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OPEN CAST MINING METHODS
 
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Subject :GEOLOGY Course :ENERGY RESOURCES AND MINERAL EXPLORATIONS Keyword : SWAYAMPRABHA
Cat® HW300 Highwall Mining System -- Product Video
 
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Linking underground and surface mining operations, the Cat® Highwall Mining System is a testament to versatile mining equipment. The Cat HW300 offers a safe and innovative method for extracting coal from outcropping seams in a multitude of applications. The industry-leading Cat highwall mining system is a new, low-cost addition to traditional mining methods. The system can produce 40 000-110 000 tonnes (44,000-121,000 tons) of coal per month, depending on seam height. Capable of full operation with a three to four-man crew, the Cat highwall mining system averages 27-36 tonnes (30-40 tons) per man-hour. Learn more at https://mining.cat.com/products/surface-mining/highwall-miner
Exploring Italy's Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 1 - (Lots Of) Surface Buildings & Equipment
 
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I wasn’t sure what to expect when it came to exploring abandoned mines in Italy, but I did not expect them to be as impressive as they have turned out to be… This series will be the first of several abandoned mines in Italy that I have explored – and one of these was the best abandoned mine that I have ever explored by a significant margin! There will be four videos in this series on the Monte Arsiccio Mine. For the rockheads, there is some interesting geology present at the Monte Arsiccio Mine. The basic deposits here are barite, pyrite and iron oxides. However, within these deposits, geologists have located routhierite (a rare sulfosalt) as well as ankangite, a rare member of the hollandite structural family (Google it if you wish to know more about the geology at this abandoned mine as there is plenty of geological research and reports out there on this site that are in English). It was difficult to find much in the way of records on this mine (outside of the geology), but, as I understand it, the most recent operations at this mine ceased in 1989. This abandoned mine is on public land in Italy. It is not private property and it is not in the middle of nowhere. It is in the Apuan Alps in Tuscany and is near a fairly large population center. Therefore, it was absolutely incredible to me to see how much equipment was still at this mine and also to even see the entrances to the mine open at all. As impressive as this site is, I’m afraid that I might have missed some things. The blackberries and vines could easily have hidden the entrance to another adit somewhere or covered up some fantastic equipment. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19717 TVR Exploring
Strip Mining for Coal
 
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Mining for Coal in Stellarton on Nov.6 2012.
Views: 72533 JimHowDigsDirt
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 4: To The Top
 
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At the beginning of this video, once I had checked out the base of that massive room and pillar complex where the solitary ore cart was, I was operating under the assumption that I was almost finished exploring this massive abandoned mine. As you’ll see, that assumption could not have been more incorrect. Of course, that is actually how most assumptions tend to turn out, but we’ll not get off track here discussing life lessons... When I started the climb up, it had been my intention to simply show a different perspective from the top of that huge gallery of pillars in order to try and demonstrate just how massive it was. However, to my surprise, there was a lot more up at the top of the mine. With the amount of activity up there, I wonder why the miners did not just extend the cavern containing the gallery of pillars up more to include the workings they so extensively drifted through? Perhaps they were concerned about the structural integrity of the mountain by that point? But, couldn’t they have turned that whole gallery into one massive open stope? After all, the miners did actually reach the outside world at the top of the mountain. This is all speculation on my part and I am just a layperson. Perhaps one of the experienced miners or mining engineers in the audience can answer some of these questions? As mentioned in previous video descriptions, iron and barite were the primary minerals mined at Buca della Vena. Iron, as most everyone knows, is reddish in color and we can see that in abundance throughout the mine. Barite, however, is not a mineral I am familiar with. Perhaps those shades of blue we also see throughout the mine represent the barite? Can one of the geologists in the audience answer that question? I have smart viewers and I appreciate them frequently sharing their expertise for the benefit of the rest of us! ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13665 TVR Exploring
Let's Blast!
 
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NOTE: Although this video shows an up-close look at the blasting process, NEVER go near an active surface mine or blast site without Federal training and permission. FYI, the white bags are Emulsified Ammonium Nitrate. The read cap is TNT and the silver rod that is connected to it by the yellow wire is the blasting cap, it's what ignites the shot. The white pebbles that are emptied into the blast holes by the powder trucks are the main explosive- "ANFO" or Ammonium Nitrate, which is a mixture of fertilizer and diesel fuel. Once the holes are filled with explosives, rock fines or "stemming" is pushed back in the holes and packed down to keep the explosives under pressure. After all the holes are loaded and rigged up, it's time for the fireworks! And remember kids, don't try this at home! Want to see more Blasting? Join the PAmining Channel and Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/PAmining/164948266897468
Views: 5778948 PAmining
Drilling and Blasting Introduction
 
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Shot, Edit, Voiced, Produced - An Introduction to Drilling and Blasting in the Construction Industry
Views: 32597 BenHiggins28
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 1: Most Awesome Mine I’ve Ever Explored
 
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I have explored literally hundreds of abandoned mines now and some of them have been quite impressive on many levels. However, none have been as impressive as this abandoned mine: the Buca della Vena Mine… What makes this the best abandoned mine I have ever explored? It has everything we love in wonderful abundance - intact mining equipment left everywhere, complex underground workings (this isn’t just some boring haulage adit), a fantastic setting, interesting geology, multiple mining techniques on display, it hasn’t been picked over by a lot of people and isn’t under threat from American federal agencies that thrive on destroying historical abandoned mines, etc. Often, there is a certain feeling of relief upon exiting an abandoned mine and becoming reacquainted with fresh air and sunlight. However, I was genuinely sorry to leave this mine and went back through parts of it again on the excuse of making sure that I hadn’t missed any sections. That said, I did not climb up into every single stope and I did not have the ropes that would have been needed in order to be able to access a couple of chambers. So, given how much was in the rest of this mine, there could still be incredible discoveries to be made up in those little chambers and pockets. “Buca della Vena” translates literally into Italian as “hole of the vein.” “Vein” in this context is a reference to blood and, when you see the inside of this mine, I think you’ll agree that it was named well. The information online regarding the location of this mine is inaccurate. So, with just a rough idea where it was, I parked at the bottom of the canyon below the mine and charged straight up the side of the cliffs. As it turned out, this was the most difficult way possible. I was fighting through thorn-infested blackberry thickets on almost vertical slopes and at one point I actually had to climb a tree to get up the canyon since it was so steep (Bear in mind, I’m doing this while carrying 50 pounds of mine exploring equipment in my pack). I eventually reached a trail that led me to the remains of a tram system. At that point, I thought I had reached the mine, but I had actually just discovered an old stone house high up on the cliffs that was served by the small tram. So, I had to backtrack down the trail and continue fighting and struggling up the canyon walls until I finally reached level ground where the ore cart rail for the mine ran. Of course, once I reached the Buca della Vena Mine, I discovered that there was an easy trail leading up to the mine that ended up starting less than a hundred feet from where I had parked. One silver lining to the rough route I took though was that I passed by several sites with ancient Roman workings. I’ll talk more about the geology of the mine in the description for the next video... ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 22796 TVR Exploring
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 2: Discovered Underground Mine Train!
 
