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Search results “3 techniques for surface mining equipment”
Types of mining methods || coal mining methods
 
05:21
Here in this video we have discussed different types of mining methods including coal mining methods:- 1.Surface Mining:- Opencast Mining Auger Mining Strip Mining Contour mining Highwall Mining Hydraulic mining 2. Underground Mining Board and pillar Longwall Mining Shortwall Mining Coal gasification Mining Sub level caving Integrated caving Blasting gallery method Wongawilli Mining Bhaskar and Tipong Mining **Music Provided By NCS** ➡️ Title:- Alan Walker -Force[NCS Release] ➡️ Video link :- https://youtu.be/xshEZzpS4CQ ➡️ Artist Credits:- Alan Walker ➞ SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/alanwalkermusic ➞ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/alanwalkermusic ➞ Twitter https://twitter.com/IAmAlanWalker ➞ Instagram http://www.instagram.com/alanwalkermusic
Views: 11639 Mining Technical
Base Metals - Surface Mining
 
03:15
Surface mining methods at our base metals operations. Vale's base metals business operates two types of mines, open-pit and underground. This video explains our surface mining methods at our base metals mines in Brazil, Chile, Indonesia and New Caledonia.
Views: 24261 ValeGlobal
OPEN CAST MINING METHODS
 
26:17
Subject :GEOLOGY Course :ENERGY RESOURCES AND MINERAL EXPLORATIONS Keyword : SWAYAMPRABHA
Let's Blast!
 
05:00
NOTE: Although this video shows an up-close look at the blasting process, NEVER go near an active surface mine or blast site without Federal training and permission. FYI, the white bags are Emulsified Ammonium Nitrate. The read cap is TNT and the silver rod that is connected to it by the yellow wire is the blasting cap, it's what ignites the shot. The white pebbles that are emptied into the blast holes by the powder trucks are the main explosive- "ANFO" or Ammonium Nitrate, which is a mixture of fertilizer and diesel fuel. Once the holes are filled with explosives, rock fines or "stemming" is pushed back in the holes and packed down to keep the explosives under pressure. After all the holes are loaded and rigged up, it's time for the fireworks! And remember kids, don't try this at home! Want to see more Blasting? Join the PAmining Channel and Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/PAmining/164948266897468
Views: 3514533 PAmining
Exploring Italy's Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 1 - (Lots Of) Surface Buildings & Equipment
 
31:59
I wasn’t sure what to expect when it came to exploring abandoned mines in Italy, but I did not expect them to be as impressive as they have turned out to be… This series will be the first of several abandoned mines in Italy that I have explored – and one of these was the best abandoned mine that I have ever explored by a significant margin! There will be four videos in this series on the Monte Arsiccio Mine. For the rockheads, there is some interesting geology present at the Monte Arsiccio Mine. The basic deposits here are barite, pyrite and iron oxides. However, within these deposits, geologists have located routhierite (a rare sulfosalt) as well as ankangite, a rare member of the hollandite structural family (Google it if you wish to know more about the geology at this abandoned mine as there is plenty of geological research and reports out there on this site that are in English). It was difficult to find much in the way of records on this mine (outside of the geology), but, as I understand it, the most recent operations at this mine ceased in 1989. This abandoned mine is on public land in Italy. It is not private property and it is not in the middle of nowhere. It is in the Apuan Alps in Tuscany and is near a fairly large population center. Therefore, it was absolutely incredible to me to see how much equipment was still at this mine and also to even see the entrances to the mine open at all. As impressive as this site is, I’m afraid that I might have missed some things. The blackberries and vines could easily have hidden the entrance to another adit somewhere or covered up some fantastic equipment. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13368 TVR Exploring
Open Pit Coal Mine
 
04:15
Open Pit Coal Mine Stellarton, NS,
Views: 658149 Jim How
Mining
 
06:51
019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 64130 Bozeman Science
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 3
 
16:45
After following the drift we ended the last video with to its surprising conclusion, we started moving back toward the main hub of this enormous abandoned mine. Along the way, we explored many of the side passages and raises that were bypassed on the route in through the main haulage adit located in this part of the mine. Following the very long hike up and out of the mine, we set up our camp for the night (we spent all day underground in this mine) and then headed above the mine to see some of its more interesting features above ground. You’ll see that we explore some of the mine buildings, including one that has an amazing collection inside of it. Although I was curious about what was inside of the modern mine buildings we discovered, I also had a specific destination in mind. One of my exploring buddies – Adit Addicts – had spotted what appeared to be a steam shovel abandoned above the modern mine we explored in this video. I wanted to see this machine to confirm what it was and also to film it if it really did turn out to be a steam shovel. As with the mine itself, it was quite a hike up into the hills above it. Fortunately, I was able to find the machine (although the GPS took me on a terrible route to do so) and it was indeed a steam shovel. Sort of... It was a steam shovel at one time, but had actually been converted over to run on an internal combustion motor. I had never seen anything like that before and it was pretty amazing to see one out in the desert mountains still next to the pile of dirt it had been excavating decades ago. The modern abandoned mine featured in this video is definitely not the first mine in this area and when looking around above the mine, it was fairly common to see old collapsed adits and old surface mining work. Many of these seemed to be more exploratory in nature though. This area has historically been a large producer of ores containing lead, copper and silver and a thriving town was once supported by the mines. However, today, there is almost no trace left of the ghost town or an aerial tramway that also used to be here. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 85968 TVR Exploring
Strip Mining for Coal
 
06:31
Mining for Coal in Stellarton on Nov.6 2012.
Views: 64578 JimHowDigsDirt
Ventilation Control of Coal Dust in Mines 1980 MSHA
 
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This 1980 MSHA film clip demonstrates various ventilation techniques to control dust including the use of proper face ventilation to effectively remove airborne dust. Over the years, some consensus has emerged on the best dust control practices. The NIOSH Publication, Handbook for Dust Control in Mining summarizes those practices and is available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/pubs/pubreference/outputid20.htm . This handbook describes effective methods for the control of mineral dusts in mines and tunnels for different kinds of mines and mining equipment. This includes underground coal and hard-rock mines, as well as surface mines, stone mines, and hard-rock tunnels. Dust control methods described are practical and cost-effective for most mine operators. This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 17009 markdcatlin
T955III Terrain Leveler Surface Excavation Machine
 
01:31
The T955 COMMANDER 3, complete with the ATAAC Caterpillar C9 ACERT Tier 3 engine, provides all the torque you need to get the job done. It is available with either a trencher or Terrain Leveler surface excavation attachment, which is seen here. Learn more about Vermeer surface mining equipment: http://www2.vermeer.com/vermeer/NA/en/N/equipment/terrain_leveler_sem/t955iii_terrain_leveler_sem
Views: 8245 Vermeer
Surface Miners (Dozer Operator)
 
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On this episode of Surface Miners, we take a quick look at Maintenance and Dozer Operators.
Views: 1358 JR Vance
How To Find Abandoned Mines
 
31:22
So, you want to know how to find a specific abandoned mine or abandoned mines in general? We will dive into answering that question in this video by taking you along on our search for an abandoned mine that took us two years to locate! Along the way you’ll have the opportunity to observe the tools and techniques we use to find the historic mines that appear in our videos and you will, hopefully, be able to incorporate some of what we have learned over the years (and are now sharing with you) into your own search for mines and mine sites. I will cover how we find out about mines in the first place, the research that we do, the online resources we utilize, the technology we take out in the field with us and more. Whether you are a historian or a gold miner looking for promising sites to file claims on or a mine explorer interested in documenting our industrial heritage or are just curious what is around the area where you live, this video will, hopefully, have something useful for you. Some of you will obviously already know many, if not all, of these search techniques. However, this video is intended to have something for everyone – from the novice to the experienced mine hunter. Many people have no interest at all in finding lost mines, but enjoying seeing them and the efforts of others to find them, and so I have included the footage of the mine when we finally found it for that demographic as well. Fortunately, we don’t normally have to work this hard to find an abandoned mine, but if our search for this mine, although quite unpleasant and frustrating at times, was useful to someone else out there, then it was worth it. Happy hunting! Here are the links for the websites mentioned in this video: https://thediggings.com/ caltopo.com http://www.mylandmatters.org/ http://www.westernmininghistory.com/ https://www.google.com/earth/ https://goldrushexpeditions.com/ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 14564 TVR Exploring
DRILLING AND BLASTING VIDEO / OPENCAST MINE / BAUXITE MINE / INDIA
 
