 
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Paul got us a permission to an old Gold Rush mining property. We both had a great time pulling up relics, bullets, and coins!
Views: 85 Diggum Detecting
Fosterville Gold Mine underground drone stope flight.
 
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Watch in 720 HD for best quality .
Views: 17770 FGM Mining
Hard Rock Mining
 
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A brief video of underground hard rock mining in Tennessee.
Views: 22230 Planmar Jones
HOW TO DRY PAN !!! To Find Desert Gold.
 
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Learn How to Dry Pan in the Desert to find Gold that others cannot. Go with us as we venture into the Desert and Find Gold on Bedrock using the Dry Pan method. For more then click here; http://www.askjeffwilliams.com/ Jeff Show your Support for Jeff by clicking the link. https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams
Views: 241906 Ask Jeff Williams
Panning grams of gold "AMAZING"
 
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Created by VideoShow:http://videoshowapp.com/free #panning #goldrush #vanlife
Views: 6090 CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH
$10 million of gold rush-era coins discovered in California
 
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Subscribe to ITN News: http://bit.ly/1bmWO8h A California couple found a stash of rare gold coins worth more than $10 million (£6 million) as they walked their dog in their garden. The 1,427 gold pieces, dating from 1847 to 1894, were discovered buried in eight metal cans on the couple's property in April last year. The pair are choosing to remain anonymous to stop people descending on their property in the search for more gold, a representative said. Report by Mark Morris. Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1aENuyJ Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1fta2Qp Add us on Google+: http://bit.ly/17z0Dpd More stories from ITN: Nando's steal giant mango in ridiculous publicity stunt: http://bit.ly/Mt1jEC Mystery virus hits children with polio-like symptoms in California: http://bit.ly/1mEt51J Is this Ukrainian President Yanukovich escaping by helicopter? http://bit.ly/MSVzow Fight breaks out between Ukrainian politicians: http://bit.ly/1p0P2Xq Funny bank robbery fail: Suspect drops thousands of dollars: http://bit.ly/1mhiTIS Gross! Woman discovers maggot living in her ear: http://bit.ly/1cDvtiT Polish foreign minister to Ukraine protester: "You'll all be dead" http://bit.ly/1btIlts Ukraine: Sniper and riot police filmed opening fire at protesters: http://bit.ly/OeVIn4 Shocking moment Pussy Riot are violently attacked by police: http://bit.ly/Oe1plf Dramatic rescue: Firefighter grabs woman jumping off building: http://bit.ly/N6FF9T Hijacking footage of Ethiopian Airline flight: http://bit.ly/1fe5Upw Is this the world's weirdest hotel?: http://bit.ly/1eME92D Why marijuana employees are in demand in the US: http://bit.ly/1bYacwA See 2013's Most Watched Videos: http://bit.ly/1cKAmGl See our Biggest Videos of All Time: http://bit.ly/18ZACCf
Views: 26872 ODN
Pocket Gold 20 Acre Placer Mining Claim on Trout Creek Montana
 
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Mining claim staked by the Department of Land Transfer information 2016
Views: 179 Steven Cyros
SLUICE BOX-New Secret Gold Mining Tool
 
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Visit us at http://www.bearbottommining.com - Check out this new secret gold mining tool to make your gold prospecting MUCH more productive! Also saves precious stones. It's a high quality product that you'll love using. (This video is the high resolution version of the demonstration. For lower resolution video for slower connection speeds, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4CihVUiAe0.)
Views: 1293005 bearbottommining
Electronic waste- The Future Gold Mines
 