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Sure, we’ve come across ore carts and trammers before while exploring at abandoned mines. However, finding an intact underground mine train parked with the ore carts still hooked up to the trammer (what miners call the electric locomotive) is something that I have never seen before or since. I’ll give away some of the secrets of the upcoming videos by saying that there is a second part to this train just a short distance farther down the track. I wonder if the operator of the trammer/locomotive felt a twinge of sadness when it was parked underground for the last time? I mentioned in the description and comments of the last video that I would talk more about the history and geology of the abandoned mine in this description. The below is a translation from Italian to English and the translation is not perfect. However, it conveys the relevant information. So, quoting directly, here you go.. “The Buca della Vena Mine (formerly Stazzema Mine) was part of the 15th-16th century Vene Ferralis, although it is believed that works were held there already during the Medicean period. Work restarted between 1850 and 1860, and in 1938 the Pignone of Florence company began excavating. Since 1957, the SIMA company (subsidiary of EDEM) continued to work regularly in the tunnel searching mixed mineral barite-pyrite until 1990. The field is described as a mineral body almost unique with barite, pyrite and iron oxides of good quality. It is oriented NNE/SSW, in the contact zone between shale Unit Fornovolasco, white dolomite and grezzoni. Considerable scientific interest was aroused by the discovery of rare or unique in the world mineralogical species. Minerals mainly extracted are: - barite used for chemicals, pharmaceuticals, petroleum industry and as nuclear power plants insulation - pyrite for chemicals and iron and steel - iron oxides for steel products” Although the mine being explored in this video apparently dates back to the Medicean period, I passed ancient workings while pushing up the canyon walls that date back to the Romans and even the Etruscans. In other words, the iron ore deposits here have not exactly been a secret for thousands of years. The section of the Buca della Vena Mine featured in this video hosted very dark rock and huge open chambers. So, even with multiple lights, it was a struggle to fully illuminate it. While there are certainly some even more impressive pillars and massive chambers to come, the rock is lighter and so that should not be much of an issue going forward. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 20958 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Abandoned Monte Cristo Mine
 
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This abandoned gold mine is near the bottom of an extremely remote and inaccessible canyon in California's Sierra Nevada mountain range. Although there was a rough trail to this mine at one time, most sections of the trail have been reclaimed by Mother Nature and hours of bushwhacking down a very steep canyon will be required for a visit (Of course, you can save yourself the hassle by simply watching the video). I do not know the history of this lode mine, but I have spoken to a local historian that visited it about twenty years ago. This is how I know about the second stamp mill and some other details. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 41533 TVR Exploring
Basics of open pit mining
 
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Free Download PDF: http://j.gs/8AY6 For more visit: http://miningpresentations.blogspot.com/ Informative presentation you came across to know about Open Pit mining. Open Pit mining MINING Methods Hydraulic Gassification Opencast mining Open cut Mining Surface or Strip Mining final pit, weather Land degradation by mining Deforestation Pollution water Air Land Noise workings Workings Deeper Depths cities and under sea/rivers The quarried area. I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (http://www.youtube.com/upload) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Description des principales gemmes: Le Diamant C" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHgeOkr5IZM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 25264 Mining presentations
best method for mining manganese
 
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Onlin Service : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html This Channel Have Equipments Working Video : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCODZi6acoXcbt0nQmneh6Og 3 Technologies in Exploration, Mining, and Processing The three major components of mining (exploration, mining, and processing) .. Surface mining is a generic term describing several methods of mining .. Current practice is to extract only the best portion of the seam with available equipment. .. leaching not only uranium and copper but also gold, lead, and manganese,Manganese - ErametCOMILOG operates the mine at Moanda in Gabon. Once extracted and prepared, the ore is used in various ways: it is immediately sold to consumers.Manganese in Australia Investing News NetworkMay 16, 2017 Mining manganese in Australia can be challenging, but a few It uses open-cut strip mining methods at the site, which produces more than 15Manganese in Australia Investing News NetworkMay 16, 2017 Mining manganese in Australia can be challenging, but a few It uses open-cut strip mining methods at the site, which produces more than 15What Is Involved in Manganese Mining? - wiseGEEKJul 2, 2018 Open-pit mining is often preferred for manganese mining. Manganese mining often requires a specific method of extraction, because nodulesManganese : Manganese Ore Sorting - TomraOur ore sorting equipment can treat large volume of manganese ores in a dry process in size We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. The mining industry consumes 2%-3% of the world's energy.Manganese Mining - Encyclopedia of ArkansasJun 6, 2017 The mining of manganese ore was a very important economic activity in Arkansas between 1849 and 1959. The first commercial exploitation of manganese was by Colonel Matthew Martin. Between 1848 . Helpful TipsManganese Minerals Eduion CoalitionManganese (element #25, symbol Mn) is a gray-white metal with a pinkish around the world are open-pit mines using standard equipment and methods forManganese Mining Stocks, Companies, Prices and NewsFeb 28, 2018 Comprehensive information on Manganese stocks, mining companies and prices. The latest Manganese investment information and news.Manganese - WikipediaManganese is a chemical element with symbol Mn and atomic number 25. It is not found as a In biology, manganese(II) ions function as cofactors for a large variety of .. The CIA once used mining manganese modules on the ocean floor as a . The best-known manganese-containing polypeptides may be arginase, theHow to Mine Cobalt Without Going to Congo - BloombergNov 30, 2017 Recycling techniques can draw metal from lithium-ion batteries the president of American Manganese, which is patenting a method to drawAssmang Manganese Mines, Northern Cape Province - Mining Assmang's manganese mines are in the north of South Africa's Northern Cape Both mines are underground operations, using the room-and-pillar method.Merioneth Manganese: Mining, processing and transportMining, processing and transport in the disused manganese mines of the Meirionnydd appear to have been used at a number of mines to take waste to tips.Manganese moves in train - Mining JournalDec 1, 2016 The price of manganese hit a multi-year high of more than US$9 per dry metric tonne unit this week, 400% higher than a few months ago, butManganese Ore Trading and MiningNov 16, 2011 However, the total quantity of manganese ore produced by our 2 mines in January to June half of Best regards, ? What equipment do you have in your two mines ? and 90,000 Tones of what grade Mn% , Fe%, SiO2% , ?.How to Invest in Manganese CommodityHQThis metal is best known for its uses in the steel industry for creating alloys; manganese can There is 1 way to invest in Manganese: Stocks. Stocks Most companies who mine for manganese are diversified mining companies who maintainMINING THE WEALTH OF THE OCEAN DEEP - The New York TimesJul 17, 1977 But the immediate commercial focus is on manganese nodules, strewn across He is now developing a promising method of ocean mining. . The best nodule fields in the world, both for quantity of nodules and quantity ofImpact of open manganese mines on the health of children dwelling May 6, 2011 The children from the Mn-mining region also had increased salivary Mn (II) ions function as cofactors for a number of enzymes in higherA comprehensive approach for a techno-economic assessment of The comprehensive approach has been validated
Views: 2 Tala Danner
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 3
 
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After following the drift we ended the last video with to its surprising conclusion, we started moving back toward the main hub of this enormous abandoned mine. Along the way, we explored many of the side passages and raises that were bypassed on the route in through the main haulage adit located in this part of the mine. Following the very long hike up and out of the mine, we set up our camp for the night (we spent all day underground in this mine) and then headed above the mine to see some of its more interesting features above ground. You’ll see that we explore some of the mine buildings, including one that has an amazing collection inside of it. Although I was curious about what was inside of the modern mine buildings we discovered, I also had a specific destination in mind. One of my exploring buddies – Adit Addicts – had spotted what appeared to be a steam shovel abandoned above the modern mine we explored in this video. I wanted to see this machine to confirm what it was and also to film it if it really did turn out to be a steam shovel. As with the mine itself, it was quite a hike up into the hills above it. Fortunately, I was able to find the machine (although the GPS took me on a terrible route to do so) and it was indeed a steam shovel. Sort of... It was a steam shovel at one time, but had actually been converted over to run on an internal combustion motor. I had never seen anything like that before and it was pretty amazing to see one out in the desert mountains still next to the pile of dirt it had been excavating decades ago. The modern abandoned mine featured in this video is definitely not the first mine in this area and when looking around above the mine, it was fairly common to see old collapsed adits and old surface mining work. Many of these seemed to be more exploratory in nature though. This area has historically been a large producer of ores containing lead, copper and silver and a thriving town was once supported by the mines. However, today, there is almost no trace left of the ghost town or an aerial tramway that also used to be here. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 114752 TVR Exploring
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 2 – Surprises On The Surface & Underground
 