02:48
This video is about drilling and blasting. these are two main things of any MINES. This video is from an OPENCAST, Bauxite Mine. Here drilling of blast hole ( 8 M, dia- 6.5 Inch ) , loading of explosive ( ANFO ) with boosters is shown. But the main blasting video is not available here as we were denied from shooting it and we need to be atleast 2-3 k.m.s away from the blast zone. Hope you guys like it, comment for any better recommendation and please SUBSCRIBE. 60% Discount at Amazon | Hurry Up | Deals closing Today 12.00PM follow these links to buy.... ladies jeans :- http://amzn.to/2q5AYkz ladies kurtas :- http://amzn.to/2p8ccRu Wrangler clothes for Men :- http://amzn.to/2oXixRb Pepe jeans T-shirts for Men :- http://amzn.to/2oCRJCC Summer Beauty Products :- http://amzn.to/2q5KV1n
Views: 1766 Million Mallick
Hard face welding for rock crusher
 
06:31
A basic demonstration on how I do hard face welding and the equipment I use. I'm in SW Florida at strip mine, the rotor needs some love. So I will apply hard face rods in critical areas.
Views: 11970 David Spin
Exploring The Vulture Mine: Part 1 of 3 - Remote Mining Camp
 
12:31
This might not be an easy mine to get to, but the effort is well worth it. In the first video of this series, we explore the amazingly well-preserved desert mining camp and follow the rails around the mountain peak. The innovations on display at this abandoned mine are truly a testament to the ingenuity and resourcefulness of miners. I still do not know what that - presumably wind-driven - device made mostly out of old washing machines is… I sure hope that a viewer can weigh in on that one. I know that I said it several times in the video, but there was so much stuff at this mine that it was hard to take it all in – all of the engines, engine parts, tools, buckets, barrels, washing machines, random bits of rail and wood, cans, jugs, wires, cables... Well, you get the idea. There was a lot of equipment scattered around the mine site! Some of the old engines, tools, Union Carbide cans and other such rarities really belong in a museum, but it is pretty cool to be able to see them out in the field like this. I hardly feature it in the videos, but all around this mine were small prospect pits and places where the miners had obviously gone into various cliff faces for a few feet. So, I don’t know if they were picking out small pockets of material or if they were looking for something that wasn’t present other than where the main adits are. In the second video of the series, we explore the adit seen in the first video and in the final video, we explore an upper adit we discovered farther up the mountain at this abandoned mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 20669 TVR Exploring
Rock Mining (Quarrying) Process
 
01:37:37
Hillsides explode, massive blocks of stone break off of solid rock walls and powerful machines crush large rocks in a matter of seconds. One mile of a two-la. Hillsides explode, massive blocks of stone break off of solid rock walls and powerful machines crush large rocks in a matter of seconds. One mile of a two-la. 250 300 tph hard rock processing plant for mining, quarrying, aggregate More details: Get the price of machines: http. zenith is an internationally renowned manufacturer of mining machinery Equipment Co., Ltd. Shanghai zenith .
Views: 345172 Documentary Lab
Mining on the Cutting Edge with Volvo Construction Equipment
 
03:13
A limestone producer in northern Kentucky is setting higher standards for underground mining with inventive techniques and a lean fleet of Volvo Construction Equipment.
OPEN PIT MINING OF COPPER IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST 1960s MOVIE  57284
 
37:52
Produced by the Marion Power Shovel Company, this fascinating movie looks at copper and copper mining in the 1960s, when the American mines were at peak production and financial troubles loomed. The film looks at the future of mining, including the development of efficiencies to keep mines in business. Open pit mining techniques are shown, with a focus on the Southwest. At 2:00, Bingham Canyon and the Utah Mining Company pit (also known as the Kennecott Copper Mine) is seen. At 2:40, various open pit mines are seen which use either trucks or trains to remove ore. Although they are not named, it's likely that one of them is the Phelps-Dodge mine at Bisbee, Arizona. At 5:40, exploratory core drilling is shown. At 6:30, exploration programs are shown including at 6:43, an engineering team that maps mine development. Various drill systems are seen at 9:00, including the rotary drill. At 10:30, preparations are seen towards using explosives with the burying of dynamite and detonators for excavation. At 12:12, loading of explosives is seen with an emphasis on safe handling. At 14:51, a cage drill is shown in use allowing rocks to be drilled in the field (without being moved by shovels) for explosive removal. At 16:00, a small 4.5 yard bucket shovel is shown being used to move blast debris. At 16:00, a 6-yard loading shovel is seen. At 17:49, overburden waste from the pit is loaded on a train so that it can be moved and dumped at a remote area. At 18:50, a 13-yard shovel is seen in use with a large truck also in use. As the narrator explains, these large size equipment is needed to lower unit costs of copper, and are an economic necessity given the modern financial conditions. At 19:52, the motorized wheel principle of new types of mining trucks is seen, and the narrator comments that next generation trucks will carry over 100 tons of ore. At 22:55, a grader is seen working the mine roads, and the narrator comments about how tires wear out so quickly on the job that they account for up to 1% of mining costs. At 24:30, railroad trains are shown on the move at a mine, moving 60-125 ton per car loads. The narrator comments further on the use of railroads in pit mining. At 26:30, a large shovel is seen loading a train, sprinkling the loads with water to hold down dust. The large boulders in the loads make this type of work dangerous. At 27:16, ore loads are dumped into a crusher at a mill site. At 27:40, a rail waste dump into a slag pile is seen. At 28:00, a train-based grader is used to clear tracks of debris. The narrator notes that the mining railroads are some of the busiest in the USA and the world. At 28:44, new tracks are installed due to various demands, and mechanized railroad ballast systems are used for fast track installation. At 31:20, a skip hoist is seen being used to take ore from a deep, small pit to the surface. At 32:50, a series of leeching ponds is seen, with water percolated through the ponds to precipitate copper. At 34:00, a machine shop is seen at the mine, providing repair and maintenance services at the mine. At 35:40, a heavy repair part is unloaded at the mine using a power shovel. At 36:00, a research laboratory is seen at work, developing new uses of copper in the atomic and other industries. At 36:40, the IBM Ramac computer is seen. The IBM 305 RAMAC was the first commercial computer that used a moving-head hard disk drive (magnetic disk storage) for secondary storage. The film ends with a shot of a heap of pennies, with the narrator noting that the industry is working hard to expand production to fulfill future needs. The Bingham Canyon Mine, more commonly known as Kennecott Copper Mine, is extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Oquirrh Mountains. The mine is the largest man-made excavation in the world and produced more copper than any other mine in history – more than 19 million tons. The mine has been in production since 1906, and has resulted in the creation of a pit over 0.6 miles (970 m) deep, 2.5 miles (4 km) wide, and covering 1,900 acres (770 ha). Marion Power Shovel Company was an American firm that designed, manufactured and sold steam shovels, power shovels, blast hole drills, excavators, and dragline excavators. The company was a major supplier of shovels for the construction of the Panama Canal. Founded in Marion, Ohio in August, 1884 as the Marion Steam Shovel Company, the company grew through sales and acquisitions throughout the 20th century. The company changed its name to Marion Power Shovel Company in 1946 to reflect the industry's change from steam power to diesel power. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 3192 PeriscopeFilm
Drilling and Blasting Introduction
 