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#EwasteGold, #ElectronicWaste,#EGold A small Canadian company’s new way of extracting gold and other precious metals is showing big promise for the mining industry, and for efforts to deal with the growing problem of electronic waste. The CEO of Vancouver-based EnviroLeach Technologies says the new approach is also the biggest innovation for conventional gold mining in 150 years. “The advent of cyanide in the 1870’s was the biggest innovation in all of mining history, and this challenges that,” says Duane Nelson. “Our technology has equal-to or better leach kinetics than cyanide, and a much broader base of available ores and concentrates that it can be used on. So this is potentially a game changer for the mining sector.” New water-based extraction process aims to become an alternative to acid- and cyanide-based leaching. EnviroLeach’s new plant, a joint venture with electronics giant Jabil Inc., will open in December in Memphis, Tennessee. The 650,000 square foot plant will shred and pulverize discarded circuit boards and other electronic waste. Then, using proprietary technology, Jabil will extract gold and other precious metals from the e-waste to manufacture electronic components for Dell, Hewlett-Packard and other clients. Because it’s water-based and uses harmless ingredients, Nelson says the process is far more environmentally friendly than extraction by cyanide, hot acid digestion or other conventional methods. “You can put your hand in it,” says Nelson. “You can effectively drink the stuff,” he says, adding it’s also less expensive because the solution can be used repeatedly. Applying inorganic electro-chemistry research methods, Nelson says EnviroLeach’s team of 20 scientists “stumbled upon” the new technique. Ore concentrate or pulverized e-waste is mixed with ordinary water containing five ingredients. The solution is then pumped through cells of small, man-made diamond plates and then zapped with electricity. The gold and other precious metals separate and are extracted from the solution, which can be recharged and used again. With environmentalists pressuring governments to deal with the growing mountains of e-waste around the world, EnviroLeach and Jabil shareholders see huge profits in recycling the 50 million tonnes of e-waste dumped in landfills every year. But Nelson says the new process can also unlock riches for conventional mining. Unlike cyanide or hot acid digestion, Nelson says the new process doesn’t damage equipment. More importantly, it could be used in locations where cyanide is banned. “So there are hundreds of mines out there that could benefit from this technology,” he says. Does cheap, effective and environmentally safe mining sound too good to be true? Nelson has this response for the skeptics. “You know, cyanide sounded too good to be true in the 1800’s. Personal computers sounded too good to be true,” he says. “It’s innovation, and the mining sector has not been one of the most innovative sectors out there. “The environment will benefit, the mining sector will benefit, our shareholders will benefit. I think everyone is going to benefit from this.”
Views: 93 Way of Life
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 3
 
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I’m not exaggerating when I say that this section of the abandoned limestone mine has the biggest adits (mine tunnels) that I have ever seen – and we have seen a lot of underground mines… It seems apparent that the miners were intent on extracting as much limestone as possible, while maintaining the minimum of what was necessary for the structural integrity of the mine. As such, we encountered adit after adit, all in rows with interconnecting tunnels. These rows of adits extend to the levels above and below too, leaving just a skeleton of stone behind to prop everything up. It really is an extraordinary site. Bear in mind, we only scratched the surface of all that makes up this mine. There are many levels we did not access and many drifts we did not go into. Given the sheer scale of the workings in this section of the mine, we assumed that these workings must be newer than the first underground workings we explored. Some have expressed surprise that the miners did not simply pursue an open pit operation at this limestone deposit. In fact, the remainder of this deposit is being quarried nearby. However, the miners were not stupid and the concrete plant is still in business. So, give them the benefit of the doubt in regard to pursuing the limestone deposit underground in this section. Given how low labor costs used to be and given that earthmoving equipment can handle a lot more now than it could more than a century ago when they started this mine, it was probably more economical for the miners to punch in from the side and to haul the limestone straight out rather than to dig down from the top in order to haul it up and out to be turned into concrete. Again, a big thank you to Alessio for sharing this mine with us... His channel can be found below and he does urban exploration in general, not just abandoned mines! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6015 TVR Exploring
In search of an old gold mine..Atlanta,Idaho..Bonus find!!
 
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On the way back down, I found two more mines,heres one...batteries were low on the SDC so I dint get to detect it, I planned on returning with my buddy Alan(Bearcat)but we never made it back up...unfortunately.....Someday though...
Views: 699 Derek Eimer

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