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This sprawling abandoned mine kept giving as I went along, coming across another adit, a funicular, more mining equipment and more buildings to explore... Unfortunately, I also came across some pictures online that seemed to confirm my concern that I missed something at this mine due to the tangle of blackberry bushes. It wasn’t entirely clear since they mixed several mine sites together, but I came across a blog post from some Italian explorers that seemed to show an adit - with some ore carts inside - to the left of the upper and lower adits that I located and explored. The Italians indicated that it was not large and it may have been less overgrown when they visited, but I am still kicking myself for missing it (if I understood their material correctly). I would imagine that the lower adit I explore in this video connects somewhere to the workings accessed from the upper adit, but I was not able to confirm that as sections in both adits were inaccessible. The upper adit obviously utilized the LHD that we located and so, I suspect, that was where the most recent work took place. However, given the green plastic roofing inside of this lower adit, it can’t be THAT old. Really, given the evolution of this mine and its long life, it is difficult to tell when they worked certain parts of it and when they used some of the equipment as well as how everything worked together. For example, although rail led out from that upper adit, there was no rail inside of it. There are older and newer workings in the upper adit and they must have, at least, used rail when they were extracting minerals in the older workings. So, it seems that they removed the rail inside in favor of the LHD. So, did the LHD come out and load ore directly into carts outside? That doesn’t seem particularly efficient if that is the case. It might be that they dropped everything down to the lower haulage adit given the large waste rock pile and the ore bin down there. However, there was also an ore bin and tram station connected to the upper adit. Perhaps these were connected to the older workings in the upper adit? It is tough to determine the answers to these types of questions at times. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 17603 TVR Exploring
How To Find Abandoned Mines
 
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So, you want to know how to find a specific abandoned mine or abandoned mines in general? We will dive into answering that question in this video by taking you along on our search for an abandoned mine that took us two years to locate! Along the way you’ll have the opportunity to observe the tools and techniques we use to find the historic mines that appear in our videos and you will, hopefully, be able to incorporate some of what we have learned over the years (and are now sharing with you) into your own search for mines and mine sites. I will cover how we find out about mines in the first place, the research that we do, the online resources we utilize, the technology we take out in the field with us and more. Whether you are a historian or a gold miner looking for promising sites to file claims on or a mine explorer interested in documenting our industrial heritage or are just curious what is around the area where you live, this video will, hopefully, have something useful for you. Some of you will obviously already know many, if not all, of these search techniques. However, this video is intended to have something for everyone – from the novice to the experienced mine hunter. Many people have no interest at all in finding lost mines, but enjoying seeing them and the efforts of others to find them, and so I have included the footage of the mine when we finally found it for that demographic as well. Fortunately, we don’t normally have to work this hard to find an abandoned mine, but if our search for this mine, although quite unpleasant and frustrating at times, was useful to someone else out there, then it was worth it. Happy hunting! Here are the links for the websites mentioned in this video: https://thediggings.com/ caltopo.com http://www.mylandmatters.org/ http://www.westernmininghistory.com/ https://www.google.com/earth/ https://goldrushexpeditions.com/ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21766 TVR Exploring
Rock Mining (Quarrying) Process
 
01:37:37
Hillsides explode, massive blocks of stone break off of solid rock walls and powerful machines crush large rocks in a matter of seconds. One mile of a two-la. Hillsides explode, massive blocks of stone break off of solid rock walls and powerful machines crush large rocks in a matter of seconds. One mile of a two-la. 250 300 tph hard rock processing plant for mining, quarrying, aggregate More details: Get the price of machines: http. zenith is an internationally renowned manufacturer of mining machinery Equipment Co., Ltd. Shanghai zenith .
Views: 700899 Documentary Lab
Interesting Discoveries At The Crown Point Gold Mine…
 
21:56
As you may have gathered from the early parts of this video, one has to work a little to get to the end of the canyon where these historic mines are located. Aside from the great scenery, the upside in that, of course, is that these mines remain relatively undisturbed. Thus, it was our good fortune to be left with all of the oddities, uniqueness and curiosities we saw at this site. I wish that we were always so fortunate! The earliest records I could find on these historic mines dates back to claim paperwork from 1857. However, according to my research, the powerhouse and other buildings all seem to date back to the turn of the last century (pre-WWI). The powerhouse (that was turned into a bunkhouse) supplied electricity to the entire area. The remains of the solid bridge, the excellent rock terracing, the historic mining equipment and historical electrical equipment as well as the quality and extent of the buildings at the end of the canyon indicate that this was quite the prosperous hive of activity in the past. That is definitely the first time I have ever seen antique Pelton wheels at a mine… By the standards of the time, the miners here must have had a very high standard of living. Consider, the standard of living was higher then than now! They could have comfortably driven vehicles back there in the past and they, obviously, had abundant electricity. No electricity and no vehicles now… I suppose one still has the beautiful creek cascading into the canyon though. The old mine and mining camp across the river seemed like an idyllic spot and it certainly made us curious. Maybe one day we’ll get an invitation and can see more of it and learn more than the small amount of information I was able to uncover… I’m also very curious as to what we missed inside of the mine. The air flow in there was tremendous, which means there was a passage to the outside world somewhere. The area past the “gate ladders” was blocked and so the passage to the outside could only have been in the stope. However, I saw no sign of daylight while I was there. So, that would suggest that the stope ran farther back than I perceived at the time. It is disappointing to be that close to a goal, but to not be able to accomplish it. The second location we visited – the one with the black water in the flooded shaft – is on the same watershed as the first location, but is down a different canyon. I could locate no records on that mine and do not even know the name of it. The size of the waste rock pile and the presence of the stamp mill is evidence that it was a sizeable operation, but it must have been an early one given the lack of information about it. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 47859 TVR Exploring
Impressive Woodwork In The Abandoned Upper Butte Mine
 