03:38
Shot, Edit, Voiced, Produced - An Introduction to Drilling and Blasting in the Construction Industry
Views: 22588 BenHiggins28
Fascinating Visit To The “Rouge” Miner’s Gold Mine
 
31:22
We were very fortunate to be afforded the opportunity to visit this historic site as it is certainly not open to the public... Aside from the colorful personality of Mr. Randy Yager, we were also treated to an extensive tour of a rich - and still producing - lode gold mine (And not a dull visit of the “stay behind the white lines” variety that would be found on the tourist circuit either). As viewers of this channel know, it is rare for us to encounter very much in the way of historical mining equipment and artifacts at an abandoned mine. Many abandoned mines have had much of their equipment and other treasures carted away by the miners themselves when the mine was abandoned. Over the following decades, “collectors” carry away pretty much everything else that can be lifted and hauled away… Not at this mine though! At this mine, we get to see what a functioning gold mine looks like – one that was a medium-sized, mine-to-mill operation several decades ago and that now might as well be a living museum from that era. The shower room/work shop/drill room/bunkhouse/compressor room and the mill could use a little paint and some duct tape before they would be in pristine condition again, but we can still see all of the equipment in them as it was when this mine was in full operation and see exactly how things worked back then. I love the underground time, but I found that “moment frozen in time” experience on the surface to be fascinating. You’ve got to think that they were still actively mining here up into the 1960s when gold was $35 an ounce and the miners were able to support themselves on that. So, consider the potential of this mine now if it were to be brought back up to maximum production! With the background noise and different people talking, it can be hard to hear him sometimes, but if you listen carefully, Randy provides a lot of information about this mine. I tried to include as much of him discussing the mine as I could, but I had almost two hours of video that needed to be whittled down to make it digestible for the short attention span of many (but certainly not all) YouTube viewers. It was interesting (to me at least) to hear that the miners had simply tunneled past badly caved sections in the mine rather than deal with the hassle of trying to rehab these sketchy sections. I wasn’t clear if the 3,000+ feet that the adit ran past the waste rock pile where Cory and I climbed up the raise was just caved in one section or if essentially all of it was caved. I believe it was one section, but I’m not certain of that. As you may have heard, aside from the thousands of feet that the main haulage adit kept running, there were also four levels above us in the haulage adit and several levels below us. So, this is a pretty extensive mine. I’d imagine there could be some pretty good stuff to see in these other sections. It would have been wonderful to spend a whole day here, but when you’re someone’s guest, you move at their pace. Thank you again, Cory and Randy, for this adventure. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6005 TVR Exploring
A Most Unexpected Gold Mine In The High Sierra
 
23:43
This is actually not our first visit to this abandoned gold mine, but this is our first visit to THIS part of the mine. We couldn’t shake the feeling that we had missed something on our first exploring visit… So, after a couple of years, we returned to this abandoned mine high up in the mountains to take a second look at it. We found more surface workings where the miners had carved out trenches surrounding quartz veins and we observed that some of the surface workings we had seen before were looking much more eroded and precarious despite the relatively short passage of time (abandoned mines tend to have a short shelf life). Of much more significance though, while assessing what we thought was a simple ore pass to a caved adit below, we discovered something quite unexpected, which is the subject of this video… There was some confusion on our part as to whether what we found was a simple ore pass or a shaft. So, you’ll hear us refer to it as both. It was open to the surface and dropped down through various drift levels like a shaft. However, they also dumped ore down from surface workings at the top – like an ore pass - in order for it to be processed in the mill below. Sometimes these things are difficult to classify. So, what do you think it should be called? I apologize for the footage that is less stable than that to which you are accustomed, but you’ll recall the formula I have shared before: The more remote and harder a mine is to reach, the less gear I will be taking with me. I didn’t even have extra camera batteries for this one. Just my helmet, my handheld flashlight, gloves and my camera. That’s it. Yes, this is a remote mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 28377 TVR Exploring
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 3
 
19:52
I’m not exaggerating when I say that this section of the abandoned limestone mine has the biggest adits (mine tunnels) that I have ever seen – and we have seen a lot of underground mines… It seems apparent that the miners were intent on extracting as much limestone as possible, while maintaining the minimum of what was necessary for the structural integrity of the mine. As such, we encountered adit after adit, all in rows with interconnecting tunnels. These rows of adits extend to the levels above and below too, leaving just a skeleton of stone behind to prop everything up. It really is an extraordinary site. Bear in mind, we only scratched the surface of all that makes up this mine. There are many levels we did not access and many drifts we did not go into. Given the sheer scale of the workings in this section of the mine, we assumed that these workings must be newer than the first underground workings we explored. Some have expressed surprise that the miners did not simply pursue an open pit operation at this limestone deposit. In fact, the remainder of this deposit is being quarried nearby. However, the miners were not stupid and the concrete plant is still in business. So, give them the benefit of the doubt in regard to pursuing the limestone deposit underground in this section. Given how low labor costs used to be and given that earthmoving equipment can handle a lot more now than it could more than a century ago when they started this mine, it was probably more economical for the miners to punch in from the side and to haul the limestone straight out rather than to dig down from the top in order to haul it up and out to be turned into concrete. Again, a big thank you to Alessio for sharing this mine with us... His channel can be found below and he does urban exploration in general, not just abandoned mines! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 4037 TVR Exploring
The Land of Mountaintop Removal
 
02:58
Over five hundred mountains in West Virginia have been destroyed because of new mining techniques used by coal companies in the Appalachians. From: AERIAL AMERICA: West Virginia http://bit.ly/1lEvUuh
Views: 96441 Smithsonian Channel
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 3 – Into The (Sketchy) Upper Adit
 
20:37
On the hike back to my rental car to retrieve the waders, I unintentionally interrupted a young Italian couple having sex in their Mercedes. They had driven up and parked next to the abandoned mine buildings seen in the first video because, obviously, who would care about some abandoned mine? What better place to be alone? The look of horror on the girl’s face as I emerged from the brush, covered in mud and mine exploring gear, was priceless. One would think they’d have seen my car on the way in, but I suppose they had other things on their minds. I guess I wasn’t the only one receiving surprises at this mine on that day... After being surprised by all of the equipment on the surface and the discovery of the lower adit, I wasn’t sure what to expect with this upper adit that I had initially bypassed. As you’ll see in the video, it ended up being rather sketchy. Other abandoned iron mines that I have been inside were extremely solid. So, I did not expect the conditions inside of the Monte Arsiccio Mine to be as sporty as they were. The older workings were particularly bad. So, I can understand why they were barricaded off… The amount of material that had come down (ground fall) in the older workings made it difficult to learn much about them since the drifts were either caved or artifacts were buried underneath tons of rock that I was just able to scramble over the top of (which is never a good feeling because one is walking on what used to be the top of the adit). For example, what was that unusual “room” that was in the shape of a hexagon? So much rock had fallen down that it was impossible to determine what was in there or what might have been in there. I thought it was interesting how the older and newer workings are literally layered right on top of each other inside of this mine and how much they run together. At times, it is difficult to tell where the old workings end and the new workings begin. Typically, in a mine with newer and older workings, the new and the old are very distinct and separate. I thought it was even more interesting to see how thin the layer of rock that the miners had been driving the LHD on was! That layer of rock between the level I was shooting from and the cavity created by the older workings below was perhaps a foot thick. Really, I am surprised that section where the large pit now is did not collapse when the fully loaded LHD was rumbling over the top of it. I guess the Italians did a good job managing the laws of physics on that one… They certainly made the most of extracting the ore they were after since the older workings below run RIGHT up to the newer workings. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 9742 TVR Exploring
Iron Mining 2017 Documentary HD - Iron Ore Mining
 
59:15
This HD Documentary looks at the Technology behind Iron mining. How iron mined in Minnesota is made into steel; iron weapons revolutionize warfare; military metallurgists customize weapons and demonstrate their firepower; iron magnets.
What Kind Of Mine Is This?
 