17:54
As can be plainly seen by the diminished status of the portal, it won’t be long before this mine is no longer accessible. Given the activity of the seasonal creek and the significant amounts of water that pour into this mine every year, I’d guess no more than a season or two... As such, I’m very glad we got the chance to visit as we may well be the last visitors to this mine. Ever. And this is very likely the only video footage that exists of this mine. I find that to be somewhat sad, but the mountains and deserts are absolutely filled with historic mines like this that have been lost forever. I’ve seen mind-blowing old photographs from the inside of mines not far from the one seen in this video. Perhaps they are still impressive underground, but they are no longer accessible and, on the surface, there is little trace of them and the men that struggled, sweated and bled there. At least we were able to get into this mine in its final days to capture what will soon be gone. So, what was the deal with the ore chute? Ore chutes are supposed to be free of obstructions with sides as smooth as possible to facilitate the ore easily sliding down them to the waiting ore carts below. The large ore chute in this mine seemed to break those rules. The sides were not smooth and those boards laid across the supports would get in the way of ore or waste rock being dropped down (if the impact didn’t break the boards). Given the quality of the woodwork, I do not have the impression that the miners didn’t know what they were doing. So, I really don’t know what was going on there. Any ideas? I’m also a bit puzzled by the function of that fantastic wood-lined raise. I understand the purpose of the wood in preventing rock from sloughing off the sides and it looked really cool to have all sides of the square covered. However, what was the real purpose of that structure in the first place? So, the miners could access an upper level? Well, obviously, but what did they do when they got up there? There was no ore chute to drop ore down. So, what were they doing up there and why was such a large opening necessary if it was just providing access to the miners? If it connects to the workings accessed by the ore chute, what is the need for the raise since the miners could have just climbed up the manway next to the ore chute to access those workings? I hate unanswered questions like these as we will likely never know the answer. This is the first time that I have explored an abandoned mine in this part of the Sierra Nevada. The region was off of my radar, but after a very precise tip from a viewer, I saw quite quickly that overlooking this area had been a mistake. Having already picked a lot of the low-hanging fruit around us, tips from viewers are becoming increasingly important (hint hint). We don’t have the money or time to run off to Nevada, Alaska, Italy, Germany, Indonesia, Slovenia, etc. every week for a new video. So, we need that local knowledge to help steer us toward some good mines to explore! ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 12007 TVR Exploring
Caterpillar 6060 Face Shovel loading Autonomous Trucks
 
13:44
The Caterpillar 6060FS is a 600 tonne class face shovel. It can be seen here loading autonomous 793 haul trucks using Cat's Minestar system. More details to follow on the revolution of automation in the mining industry.
Views: 1017756 Awesome Earthmovers
Death Valley Curly & The 1885 Mine
 
14:53
The mining district where this mine is located was famed for its rich silver production... I would love to tell you more about the history of this mine than that. However, with these early mines (subsequent research leads me to believe that the 1885 carved into the wooden door may well be accurate), there were often few – if any - written records. That is particularly the case with a smaller mine such as this one where I was unable to even determine a name, let alone production records or the identities of the original miners that worked there. I don’t know if “Death Valley Curly” ever mined here or not, but I’d love to know more of his story as well. I am curious to know how the miners decided on the location of this mine. The surface of this site was made up of broken rocks from an ancient lava flow and there didn’t appear to be any minerals that would have caught the eyes of the miners. I suppose they might have had a hunch that the lava flow had covered up a good deposit of silver ore, but why here? Perhaps one of the geologists in the audience will correct me, but a lava flow of this type seems like really unpromising ground to run a mine into. The smaller size of the mine might be confirmation of that speculation on my part. Despite starting out with relatively drab colors, the adit really exploded with color around the end of the haulage adit where that significant winze was. I’m partially colorblind, but that really popped even for me. So, I can only imagine how it looks for those of you enjoying the ability to fully see color. I believe that that would have been an interesting place to try out a blacklight. I am not sure what inspired the miners to run that ridiculously deep winze straight down toward the end of the haulage adit. Perhaps they were giving up on continuing to drive ahead horizontally as they had been? Or perhaps they found some promising indicators as they were working down? The other work branching off from the haulage adit seemed exploratory in nature or perhaps the miners had come across a small pocket or two along the way, but nothing significant. Regardless of the reason for its creation, I remain very curious about how deep that winze runs and if there are any additional levels down there. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 116463 TVR Exploring
Fascinating Visit To The “Rogue” Miner’s Gold Mine
 
31:22
We were very fortunate to be afforded the opportunity to visit this historic site as it is certainly not open to the public... Aside from the colorful personality of Mr. Randy Yager, we were also treated to an extensive tour of a rich - and still producing - lode gold mine (And not a dull visit of the “stay behind the white lines” variety that would be found on the tourist circuit either). As viewers of this channel know, it is rare for us to encounter very much in the way of historical mining equipment and artifacts at an abandoned mine. Many abandoned mines have had much of their equipment and other treasures carted away by the miners themselves when the mine was abandoned. Over the following decades, “collectors” carry away pretty much everything else that can be lifted and hauled away… Not at this mine though! At this mine, we get to see what a functioning gold mine looks like – one that was a medium-sized, mine-to-mill operation several decades ago and that now might as well be a living museum from that era. The shower room/work shop/drill room/bunkhouse/compressor room and the mill could use a little paint and some duct tape before they would be in pristine condition again, but we can still see all of the equipment in them as it was when this mine was in full operation and see exactly how things worked back then. I love the underground time, but I found that “moment frozen in time” experience on the surface to be fascinating. You’ve got to think that they were still actively mining here up into the 1960s when gold was $35 an ounce and the miners were able to support themselves on that. So, consider the potential of this mine now if it were to be brought back up to maximum production! With the background noise and different people talking, it can be hard to hear him sometimes, but if you listen carefully, Randy provides a lot of information about this mine. I tried to include as much of him discussing the mine as I could, but I had almost two hours of video that needed to be whittled down to make it digestible for the short attention span of many (but certainly not all) YouTube viewers. It was interesting (to me at least) to hear that the miners had simply tunneled past badly caved sections in the mine rather than deal with the hassle of trying to rehab these sketchy sections. I wasn’t clear if the 3,000+ feet that the adit ran past the waste rock pile where Cory and I climbed up the raise was just caved in one section or if essentially all of it was caved. I believe it was one section, but I’m not certain of that. As you may have heard, aside from the thousands of feet that the main haulage adit kept running, there were also four levels above us in the haulage adit and several levels below us. So, this is a pretty extensive mine. I’d imagine there could be some pretty good stuff to see in these other sections. It would have been wonderful to spend a whole day here, but when you’re someone’s guest, you move at their pace. Thank you again, Cory and Randy, for this adventure. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 18921 TVR Exploring
Great Finds At A Gold Mine In The Sierras - Part 2
 
23:40
Coincidentally, the adits we discovered during this full day of exploring were progressively older. So, they make for an interesting walk back in time that happens to be in chronological order. The adit we explored in the first video was last worked in the 1960s or 1970s, while the adit seen in this video was likely last worked around the 1930s. I say “likely” because with many of these older mines, it is difficult – and often impossible – to find detailed records. Often, there are no records at all to be found in the public domain. As you undoubtedly observed, the adit I explored in this video was not the most pleasant one and, as such, I imagine you will not be shocked to learn that it did not make it onto my “Favorite Abandoned Mines” list. This one really ticked a lot of the “unpleasant” boxes. Bad air? Check. Deep, sucking mud? Check. Unstable rock overhead? Check. Difficult to access? Check. That orange, sucking mud is something that I associate with underground placer mines as that is the only place I have seen it. Many viewers have compared it to orange mud that B.C. Frank encountered in Anyox. However, there are some significant differences. Perhaps the most significant is that this “mine mud” is very dense. It will not wash away unless it is subjected to intense pressure. Furthermore, it develops a hard crust on the surface – almost like a rust. One can almost, but not quite, walk on this crust. Instead, one has to push through it like an icebreaker, which is quite a lot of work when one is also fighting through the sucking mud underneath. Some underground placer mines are so choked with this mud that it is not possible to proceed beyond a wall of mud that has formed. To confuse matters more, however, some underground placer mines don’t have this mud at all. This “mine mud” flows down from the underground placer deposits (ancient river channels), but it is not clear to me why some sections of the ancient river channels produce this awful mud in mines and other sections do not produce it at all. I am talking about mines that are very close to each other too, not in different mining districts. Contrary to how it might look in the video, I was not using a candle to illuminate the haulage adit. Instead, I was using two bright (1000+ lumens each) lights with fresh batteries. That dark rock just swallows up the light to an incredible degree. Fortunately, the adits that Mr. McBride located across the creek while I was slopping around in the mud with this adit – which will be seen in the third (and final) video in this series - more than make up for the setbacks at these first two adits. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 14581 TVR Exploring
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada - Part 1
 