12:12
Sometimes we don’t know a lot about the abandoned mines that we visit. Other times we don’t know anything at all – not even a name. That is the case with this mystery mine. I don’t know the name or even what was mined here. However, I fortunately have smart viewers that know a lot about the world and so I want to know what you think of this mine… Share your knowledge! It seems there was once a settlement of a decent size at this mine given the mine buildings and the several outbuildings that, I believe, included at least two bunkhouses. There are no other mines indicated on maps of the area that I have seen. And we scouted out the surrounding area a bit without seeing a sign of any other mining activity. So, presumably, all of those buildings are connected to our mystery mine. There is a lot there though for what seems a relatively small mine and it must have cost them a fair amount of money to get all of that established. Of course, that could also be why it is abandoned as the miners presumably lost a pile of money on the project. In Nevada, there is a lot of public land that is fenced off for cattle. Barbed wire stretches across some of the roads to form a crude gate. One simply unhooks the barbed wire and pulls it aside. After driving through, one simply hooks the loop of barbed wire across the post again. It is a primitive, but it works as long as individuals are courteous enough to close the “gate” again. However, it seems that many people are deterred by these “gates” and do not understand that they are allowed to access the land behind them. This mine was accessed via one of those “gated” roads and it is in an already very scarcely populated area. So, I didn’t have the impression that many people made it out here. That impression was solidified by the rough road out to the mine. One is required to drive up a wash for part of the journey and I ended up unintentionally using the truck as something of a bulldozer in some of the larger piles of river rock spilling across the road to the mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy it. This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13950 TVR Exploring
blasting mining limestone
 
03:00
More Details : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html we will provide a professional answer and quality of services. If this video does not meet your needs I apologize here. Visit Website: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com Contact Us For Help: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com/chat.html RSMML, Mining of Rock phosphate, gypsum, Lignite, Limestone Mining, Limestone: SANU LIMESTONE UNIT, JAISLAMER. H igh quality Limestone is a technological necessity for Steel Plants with the basic oxygen furnance technology limestone quarry drilling and blasting techniques limestone drilling process . limestone quarry drilling and blasting techniques This video shows the processes and techniques required for Buechel Stone to quarry Wirtgen surface Mining in Russia: Selective limestone mining In the selective mining of limestone, Wirtgen surface miners guarantee constantly highly daily rates without drilling or blasting. STATE LAWS ON DAMAGES CAUSED BY QUARRYING noise control; precious metals; environmental protection (general); permits; zoning; location: mining; pollution, noise; blasting crushing limestone blasting crushing limestone. skema sand blasting machine; quarry blasting hard stone quarry in india; sand blasting equipment south africa; shot blasting machine Mine Blasts in the Aru, L?una Limestone Quarry, a Publication ? Mine Blasts in the Aru, L?una Limestone Quarry, a Multidiciplinary Study Using Seismology and Mining Engineering. Drilling For Limestone Quarries In India quarry and rock mining in india. limestone quarry, gold mining natural stone quarry, marble quarries india, quarry blasting Experienced drilling and King Road Mine, Aggregate AGGREGATE—WHAT WE MINE The King Road Mine will produce about 3 million tons a year of construction, grade aggregate—crushed limestone which is an essential CONDUCTING THE CONTROLLED MASS BLASTING ON THE LIMESTONE MINE No. 2, 2013 Mining & Metallurgy Engineering Bor 62 Limestone deposits belong to this classic gray sedimentary carbonate layered and banky rocks, and in a blasting process in limestone mines Exploxives Used In Limestone Mining. blasting process in limestone mines. can be used as limestone mining All crushed limestone in Michigan is mined in open quarries. drilling and blasting processes for limestone mining compamy of limestone. cebu mining company limestone. 5 Feb 214 Frasec Ventures Corporation loed in Cebu City, Philippines for the drilling, blasting, Quarrying Limestone, Agapito Associates Inc. — Mining & Civil Agapito Associates, Inc. (AAI) was contracted to conduct an investigation of a mine roof fall, review repair procedures, develop instrumentation recommendations drilling process limestone mining, MineVik Machinery limestone drilling process blasting process in limestone mines customer case. Mining Africa Jobs Board dedicated to the CA Mining Recruitment company to highlight North Aurora Limestone Mine To Test Effects Of Blasting Prompted by a recent increase in complaints about noise and vibration, the Conco, Western Stone Co. has commissioned a study of the effects of blasting at Open Pit Mining and Quarrying, Pits & Quarries, TechnoMine Here are the advatages and disadvantages of quarry mining that I took Granite Quarry Blasting; Stone Quarry Quarry Site Management Tools for Limestone Ozark Limestone Quarrying, Mining w/ Dexpan Chemical Stone Cutter Cost effective limestone quarrying, save on Valuable Stone. Limestone quarries mining with Dexpan Quarry chemical stone cutter in Ozark Rock Quarries. Drillers and Blasters, Surface Mining, Quarrying and Drillers in this unit group operate mobile drilling machines to bore blast holes in open, pit mines and quarries and to bore holes for blasting and for building good blasting practices limestone mining, crusher export This page is about good blasting practices limestone mining, click here to get more infomation about good blasting practices limestone mining. Environmental impact of blasting at Drenovac limestone quarry In present paper, the blast, induced ground motion and its effect on the neighboring structures are analyzed at the limestone quarry "Drenovac" in central part of Serbia. is limestone blasting process expensive limestone quarry blasting method, YouTube. Jun 19, 2013 blasting for stone crusherlimestone quarry blasting method Mining explosive for limestones quarryOzark blasting mining limestone blasting mining limestone. shot blasting machine manufacturer in coimbatore; limestone quarry drilling and blasting techniques; aluminum extrusion die cleaning sand drilling and blasting
Views: 697 Dacuk Porty
Exploring Abandoned Mines: The White Chief Mine – Part 3
 
16:21
This is the level where all of the workings of the mine on this side of the canyon come together! Some waste rock was pushed out in front of the various upper adits and open stopes of this abandoned mine, but the majority of the waste rock and all of the ore was dropped down through multiple ore passages until it hit this bottom level of the mine. From here, the ore and waste rock was carted out of the adit and either dumped outside (waste rock) or trucked away (the ore). There used to be rails extending out of the mine to the trestle that can be seen at the start of the video. The carts would carry the ore out to here and drop it into an ore bin, from which the ore would then be loaded into the trucks and taken away to a mill. I explore all of the different drifts and passageways on this level (which wasn’t easy as some of the ore chutes have poured rock and dirt that has tumbled down over the years into the adit, making it a very tight squeeze to get over) before we climb up a ladder alongside an ore chute into a series of large stopes and an ore passage. It is often difficult to get up into the spaces above an ore chute and so we were fortunate not only to be able to climb up, but also to find such interesting work had been done up there. Given that this mine has been preserved so well by the desert conditions, it was easy to figure out how the ore and waste rock had been transferred through this section into the waiting carts below. It was really interesting to explore each one of the levels of this mine and to see how they all connected together… ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 5330 TVR Exploring
drill and blast mining
 
09:44
I get to sample those holes, gee im lucky haha
Views: 51103 JasonGaugg
Exploring The Abandoned Monte Cristo Mine
 
23:28
This abandoned gold mine is near the bottom of an extremely remote and inaccessible canyon in California's Sierra Nevada mountain range. Although there was a rough trail to this mine at one time, most sections of the trail have been reclaimed by Mother Nature and hours of bushwhacking down a very steep canyon will be required for a visit (Of course, you can save yourself the hassle by simply watching the video). I do not know the history of this lode mine, but I have spoken to a local historian that visited it about twenty years ago. This is how I know about the second stamp mill and some other details. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 30012 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Yuba River Mines: Part 3
 
13:43
I can’t tell you anything more about the history of this particular mine along the Yuba River than what was written on the sign on the door... However, this whole area was mined pretty heavily in the early days of California’s “Gold Rush” and the original workings at this site appeared fairly old. I CAN tell you that Mr. McBride and I were curious about the waste rock piles that didn’t seem connected to anything and so we headed up the side of the canyon in the dark to investigate (there’s never enough daylight when exploring). The higher up we went, we kept finding large bolts embedded in rock outcroppings. So, like a sick version of Hansel & Gretel, Chuck and I followed these bolts higher and higher up the canyon wall through thick brush, poison oak and over steep rock faces. Eventually, we lost this trail of bolts at a sheer cliff. Our assumption was that we were following the remains of a tramway up and it would make sense for the bolts to stop at the cliff face because they would be on top if these bolts were actually supporting a tramway. So, although we haven’t seen it, we strongly suspect that there is another adit somewhere up on the canyon wall. There are plenty of rumors around about additional mines all along that stretch of the Yuba River. However, the brush is so thick now that it would be almost impossible to find them (the absence of roads and trails along the sides of the canyon doesn’t help either). So, we ran the clock out on the daylight at this last mine... However, if you’re curious as to where the road ended… Well, so were we. So, we came back on another day (with the dirt bikes this time) and went all of the way to the end. The “road” ends at a large boulder field created by a creek, but it was possible to tell where the road continued in the past through the thick woods (and thick poison oak). So, we continued on foot until we came to a large waste rock pile. At the base were the remains of a stamp mill and after scrambling up to the top through the thick brush, I came across the remains of a shaft that was flooded up to ground level. The water was almost completely black and so it was difficult to really gather anything about the state of the shaft. Several people have told us that there is a stone “Hobbit House” nearby, but we looked around a little while and didn’t find it. It was getting dark though and so we didn’t look for too long. The bikes don’t have headlights, but we normally use our miner’s headlamps to ride at night. So, no big deal that it was getting dark, right? Well, this time it was. When we got back to the bikes, none of our electronic devices would work. NONE of them. Lights wouldn’t work, phones wouldn’t turn on, cameras wouldn’t work – even the gas meters were acting weird. Fortunately, the bikes are kickstarted and so we were able to get them running. I got the hell out of there to catch the few shreds of light remaining in the day, but it got completely dark on the ride back. That’s a hard road in the daylight. So, at night it was downright sporty! When we got back to the truck all of our electronics worked perfectly. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 9383 TVR Exploring
Late 1800s Gold Mine With Steam Powered Elevator
 
37:33
Exploring old very dry mine with mystery steam engine powered elevator that drops 550 feet to a 50 foot offset then another 100 feet to the lower adit and exits the base of the mountain. We explore the top levels then the bottom. A fun video looking at the boilers hoists elevators hoists bats tunnels stopes shafts faults drifts square nails
Views: 21813 Mine Explorers
CAT 992G Loading Rock
 
02:20
Surface coal mine South of Frostburg, MD
Views: 22305 Jason L
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 4 – Doing The Twist
 
15:19
When I was working on the first videos in this series I remembered that this mine became safer after I crossed over the pits. However, when working on this video I was thinking, “Man, this isn’t any better at all!” At one point, you can even see a rock dropping down from the top of the adit. So, yes, this was a pretty bad abandoned mine all of the way through. At least for now, I believe it is the worst (least safe) lode mine that I have been inside. That is somewhat curious to me as all of the other iron mines I have been inside of have been very stable and safe. I suppose it just goes to show how many variations in circumstances can be presented by geology. I thought it was interesting how the path of the LHD twisted down so tightly inside of the mountain to reach the lower levels. LHDs are not exactly small, nimble machines and so I would imagine a pretty skilled operator (or operators) was running the LHD in here. The black water that ended our explorations on this upper adit is similar to the black water that halted my exploration of the lower adit as well. Does this mean the two levels connect somewhere or is it simply because whatever is staining the water is the same in both places? I would love to know the full extent of the workings at this mine, but I have only ever been able to locate a picture (in horribly low resolution) of a crude map of some of the workings. So, that wasn’t a lot of help. Unfortunately, it did reinforce the impression that I missed a small set of workings somewhere. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6012 TVR Exploring
What Is Overburden In Mining?
 
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https://goo.gl/6U6t22 - Subscribe For more Videos ! For more Health Tips | Like | Comment | Share : ▷ CONNECT with us!! #HealthDiaries ► YOUTUBE - https://goo.gl/6U6t22 ► Facebook - https://goo.gl/uTP7zG ► Twitter - https://twitter.com/JuliyaLucy ► G+ Community - https://goo.gl/AfUDpR ► Google + - https://goo.gl/3rcniv ► Visit us - http://healthaware.in/ ► Blogger - https://juliyalucy.blogspot.in/ Watch for more Health Videos: ► How To Avoid Unwanted Pregnancy Naturally: https://goo.gl/hRy93e ► Period Hacks || How To Stop Your Periods Early: https://goo.gl/dSmFgi ► Cold and Flu Home Remedies: https://goo.gl/biPp8b ► Homemade Facial Packs: https://goo.gl/NwV5zj ► How To Lose Belly Fat In 7 Days: https://goo.gl/EHN879 ► Powerfull Foods for Control #Diabetes: https://goo.gl/9SdaLY ► Natural Hand Care Tips At Home That Work: https://goo.gl/YF3Exa ► How to Tighten #SaggingBreast: https://goo.gl/ENnb6b ► Natural Face Pack For Instant Glowing Skin: https://goo.gl/gvd5mM ► Get Rid of Stretch Marks Fast & Permanently: https://goo.gl/ZVYvQZ ► Eating Bananas with Black Spots: https://goo.gl/gXuri6 ► Drink this Juice every day to Cure #Thyroid in 3 Days: https://goo.gl/L3537H ► How Garlic Improves Sexual Stamina? https://goo.gl/GNcbYU ► Benefits of using Egg Shells: https://goo.gl/hAUyUS ► Home Remedies to Gain Weight Fast: https://goo.gl/jBVVQh ► Amazing Benefits of Olive Oil for Health: https://goo.gl/R3583v ► Rapid Relief of Chest Pain (Angina): https://goo.gl/idAFZR ► Home Remedies for Joint & Arthritis Pains Relief: https://goo.gl/jRbNkh ► SHOCKING TRICKs For #Diabetes Control: https://goo.gl/ATDDsV ► Doctors Are Shocked! #Diabetics: https://goo.gl/ZeQddJ ► Home Remedies for Gastric Troubles: https://goo.gl/72VR1b ► Juice for #Diabetics Type 2: https://goo.gl/3vDMqR --------- 3 [title 36 parks, forests, and public property; Chapter i national park service, department of the interior; Part 6 solid waste disposal sites in units of the national park system. In the past, blasted overburden spoil was includes soil and rock that is removed to gain access ore deposits at open pit mines. Overburden generally has a low potential dragline large excavation machine used in surface mining to remove overburden (layers of rock and soil) covering coal seam. It is one of the largest mine operating costs and level overburden has a profound impact on performance. In the coal mining there are many processes that need to be done. Drilling and testing overburden removal stockpile segregation hauling land management arcilla featured service semcoa. The presence of spatially discrete, stiff roof units are one feature that has been linked to these events. This activity generates a huge quantity of overburden materials. Mining overburden means material overlying a mineral deposit that is removed to gain access. It is not subject to any chemical processes at the mine but needs be removed allow access ore. Appendix iii dynamic failures, or bumps, remain an imperative safety concern in underground coal mining, despite significant advancements engineering controls. Post mining fertility assessment and regraded. The overburden is removed and stockpiled for return to the mine pit when mining complete. The series of this process should be included in the local according to 36 cfr 6. Uslegal, inc topsoil and overburdenoverburden characteristics on dynamic failure in reclamation of coalmine overburden dump through environmental mine a case study blasting coal investigations for optimising removal open cut mines synergies definition meaning wordnika review utilisation waste as surface mining. Various literatures have reported the failure of open jan 23, 2008. As the de mand for coal in creases to meet country's energy requirements, companies are digging increasingly deeper into earth gain access. Backfilling, which is commonly known as stowing, provides stability of ground by preventing land subsidence, reducing mine fire and improving the surface coal mining involves disturbing overlying rock layers (overburden) to expose extract reserves using area method wherein overburden above uppermost seam innerburden between lower seams are removed in parallel strips (pits) across coalfield until. Overburden monitoring and suitability assessmentappendix i Parameters, analytical procedures criteria for topsoil overburden analyses evaluationtopsoil volume calculation example. Basically, the method consists of removing overburden above coal seam and then, starting at outcrop proceeding along hillside, creating a bench around hill. Opencast mines are the prime source of coal production in india. It is usually piled on the surface at mine sites where it will not impede further expansion of mining operation moving large volumes material expensive. Overburden removal s
Views: 525 Fredda Winkleman
Asteroid Mining
 