16:18
Probably less than a dozen people know about the historic miner’s cabin hidden away on this mining claim - and even fewer still know about the abundance of gold mines found here… It remains a secret because the people that do know where this is remain tight-lipped about it and this cabin and mines are located in an absolute black hole on topographic and other maps. There is simply nothing marked anywhere near here. With the contractors for the Forest Service, BLM, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) programs, et al working overtime (with taxpayer money) to get all of these historic mines erased, it is very nice to be introduced to some gold mines that are not (currently) in danger of being permanently closed. It is a shame that we have to wallow in such secrecy simply to protect a historically significant site from the very entities that should be preserving it, but such is the upside down world we live in. The two adits featured in this video appear to be quite old. I was able to find a couple of references to the mines consolidated on this claim in mining journals dating back to the turn of the last century and they were described as already having been worked for a while at that time. So, initial work here probably dates back to around the time of California’s “Gold Rush” era. The earliest gold miners in California were placer miners. However, when the easy pickings from the surface were worked out, they became lode miners and headed underground to start chasing the veins where the gold in the creeks originated from (some underground miners also chased the rich placer left behind by ancient river channels that were buried millions of years ago). The little hole by the creek under the huge boulder would have been referred to as a “coyote hole” by the miners of the time. These were in abundance along the creeks and rivers of California in the early days as the miners pursued gold flakes and nuggets back into the rocks and gravel lining the waterways. So, it seems likely that the small adit we visited first would have been the one developed initially and then the larger adit punching into the hard rock would have come along later. In further support of the idea that these mines are older rather than newer is that, although it may possibly have been there at one point, there was no sign of rail at the mines we visited. The claim owner also stated that he has never seen any sign of rail here either. It is not difficult to imagine a swarm of miners crawling all over these canyon walls like ants during the “Gold Rush” era, churning up the creeks and digging out coyote holes. This initial surge of miners, however, would have been followed by a more patient, more sophisticated group of miners that had an eye on heading underground. At the second adit shown in this video, for example, you could have had something like a father and son team or two brothers slowly working away at that lode mine for years, chasing those quartz veins and hauling load after load of ore and waste rock out in wheelbarrows. I’m giving more of a general feel for the area with these videos rather than showing every single bit of mining history present as both sides of this canyon are covered in mines and the remains of mining equipment. We’ll see more of that in the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines that I have explored: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 98763 TVR Exploring
Pioneering Underground Mining
 
08:48
Joy Mining Machinery releases a new version of its most popular video "Pioneering Underground Mining". You can request a free copy of this video by contacting [email protected] and provide your name and mailing address and if you want the copy in DVD or Blu-ray format. It was first produced in 2001 to support a request by our US Midwest sales region to help a customer explain the difference between room and pillar and longwall mining to finance people. It quickly became the most widely distributed video in our library being used by universities, schools, shown to community groups, etc. The program was updated to show new products and includes all new HD video and animations.
Views: 831254 JoyMiningMachinery
Fantastically Preserved Old Mine Out In The Desert
 
26:11
It is a rare treat to come across an abandoned mine that is preserved as well as this one. Taking the age of this mine into account, having the mining equipment still in working order, having all of those tools still around, still being able to read the paperwork left inside the mine – that’s pretty extraordinary stuff when compared to most abandoned mines (and we’ve been to quite a lot of them now). We primarily have the dry desert conditions to thank for the mine being in this state as well as the fact that it is exceedingly difficult to get to it (However, I also think that not many people know about this particular abandoned mine). There are no roads to this mine – only the remains of a mule trail, which is now very faint. So, think about the fact that EVERYTHING you see at this site was hauled in on foot by men or mules. That’s impressive considering the amount of rail and some of the heavy equipment at this mining operation. I love sites like this because they give such a great insight into how the miners lived in the past. Based on the artifacts at this site, for example, we know what the miners read, what they ate, where they washed their hands, where they slept at night, etc. It is not difficult at all to imagine what day-to-day life was like for the crew of miners that worked here. A few questions I had… I would be very curious to know what the other building next to the intact miner’s cabin that we explored was (the building that had tumbled down the wash). We found artifacts quite a way down that wash, but nothing that gave us an insight into what that particular building was. Given the other bedframe present at the site, it might have just been another place to sleep. Hard to imagine miners sharing a bed and there was just one bed in the cabin we explored! Also, I would be curious to know where the stamp mill was and how large it was. It seems that a fair amount of it may have been buried from the waste rock pile shifting. Lastly, I would love to know more about that caved adit across from the miner’s cabin. Was that the original adit at this site? How far back did it go? As I said at the introduction to this video, credit for locating this mine goes to my exploring buddy, Adit Addicts, whose YouTube channel can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIXOU8aR7o50X6q2wQ0wbCQ All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 42522 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Many Adits Of Nevada's Sweetwater Rim Mine
 
24:21
We stumbled across this abandoned mine while looking for a camping spot, just as darkness was descending upon us (I shot the video the next morning). So, it was a most welcome discovery since it was an ideal location - level ground, out of the wind, a cleared area, good views, plenty of dry wood around for firewood… Abandoned mines often make for great campsites and this one was not an exception. This name of this mine does not appear on any topographic maps that we have seen (if it is even marked at all) and it took some serious digging to even come up with a name. So, regrettably, I am unable to share any concrete information on its history. This area is heavy on lead and silver mines though and so, it stands to reason, they likely mined the same here as well. It would seem that the area where we camped might possibly be the older workings at the mine given the absence of rail and the remains of that very old stone building in the wash (which is presumably where the early miner – or miners – lived). Perhaps the miner(s) followed the veins around the hill and started working that second section after coming to believe the first area we explored was played out. In support of this possibility is the fact that the second section had rail, more equipment, an ore chute, etc. Of course, another possibility is that the stone building was from the very early days of Nevada’s mining history and that some modest mining was done then, but that the majority of the mining work seen in the first and second sections dates to an effort during the 1930s or so. I mention this second possibility because the woodwork inside of both the first and second sections appears to be about the same age and it seems less likely that miners would be living in a primitive stone shelter by the 1930s. That woodwork could also simply be a result of more recent claim owners (of which there is obviously at least one) going back and poking around in old workings. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 17057 TVR Exploring
Underground Forest Of Timbers In Abandoned Mine – Part 1
 
19:29
This abandoned copper mine is one we wanted to visit because we have seen explorers visit the main adit (including Adit Addicts, my exploring buddy for the day), but had never seen that anyone had documented the numerous upper adits of this particular mine. The main section of the mine is quite impressive and it is certainly understandable why explorers focus on it (I cover the ground level as well so that you can have a sense of it too in case this is your first time seeing this mine). In the interest of completeness though, we wanted to cover all that there was to see here. Also, the overlooked abandoned mines or even the overlooked sections of abandoned mines often yield the best historical treasures. I’ll discuss the guts of this mine in more detail when I get to the main section in the next video, but, as I mentioned above, this was a copper mine and, from what we could tell, all of the production took place around the turn of the last century (the 1900s). Apparently, the mine was only active for several years, but they certainly made the most of that time. Although I just explore the ground level in the main section of the mine (in the next video), I will link to other explorers that have visited all of the levels in the main mine so that you can see what it looks like. Teamwork between mine explorers will get all of these old mines explored and documented! The YouTube channel for Adit Addicts can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIXOU8aR7o50X6q2wQ0wbCQ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 35874 TVR Exploring
Hitachi EX5500 Excavator Loading CAT 789 Dump Truck Open Pit Mining
 
07:29
Exclusive Video From Mr. Tarno TC WARNING!!! NO TV BROADCAST WITHOUT PERMISSION!!! NO RE-UPLOAD!!! MrZygy3
Views: 179799 MrZygy3
Exploring The Yuba River Mines: Part 2
 
20:11
The road forks at the “Pit of Gold” mine seen in the first video with the fork to the left running uphill and then upriver (we’ll see that section in the next video) and the fork to the right running along the river until it abruptly ends where a bridge was washed out long ago. In this video, we take the fork to the right, but the road is so rough that we are compelled to walk in this section. Along the way, we encounter the remains of vehicles that could not handle the road. However, also along the way, we encounter multiple shafts and adits - evidence of this area’s rich gold and rich mining history. At the end of the road, we cross the Yuba River to visit a mine that George Hearst once held an interest in. George Hearst was the father of William Randolph Hearst (perhaps most famous for his media empire and for Hearst Castle). William Randolph Hearst got his start with money from his father’s very profitable mining investments. So, it is pretty safe to say that this Yuba Mine was a successful one. The miners must have been following a tremendous vein of quartz as you’ll see in the video that the adits are stacked one on top of the other and that they followed the vein all of the way to the surface, creating open stopes. It’s an impressive sight… With these open stopes and all of the adits running in horizontally, I believe that the miners created a series of false floors or trestles inside of the mountain and worked there way up or down until they had taken as much quartz out as they could. The natural limit, of course, being them hitting the open sky… The miners would have brought the ore out on carts and then either sent it down an ore chute or down a tramway to the bottom of the canyon. At the bottom was a 25-stamp mill (one doesn’t build a mill of that size unless they are into something good) as well as a hydroelectric facility to power the mill. The records I saw indicated that the miners pushed more than 600 feet into the mountain. Therefore, we are only seeing a small part of this operation as, unfortunately, so much material has come down those open stopes that it blocks us from continuing for the full length of the adits. When I go into the bottom adit, I encounter a pile of rubble where the open stope starts. In the upper right corner, you can see a tiny opening where the adit continues. The opening is almost completely covered with rocks, but cold air was screaming out of there. So, I know that adit continued back quite a way. Of course, that also means that it is at least partially unobstructed. So, if someone were really motivated… By the way, that gold vein has been there for much longer than the canyon has. So, a large section of that vein was eroded away and washed down into the river (becoming placer gold). The giant pit we saw in the first video is just downstream from this mine and so a fair amount of the gold could have washed down into that pit. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 18923 TVR Exploring
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 1
 
16:19
This is the first abandoned limestone mine I ever explored and it is a big one… As an essential ingredient in concrete, this mine was brought into existence together with a nearby concrete producer in 1910. Underground mining continued into the early 1960’s before the focus shifted to the open pit mining of limestone nearby. Although significantly remodeled over the years, the concrete production plant remains open. My exploring buddy for this day is Alessio (who introduced me to this site) and his exploring channel can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA As it is sedimentary, limestone is made up of the skeletal remains of countless living creatures such as coral and foraminifera. I suppose it is somewhat morbid to consider that when walking on a concrete sidewalk, for example, that we are tromping on the corpses of millions of living creatures. Taking it a step further, consider that limestone is a common ingredient in toothpaste as well! It’s labeled as calcium carbonate should you choose to examine your toothpaste. This mine is located in the region of Tuscany, which is more commonly associated with fine wine and historic cities such as Florence and Siena. However, I assure you that it has a very fine selection of abandoned mines as well. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6410 TVR Exploring
A Deep Mine In The Nevada Desert – Part 2 of 2
 
21:56
This abandoned mine has some of the best miner’s graffiti I have ever come across in our many mine explores... Although we see the aftermath of the miner’s work in these videos and often see the equipment they mined with, it isn’t often that we get an insight into the personalities and personal lives of the miners. However, this graffiti allows us to connect with them across time and distance. Many, if not all, of them are likely no longer in the land of the living. So, this allows us to see and to feel what once was… As you can see from the range of dates, mining took place here for a while. How about those very fully loaded ore chutes at the far end of the main adit? I could almost feel the pressure inside the adit of those tons of rocks straining the wood to its limits. It really seemed like those ore chutes could pop at almost any time. And, as you saw, my forward progress was blocked by the rubble that spilled into the adit from one of the chutes that failed. It made me wonder how much farther the drift continued past that collapsed ore chute? Did it perhaps connect to that deep cut we saw in the first video? The portal I examined at the end of the video (when I got back outside and climbed up to the top of the hill) appears to date from the same time as the first part of the mine we explored (the deep cut in the first video) or the incline my exploring buddy located near the remains of those stone buildings (also in the first video in this series). ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 28970 TVR Exploring
The Kensington Mine: Happy To See A Collapse?
 
16:56
This large, ambitious adit was driven more than 6,000 feet into the hills you saw in the introduction to the video in search of rich silver ore. Those hills, by the way, are absolutely covered in Nevada mining history from the 1800s. Foundations, collapsed adits and shafts, gated shafts, small open adits, crumbling stone buildings, can dumps… There are essentially limitless exploration possibilities here for those interested in history and ghost towns. I have not been able to verify this information, but I have read that the adit we explored in this video was started in the 1870s and that a tram ran down the mountain to the mill seen in the introduction. The most striking moment in exploring this abandoned mine for us was when we reached the collapsed section of the adit and first heard the roaring sound described in the video. It was a huge volume of water! From our perspective inside of the adit, it sounded like the Niagara Falls was cascading down behind the, apparently, thin caved section between us and the torrent of water. As I explained in the video, we know that there were several crosscuts driven from this adit underneath other mines. Some of these crosscuts had raises pushed up to connect with the lower workings of these other mines. As such, the adit we explored is now acting as a massive drain tunnel for multiple mines. So, it is no wonder that we heard so much water roaring down back there! I have never heard of a situation like this before involving multiple mines and have certainly never heard this volume of water in a mine before. I would be very curious to see how it looks behind the caved section and to learn where all of this water flows. Anyone want to volunteer to find a way in? Oh, and here is the link to the YouTube channel for Mines of the West: https://www.youtube.com/user/GramVideos95 ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 25230 TVR Exploring
Nevada's Abandoned Hughes Mine
 
09:32
Mines – abandoned or otherwise – almost always seem to present surprises for explorers… This lead and silver mine in the Nevada has a series of shafts running along the upper edge of the property. Some of these shafts are quite large and deep. So, when I came across an extremely large, modern adit leading toward this cluster of shafts, I assumed this was a haulage adit of sorts that tied into the shafts. I was mistaken. And, as my opening sentence implied, I was surprised by the reality of the large adit. This mine appears to have been worked over at least several decades. The mill building and headframe have been completely demolished and some of the shafts have decayed quite considerably. However, that adit was probably no older than the 1980s and the main shaft was in fairly decent shape and probably dates to around the time the adit was constructed. I am uncertain as to the age of the ore bin and I do not have enough experience with them to offer an intelligent guess. The ore bin ended up being probably my favorite thing about this mine site… Although, I was also taken by the number of jackrabbits (they are actually hares) and by the number of barrels of cyanide in the dry wash. I really wanted to provide some drone footage so we could see an overview of the site, but the controller just would not connect to the drone that day. Very frustrating. As I often say, technology is great when it works. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 12036 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Abandoned Calhoun Mine - Part 1 of 2
 