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This video continues our look at Colonizing Space by examining the idea of Asteroid Mining and setting up colonies on Asteroids. We explore the science as well as practical issues of engineering, economics, legality, and psychology of such distant outposts. Visit our Website: www.IsaacArthur.net Support the Channel on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthur Listen or Download the audio of this episode from Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/isaac-arthur-148927746/cs04b-asteroid-mining Spark Vizla Podcast Channle at Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/sparkvizla Cover Art by Jakub Grygier: https://www.artstation.com/artist/jakub_grygier
Views: 215679 Isaac Arthur
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 2
 
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In this next section of the abandoned limestone mine that we explored, we dropped down to the level below the one where we started exploring. The level shown in this video was the primary haulage adit for this section of the mine (meaning that all of the other levels of the mine dropped ore and waste rock down - or hauled ore and waste rock up - to this level to haul out). The reason for this is that this level of the mine is at “ground level” at the base of the cliff and it was, therefore, easy for trucks to drive into the adit to recover ore from the ore chutes and to remove waste rock. The upper levels had ore carts and track as it was, obviously, not practical to move large trucks up the cliffs – much easier to just drop all of the limestone down to the haulage adit. I was surprised to still be able to see the tire tracks from the trucks inside of the haulage adit after more than fifty years, but the ground was very hard and not muddy. So, it was almost as if the tracks were frozen there and I suspect they will still be there another fifty years from now. Some viewers have expressed surprise in the past over the presence of vehicles run by combustion engines inside of the mines (such as LHDs or trucks), but it is important to remember that the mines are very well ventilated and undoubtedly there was a blower outside of the mine blasting a steady stream of fresh air into the mine to prevent the dust and exhaust gases from becoming a problem for the miners. As was mentioned in the first video in this series, there are many levels at this section of the mine, but the others are accessible only by rope and are filled with waist-deep mud. Since we didn’t have waders or technical climbing gear with us that day, we opted to bypass those levels. Almost certainly, there was nothing much that we missed out on. Any artifacts would be hidden beneath the mud and the adits would look very similar to the first adit we ventured into. Also, as you’ll see in the next video, this series of levels is only one section of the mine. There are adits punching into this limestone cliff all over the place – at least a dozen or possibly even more. Many of them have eroded shut or are inaccessible without technical climbing gear (as described above). However, by hiking along the base of the cliff, we were able to locate an absolutely enormous adit – again at “ground level.” This was a new section of the limestone mine for Alessio too and that will comprise the third video in this series. Interestingly, not long ago, Alessio sent me a message indicating that he had returned to this abandoned mine with some other Italians and they had discovered even more levels at this site that we had not discovered before! So, this mountain of limestone was really turned into Swiss cheese (Emmental cheese for those of you outside the United States) by the Italian miners. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 3872 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Abandoned Crystal Palace Mine
 
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As I was struggling to explain in the video during my graceful, acrobatic leap off of the quartz ledge, a local historian advised us that during World War II, this abandoned mine was worked not for gold (which is what was originally mined here), but for its crystals that were used in radios. Google “crystal oscillator" if you’re curious how that works… During World War II, many American mines that extracted minerals such as gold and silver that were not considered essential to the war effort were ordered closed by the U.S. government. By contrast, mines that pursued tungsten or other such minerals (or crystals) were aggressively supported. Going farther back, there is a story the old-timers told in the past (unfortunately, these old hands are no longer with us) about a large group of Mexican miners that used to work an unknown section of the canyon where this mine is located. The story from the old-timers is that when the Mexican Revolution (which started in 1910) really started getting serious, that the Mexicans were compelled to return home. So, one day, an incredibly long mule train, loaded down with ore and equipment wound its way up and out of the canyon on the long trail back to Mexico. These Mexican miners never returned. I don’t know if that story is true (but it came from reliable sources) and I don’t know if the Mexican miners were working the quartz veins shown in this video. However, there are only four mines in this canyon and I KNOW it wasn’t two of those four. Therefore, it is a distinct possibility and it is worth mentioning, I believe. We were quite impressed by how extensively this quartz zone had been worked on both the surface and underground. Whether it was Mexican miners or someone else, they really worked this canyon thoroughly! I would love to see pictures of how it looked then. Early written descriptions of this mine indicate that a simple stamp mill was sufficient for milling the ore since the quartz veins harbor almost no sulfide. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 9459 TVR Exploring
Cat® K Series Large Wheel Loader Operator Training
 
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This Cat® K Series Large Wheel Loader Operator Training video is designed to provide operators basic proficiency for efficient machine operation. This video is also designed to provide the viewer with a fundamental understanding of machine operator safety, location and function of operator controls, start-up and shutdown procedures, and overall basic operating procedures.
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 1
 
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This is the first abandoned limestone mine I ever explored and it is a big one… As an essential ingredient in concrete, this mine was brought into existence together with a nearby concrete producer in 1910. Underground mining continued into the early 1960’s before the focus shifted to the open pit mining of limestone nearby. Although significantly remodeled over the years, the concrete production plant remains open. My exploring buddy for this day is Alessio (who introduced me to this site) and his exploring channel can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA As it is sedimentary, limestone is made up of the skeletal remains of countless living creatures such as coral and foraminifera. I suppose it is somewhat morbid to consider that when walking on a concrete sidewalk, for example, that we are tromping on the corpses of millions of living creatures. Taking it a step further, consider that limestone is a common ingredient in toothpaste as well! It’s labeled as calcium carbonate should you choose to examine your toothpaste. This mine is located in the region of Tuscany, which is more commonly associated with fine wine and historic cities such as Florence and Siena. However, I assure you that it has a very fine selection of abandoned mines as well. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 5118 TVR Exploring
JMAC 993K Caterpillar   WV surface mine
 
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993K Cat loading sand biscuits WV style
Views: 35083 gutwrench3
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 2 – Surprises On The Surface & Underground
 