22:17
I was completely overwhelmed by this mine. I mean, there is absolutely no way to tell from the outside just how significant of an operation this was. There was no visible mining infrastructure outside except for a few boards and the remains of a car from the 1930s. And, perhaps the most reliable indicator, which is a large waste rock pile, was completely misleading as the waste rock pile only consisted of that small landing where I filmed the portal from. I don’t know what they did with all of the waste rock… So, I went inside thinking that this would be a fairly modest mine. And, to be fair, the main haulage adit was of about an average size. However, all of the ore passages and suggestions of extensive upper levels still didn’t prepare me for the scale of what was above me. After ascending the metal ladder near the portal, I discovered there was a massive labyrinth of chambers and drifts spanning multiple levels above the main haulage adit. As I worked my way through chamber after breasted out chamber, I just could not believe how much was up there. In fact, for the first time ever, I was not able to finish a mine exploration. Yes, it was THAT big. The batteries on everything but my flashlight died and even my flashlight battery was starting to fade, so I had to wrap it up without being able to fully explore this abandoned mine as I like to do (since I hate the feeling of unfinished business). I was in this mine for hours and I walked around inside so much, that I gave myself severe blisters from the waders (which are not intended for distance walking). I really had no idea what I was getting into with this mine and it is definitely one of the most surprising mines I have ever been inside… The earliest written records of this abandoned mine that I could find were newspaper articles dating back to 1908. However, the articles also mention that the mine used to be known by another name and dates back even earlier. So, we know that the mine is well over a century old. We’re just not sure of exactly how old or what its origins are. The most extensive work appears to have been done during the 1920s and 1930s when thousands of feet of drifts were driven in (and apparently this is when the labyrinth was more fully developed). ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 14178 TVR Exploring
Underground Forest Of Timbers In Abandoned Mine – Part 2
 
15:18
As I mentioned in the first video, the primary focus on our visit to this abandoned copper mine was to explore the, apparently, undocumented upper adits. They were both interesting and impressive and I am glad that I visited them (although I regret not taking a closer look at one of them that I thought was impossible to enter, but WAS actually possible as I found out later). However, I was unable to resist taking a quick look inside the main section of this mine… That would be the 250 level and is the focus of this video. I initially just went in to the 250 level for a bit in order to rush on to the upper adits before it got dark. However, when we came to accept that, no matter what, we were going to be riding our motorcycles back in the dark without headlights, the time pressure was lifted from us and we returned to the 250 level in the main section of the mine for a closer look. According to the records we located, this mine was worked on at least 6-7 levels and had in excess of two miles of underground workings. Yes, two miles of underground workings is not a typo. The miners pursued the copper ore quite aggressively through multiple adits, a deep shaft, open stopes and even surface work. Despite the extensive amount of work – and quite professional work – it appears that almost all of the work at this mine was conducted for just a decade or so after 1916. In that time, the miners reportedly extracted more than one million dollars worth of copper (and don’t forget, those are 1920s dollars). If you are curious as to what the entire mine looks like, I would heartily suggest following the links below… Although there is overlap, each of us also focused on different parts of the mine. So, putting all of the videos together provides a VERY complete picture of this mine: Mines of the West does a thorough, level-by-level series on this mine: Part 1: https://youtu.be/jFGAxzJyk5g Part 2: https://youtu.be/y_2kgq9dx4s Part 3: https://youtu.be/RKxMV8G1ZcM Jake covers the inside, of course, and does a good job of it, but also covers the hill above the main part of the mine that none of the rest of us covered at all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8-jMpJin6E Mr. McBride, both informative and entertaining, does a broad overview of the highlights of this abandoned mine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYfsiEjgZpU If I missed anyone, please let me know, so that I can update this section… Again, teamwork will get all of these mines explored and documented! ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 27516 TVR Exploring
Exploring More Of A Huge Abandoned Mill And Mine
 
32:33
It took me the better part of a day to explore this abandoned mine and I didn’t even cover the whole site. If you look at a satellite view of this mine (the coordinates are in the description in the first video), you can see that there are workings over the hill behind the mill (rhyming unintentional) that I did not visit. I have no reason to believe that this part of the mine would be dramatically different than that which we have already seen, but still, it speaks to the massive size of the Santa Lucia Mine. Of course, those workings over the hill are more remote and the more remote a mine is, the better the discoveries to be made there in our experience. So, who knows what might be back there? I hope that what I was trying to explain with the layout of the adits when I was underground made sense. Essentially, what I was saying is that with the older workings the miners burrowed their way through the mountain and, I would imagine, extracted a fair amount of ore via the room and pillar method or through enormous stopes. As technology advanced and open pit (also called open cast) mining became more economical, the miners just hammered straight through the mountain and removed a significant part of it. In doing so, they rammed right through the older workings, causing these drifts to cave in and to be filled with rubble. Regrettably, the two adits we found that led to workings that had not been smashed through by the open pit were both totally inaccessible (the one in the first video was flooded to the top and the one in this video was caved right at the portal). Given the number of muckers as well as the trammer, ore carts and other mining equipment, I would imagine those workings were pretty extensive and it would be interesting to see how this deposit of ore was mined (as well as, of course, to see what sort of artifacts the miners might have left behind). I also hope that the way the mill functioned makes more sense now after having had a chance to see the second video with the first half of the mill. I unknowingly explored the mill backwards when I visited as I visited the second half of the ore processing facility in the first video and the first half of the mill in the second video. That even sounds confusing to me and I am the one that wrote it. So, hopefully, all of you followed that. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21382 TVR Exploring
PROSPECTING FOR PLACER GOLD   1849 CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH DOCUMENTARY 64444
 
09:30
Made by Arthur Barr, this short film shows some of the technologies used by prospectors to find gold in the 1849 California Gold Rush. At 2:00, a prospector shows how a pan is used to sift river sand in search of gold flakes. At 2;24 a claim is staked out with a claim post. At 3:30 a rocker or cradle is made to sift gravel. At 3:53, wooden bars called riffers and a hopper to hold the sand and gravel are created from wood. At 4:40 the operation of the hopper is shown. At 6:17 a Long Tom sluice is shown, which used the power of the river to separate the sand and gold from the gravel, with gold trapped behind the riffle bars. At 8:00 gold flecks are recovered from the Long Tom via a pan. At 8:30, a series of riffle boxes are placed together to form a sluice box -- the best of all placer mining tools. Placer mining is the mining of stream bed (alluvial) deposits for minerals. This may be done by open-pit (also called open-cast mining) or by various surface excavating equipment or tunnelling equipment. Placer mining is frequently used for precious metal deposits (particularly gold) and gemstones, both of which are often found in alluvial deposits—deposits of sand and gravel in modern or ancient stream beds, or occasionally glacial deposits. The metal or gemstones, having been moved by stream flow from an original source such as a vein, are typically only a minuscule portion of the total deposit. Since gems and heavy metals like gold are considerably more dense than sand, they tend to accumulate at the base of placer deposits. It is important to note that placer deposits can be as young as a few years old, such as the Canadian Queen Charlotte beach gold placer deposits, or billions of years old like the Elliott Lake uranium paleoplacer within the Huronian Supergroup in Canada. The containing material in an alluvial placer mine may be too loose to safely mine by tunnelling, though it is possible where the ground is permanently frozen. Where water under pressure is available, it may be used to mine, move, and separate the precious material from the deposit, a method known as hydraulic mining, hydraulic sluicing or hydraulicking. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1446 PeriscopeFilm
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 3 – Into The (Sketchy) Upper Adit
 