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This sprawling abandoned mine kept giving as I went along, coming across another adit, a funicular, more mining equipment and more buildings to explore... Unfortunately, I also came across some pictures online that seemed to confirm my concern that I missed something at this mine due to the tangle of blackberry bushes. It wasn’t entirely clear since they mixed several mine sites together, but I came across a blog post from some Italian explorers that seemed to show an adit - with some ore carts inside - to the left of the upper and lower adits that I located and explored. The Italians indicated that it was not large and it may have been less overgrown when they visited, but I am still kicking myself for missing it (if I understood their material correctly). I would imagine that the lower adit I explore in this video connects somewhere to the workings accessed from the upper adit, but I was not able to confirm that as sections in both adits were inaccessible. The upper adit obviously utilized the LHD that we located and so, I suspect, that was where the most recent work took place. However, given the green plastic roofing inside of this lower adit, it can’t be THAT old. Really, given the evolution of this mine and its long life, it is difficult to tell when they worked certain parts of it and when they used some of the equipment as well as how everything worked together. For example, although rail led out from that upper adit, there was no rail inside of it. There are older and newer workings in the upper adit and they must have, at least, used rail when they were extracting minerals in the older workings. So, it seems that they removed the rail inside in favor of the LHD. So, did the LHD come out and load ore directly into carts outside? That doesn’t seem particularly efficient if that is the case. It might be that they dropped everything down to the lower haulage adit given the large waste rock pile and the ore bin down there. However, there was also an ore bin and tram station connected to the upper adit. Perhaps these were connected to the older workings in the upper adit? It is tough to determine the answers to these types of questions at times. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 11459 TVR Exploring
coal mining methods in india ppt
 
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More Details : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html PDF Coal Mining Economics Browse and Read Coal Mining Economics Coal Mining Economics Title Type coal mining economics PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF history of mining in the world coal mining methods in india Home solution coal mining methods in india ppt .In India, coal mining methods in india and coal mining methods in india . Coal mining. A coal mine in Bihar, Coal Mining Jobs Apply to 49 Coal Mining Jobs on Naukri.com, India's No.1 Job Portal. Featured Job Hot Job Preferred Employer Premium Job Crawled Job Photo Inside Presentation Inside. Mining-Induced Displacement and Resettlement: Social Problem The object of this paper is to present mining in India alone, mining The problem of compulsory resettlement is also a consequence of open pit coal mining industrial coal beneficiation methods coal mining methods in india ppt - Grinding Mill steps of coal beneficiation methods-ppt Description : Chapter 1: PDF Coal Mining Economics Browse and Read Coal Mining Economics Coal Mining Economics Title Type coal mining economics PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF history of mining in the world coal mining methods pdf 2.3 Coal mining methods in India Chapter 3 Coal mining aggregate crushing process ppt. ecr minerals time bomb. convert 400 tons of quarry stone into cubic metre. coal mining process in india ppt ? rutile sand mining process rutile sand mining machine for sale ? underground mining construction ppt ? coal mining methods in india ppt . Underground Mining Equipment Market authorSTREAM Presentation Description Based on application of underground mining equipment market is classified into coal mining Increasing mining activities in India PDF Coal Mining Economics Browse and Read Coal Mining Economics Coal Mining Economics Title Type coal mining economics PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF history of mining in the world equipment for mines in india N G Nair - Under Ground Mechanized Mining Methods. N G Nair Mining Engineer from Copper Mines in India. COAL MINING IN INDIA : AN OVERVIEW - Fossil Energy. PDF Economic liabilities of environmental pollution by coal Coal India 2005). About 90% of the total estimated coal reserves, methods, depth of coal mining, coal quality and entrapped gas content in the coal seams coal mining 1800s presentation powerpoint opencast coal mining ppt . 2006Traditional underground coal mining in India is by Bord Students describe the methods of mining coal. COAL Ppt Presentation coal mining various methods Home solution coal mining methods in india ppt .In India, Missing School to Work in the Minemodern trends in construction materials and techniques pptView more . The accident analysis of mobile mine machinery in Indian The trends of coal production, share of mining methods in production, machinery deployment in open cast mines, India/epidemiology coal beneficiation methods ... zenithia Tech U.S.-India 6th Coal zenith Machine steps of coal beneficiation methods-ppt 120 t FGX sorters for dry coal beneficiation at its mining process of coal mining in india Mining Methods ulliCoal is mined by two main Coal mining in India has a long history of commercial exploitation covering nearly 220 years starting in 1774 PDF History Mining Industry history of coal mining PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF open pit mining techniques PDF mining engineering salary PDF neoliberalism and mining in africa PDF PDF History Mining Industry history of coal mining PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF open pit mining techniques PDF mining engineering salary PDF neoliberalism and mining in africa PDF PDF Mining Economics Ppt Mining Economics Ppt Title Type mining economics ppt PDF coal mining economics PDF underground mining methods ppt PDF underground mining methods pdf PDF
Views: 153 Roberts K
Incredibly Rare Wooden Ore Cart Found Inside A Mine!
 
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Well, we certainly don’t come across something like this every day when we’re out exploring… Just like the abandoned steam engine we featured in another video, this is one of those incredible once in a lifetime finds. There are precious few of these wooden ore carts left in existence and even fewer that can still be found at an abandoned mine rather than rotting away in someone’s backyard. Fortunately, this mine is not marked on any topographic maps and it is in a very remote area of the desert. I believe this is what has protected it from the vermin that ransack these sites to sell the historical artifacts on eBay. Were it not for these circumstances, the wooden ore cart would have undoubtedly disappeared a long time ago. We have found bits and pieces of the metal frames of wooden ore carts in and around some of the old (1800s) mines in California’s “Mother Lode” region. So, obviously, they were used there. However, the wood has long since rotted away and whatever was left of the abandoned carts has disintegrated with time and exposure to the elements. If you consider it, wooden ore carts actually made a lot of sense for the miners in the past that were venturing out over steep mountains and down deep canyons, often over little more than primitive trails. Rather than needing to use a team of mules to haul a backbreakingly heavy metal ore cart up a sheer cliff to a mine, the miners could have hauled out the relatively lightweight (except for the wheels) components and then assembled the carts from the plentiful trees growing around the mine. And, as was mentioned in the video, if something breaks, the miners could just cut another tree down and repair the cart. From the look of it, the wooden ore cart at this mine in the video may have likewise been constructed from the trees found around the mine. As for the mine itself, which was almost an afterthought for me after finding the wooden ore cart, it wasn’t a huge mine, but I thought it was an interesting little mine all the same, no? The flickering effect created by the LEDs on the video drove me nuts when I was editing it, but focusing on the features of the mine, I liked the way the mine twisted around until it reached that small raise and the winze. Given how clean this first section of the mine was, I can only conclude that that section is the one that was worked most recently and the area behind the skip car (where the rails for the ore carts disappeared) was driven during the early days of the mine and then abandoned. I don’t blame the miners for abandoning that section of the mine given how soft the material there was. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 78430 TVR Exploring
loading equipments for open pit mining
 
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More Details : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html May 07, 2016· BIG Heavy Equipments Working In Antamina Open Pit , Hitachi EX5500 Excavator Loading 789 Dump Truck Open Pit Mining , Open Cast Mining . Equipment Selection for Surface Mining: , for large-scale open pit mining in particular, , Equipment Selection 4 loading Mining Equipment Costs , Mining Equipment Fleet Capital & Operating Costs 10,000 tpd (ore + waste) open pit , The Mining Cost Service Manual contains only . ? open pit pond iron ore; Home; Our Capability; solutions; , Open-pit mining – Wikipedia, , loading and hauling Under discussion is the equipment for open pit mining of scarce coal reserv , Equipment used for contour stripping is smaller in size and load capacity than that Equipments For Chromite Mining FENGCHAN heavy mining machinery , open pit mining equipment for sale Description : . Mining Equipment Parts Vikayonline is a Global Supplier of Mining Equipment and Mining Equipment Parts for Open Pit Mining and Underground Mining, , Large open-pit mining operations , our experts developed a special drives control library for all mining equipment that allows you to manage load-sharing . open cast mining machinery list Open Cast Mining Equipment , open pit coal mining equipment and machinery Open Pit , wintex trading company mining coal , loading and hauling process in mining shovel , Description and images of equipment used for loading and hauling of , Planning Open Pit Mining Operations . , Ventilation, air contaminant control equipment, protective respiratory equipment and air quality monitoring , Mining & Milling Open Pit [Guidelines] Bulk materials handling in mining , The load carrying capacities , Continuous open pit mining equipment TRANSPORT CRAWLERS . 1 –In an open pit operation a , 4 –Large electric or hydraulic shovels scoop up blasted rock and load into haul trucks , Open Pit Mining 2012pptx May 07, 2016· BIG Heavy Equipments Working In Antamina Open Pit , Hitachi EX5500 Excavator Loading 789 Dump Truck Open Pit Mining , Open Cast Mining . pdf on mining loading and hauling equipments UNDERGROUND LOADING AND HAULING Load, haul, dump , Shovels are used in open pit mining as primary loading equipment Modern Open Pits Posted by Matrix on , He explained the visions is that "our large open-pit mining , equipment loading is safe and secure while also taking . Open-pit mining, also known as opencast mining, open-cut mining, and strip mining, , Mining Equipments; Mining Techniques; Mining Videos; Standardized emissions inventory methodology for open pit mining, , The results , blasting and dynamic loading and finally the time factors (Coates, . Download mining equipment stock photos , #26960211 - wheel loader excavator machine loading dumper truck at sand , #48534694 - Open pit mining of coal wit , copper mining major equipments , loading and haulage equipment and , A major factor in the decision to operate by underground mining rather than open pit . navachab gold mine loading equipments , SBM as one of the largest mining and crushing equipments , Open pit mining operations utilize large scale and . Jan 16, 2017· Researchmoz added Most up-to-date research on "Global Market For Dolomite Mining And Equipments , Loading in , 5 × 1 of 6 , A quarry is a form , Vikay Mining Equipments is a Global Supplier of New Aftermarket Replacement Mining Equipment Parts for Opencast Mining , Open Pit Mining Equipment Parts: , equipments used in copper mining is manufactured from , equipment used in open pit mining of , The XSM is the professional mining equipments . Open Pit Mining Equipment,Buy Quality Open Pit Mining Equipment , Open Pit Mining Equipment, , BC936 3 ton woods loading front end loader,open pit mining equipment In open-pit mining loading equipment is matched with haul trucks that can be , ? Get Price Coal Mining Technologies What Are the Different Types of Surface Mines? . Open-pit mining: Definition from , Front-end loaders are used for all loading at smaller mines, , some of the Open Cast Mining Equipments are Rock Drills, . Mining Equipments Solution Stone Crushing Sand Making Ore Processing , Open pit mining may be used when very large quantities of material are mined, . , surface mining, open pit mining, open cast mining, placer mining, solution , loading, ditching , S
T1255III Terrain Leveler Surface Excavation Machine - ConExpo 2014
 
01:54
The Vermeer T1255 Terrain Leveler direct drive attachment combines raw cutting productivity with the ability to carefully extract what you're after when it comes to surface mining. With the drive motor mounted directly to the cutter drum, it maximizes work efficiency and reduces wear costs associated with other types of transmissions. Hydraulic low-speed, high-torque motors on each side of the cutter head dish out more direct drive power for improved productivity. The direct drive attachment offers a maximum cutting depth of 21" (53.3 cm). Learn more about Vermeer terrain leveler surface excavation equipment: http://www2.vermeer.com/vermeer/NA/en/N/equipment/terrain_leveler_sem
Views: 1027 Vermeer
Underground Forest Of Timbers In Abandoned Mine – Part 2
 
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As I mentioned in the first video, the primary focus on our visit to this abandoned copper mine was to explore the, apparently, undocumented upper adits. They were both interesting and impressive and I am glad that I visited them (although I regret not taking a closer look at one of them that I thought was impossible to enter, but WAS actually possible as I found out later). However, I was unable to resist taking a quick look inside the main section of this mine… That would be the 250 level and is the focus of this video. I initially just went in to the 250 level for a bit in order to rush on to the upper adits before it got dark. However, when we came to accept that, no matter what, we were going to be riding our motorcycles back in the dark without headlights, the time pressure was lifted from us and we returned to the 250 level in the main section of the mine for a closer look. According to the records we located, this mine was worked on at least 6-7 levels and had in excess of two miles of underground workings. Yes, two miles of underground workings is not a typo. The miners pursued the copper ore quite aggressively through multiple adits, a deep shaft, open stopes and even surface work. Despite the extensive amount of work – and quite professional work – it appears that almost all of the work at this mine was conducted for just a decade or so after 1916. In that time, the miners reportedly extracted more than one million dollars worth of copper (and don’t forget, those are 1920s dollars). If you are curious as to what the entire mine looks like, I would heartily suggest following the links below… Although there is overlap, each of us also focused on different parts of the mine. So, putting all of the videos together provides a VERY complete picture of this mine: Mines of the West does a thorough, level-by-level series on this mine: Part 1: https://youtu.be/jFGAxzJyk5g Part 2: https://youtu.be/y_2kgq9dx4s Part 3: https://youtu.be/RKxMV8G1ZcM Jake covers the inside, of course, and does a good job of it, but also covers the hill above the main part of the mine that none of the rest of us covered at all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8-jMpJin6E Mr. McBride, both informative and entertaining, does a broad overview of the highlights of this abandoned mine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYfsiEjgZpU If I missed anyone, please let me know, so that I can update this section… Again, teamwork will get all of these mines explored and documented! ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19287 TVR Exploring
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada - Part 1
 
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Probably less than a dozen people know about the historic miner’s cabin hidden away on this mining claim - and even fewer still know about the abundance of gold mines found here… It remains a secret because the people that do know where this is remain tight-lipped about it and this cabin and mines are located in an absolute black hole on topographic and other maps. There is simply nothing marked anywhere near here. With the contractors for the Forest Service, BLM, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) programs, et al working overtime (with taxpayer money) to get all of these historic mines erased, it is very nice to be introduced to some gold mines that are not (currently) in danger of being permanently closed. It is a shame that we have to wallow in such secrecy simply to protect a historically significant site from the very entities that should be preserving it, but such is the upside down world we live in. The two adits featured in this video appear to be quite old. I was able to find a couple of references to the mines consolidated on this claim in mining journals dating back to the turn of the last century and they were described as already having been worked for a while at that time. So, initial work here probably dates back to around the time of California’s “Gold Rush” era. The earliest gold miners in California were placer miners. However, when the easy pickings from the surface were worked out, they became lode miners and headed underground to start chasing the veins where the gold in the creeks originated from (some underground miners also chased the rich placer left behind by ancient river channels that were buried millions of years ago). The little hole by the creek under the huge boulder would have been referred to as a “coyote hole” by the miners of the time. These were in abundance along the creeks and rivers of California in the early days as the miners pursued gold flakes and nuggets back into the rocks and gravel lining the waterways. So, it seems likely that the small adit we visited first would have been the one developed initially and then the larger adit punching into the hard rock would have come along later. In further support of the idea that these mines are older rather than newer is that, although it may possibly have been there at one point, there was no sign of rail at the mines we visited. The claim owner also stated that he has never seen any sign of rail here either. It is not difficult to imagine a swarm of miners crawling all over these canyon walls like ants during the “Gold Rush” era, churning up the creeks and digging out coyote holes. This initial surge of miners, however, would have been followed by a more patient, more sophisticated group of miners that had an eye on heading underground. At the second adit shown in this video, for example, you could have had something like a father and son team or two brothers slowly working away at that lode mine for years, chasing those quartz veins and hauling load after load of ore and waste rock out in wheelbarrows. I’m giving more of a general feel for the area with these videos rather than showing every single bit of mining history present as both sides of this canyon are covered in mines and the remains of mining equipment. We’ll see more of that in the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines that I have explored: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 27177 TVR Exploring