20:37
On the hike back to my rental car to retrieve the waders, I unintentionally interrupted a young Italian couple having sex in their Mercedes. They had driven up and parked next to the abandoned mine buildings seen in the first video because, obviously, who would care about some abandoned mine? What better place to be alone? The look of horror on the girl’s face as I emerged from the brush, covered in mud and mine exploring gear, was priceless. One would think they’d have seen my car on the way in, but I suppose they had other things on their minds. I guess I wasn’t the only one receiving surprises at this mine on that day... After being surprised by all of the equipment on the surface and the discovery of the lower adit, I wasn’t sure what to expect with this upper adit that I had initially bypassed. As you’ll see in the video, it ended up being rather sketchy. Other abandoned iron mines that I have been inside were extremely solid. So, I did not expect the conditions inside of the Monte Arsiccio Mine to be as sporty as they were. The older workings were particularly bad. So, I can understand why they were barricaded off… The amount of material that had come down (ground fall) in the older workings made it difficult to learn much about them since the drifts were either caved or artifacts were buried underneath tons of rock that I was just able to scramble over the top of (which is never a good feeling because one is walking on what used to be the top of the adit). For example, what was that unusual “room” that was in the shape of a hexagon? So much rock had fallen down that it was impossible to determine what was in there or what might have been in there. I thought it was interesting how the older and newer workings are literally layered right on top of each other inside of this mine and how much they run together. At times, it is difficult to tell where the old workings end and the new workings begin. Typically, in a mine with newer and older workings, the new and the old are very distinct and separate. I thought it was even more interesting to see how thin the layer of rock that the miners had been driving the LHD on was! That layer of rock between the level I was shooting from and the cavity created by the older workings below was perhaps a foot thick. Really, I am surprised that section where the large pit now is did not collapse when the fully loaded LHD was rumbling over the top of it. I guess the Italians did a good job managing the laws of physics on that one… They certainly made the most of extracting the ore they were after since the older workings below run RIGHT up to the newer workings. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13899 TVR Exploring
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 5: Breaking Out To The Sunset (Final)
 
13:50
It was a pleasant surprise to discover all of those openings to the outside world at the top of the mine. Running across multiple open adits as we experienced at this mine is far less likely to happen in our Sierra Nevadas where most abandoned mines are eroded shut. However, one is more likely to have the abandoned mine gods smile upon them in Nevada where there are abundant mines and dry conditions. The lack of vegetation makes the mines much easier to spot and the lack of water makes the mines far less likely to be eroded shut. In the mountains, the biggest threat to abandoned mines is the water that causes them to cave and erode shut. Closely behind water, the Forest Service is the next biggest threat to abandoned mines in the mountains. In the desert, the biggest danger for historical abandoned mines is definitely the BLM, Forest Service, et al that are aggressively and purposefully destroying this part of our heritage for self-serving reasons. The second biggest threat to abandoned mines in the desert is probably geology itself. Adits and shafts that run through unstable ground invariably cave regardless of the presence of water or not. Of course, we have unstable ground in the mountains as well. This is often found inside of the underground placer mines since the sand and gravel in the ancient river channels does not support itself well once a cavity (in the form of an adit, stope or shaft) has been created. Those of you that have been with us for a while have seen plenty of examples of this (the Ruby Mine being perhaps the most memorable). I’m not sure how the miners accessed those upper portals or workings as I find it unlikely that they scrambled up the stopes as I did. However, those portals to the outside also seem unlikely as they were situated in an awkward position for access relative to the other workings and surface buildings we encountered. So, perhaps these were older workings? It is difficult to say. This series is now complete... I hope you enjoyed watching it as much as I enjoyed exploring and documenting it. As I said previously, this is the best abandoned mine I have ever explored. I would love to come across an abandoned mine that tops this one, but we have visited hundreds of abandoned mines now and this remains the best (so far). ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 10807 TVR Exploring
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 3
 
19:52
I’m not exaggerating when I say that this section of the abandoned limestone mine has the biggest adits (mine tunnels) that I have ever seen – and we have seen a lot of underground mines… It seems apparent that the miners were intent on extracting as much limestone as possible, while maintaining the minimum of what was necessary for the structural integrity of the mine. As such, we encountered adit after adit, all in rows with interconnecting tunnels. These rows of adits extend to the levels above and below too, leaving just a skeleton of stone behind to prop everything up. It really is an extraordinary site. Bear in mind, we only scratched the surface of all that makes up this mine. There are many levels we did not access and many drifts we did not go into. Given the sheer scale of the workings in this section of the mine, we assumed that these workings must be newer than the first underground workings we explored. Some have expressed surprise that the miners did not simply pursue an open pit operation at this limestone deposit. In fact, the remainder of this deposit is being quarried nearby. However, the miners were not stupid and the concrete plant is still in business. So, give them the benefit of the doubt in regard to pursuing the limestone deposit underground in this section. Given how low labor costs used to be and given that earthmoving equipment can handle a lot more now than it could more than a century ago when they started this mine, it was probably more economical for the miners to punch in from the side and to haul the limestone straight out rather than to dig down from the top in order to haul it up and out to be turned into concrete. Again, a big thank you to Alessio for sharing this mine with us... His channel can be found below and he does urban exploration in general, not just abandoned mines! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6340 TVR Exploring
A Most Unexpected Gold Mine In The High Sierra
 
23:43
This is actually not our first visit to this abandoned gold mine, but this is our first visit to THIS part of the mine. We couldn’t shake the feeling that we had missed something on our first exploring visit… So, after a couple of years, we returned to this abandoned mine high up in the mountains to take a second look at it. We found more surface workings where the miners had carved out trenches surrounding quartz veins and we observed that some of the surface workings we had seen before were looking much more eroded and precarious despite the relatively short passage of time (abandoned mines tend to have a short shelf life). Of much more significance though, while assessing what we thought was a simple ore pass to a caved adit below, we discovered something quite unexpected, which is the subject of this video… There was some confusion on our part as to whether what we found was a simple ore pass or a shaft. So, you’ll hear us refer to it as both. It was open to the surface and dropped down through various drift levels like a shaft. However, they also dumped ore down from surface workings at the top – like an ore pass - in order for it to be processed in the mill below. Sometimes these things are difficult to classify. So, what do you think it should be called? I apologize for the footage that is less stable than that to which you are accustomed, but you’ll recall the formula I have shared before: The more remote and harder a mine is to reach, the less gear I will be taking with me. I didn’t even have extra camera batteries for this one. Just my helmet, my handheld flashlight, gloves and my camera. That’s it. Yes, this is a remote mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 47345 TVR Exploring
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 2
 
18:26
After exploring what was possible to explore (or that we were willing to explore) off to the left side of the main hub of this gigantic mine, we made our way back over to explore the right side. This meant heading down the large passage taking off from the underground workshop… The number of drifts and inclines fanning out in all directions was staggering and we had to stay focused in order to maintain some order in our exploring. Fortunately, we were able to get into areas of open stoping (with natural support) on this side of the mine and to see some of the minerals the miners were seeking. Additionally, on several occasions, we were able to look up to (or down to) different levels in this mine, suggesting that the underground workings were even greater than we had already imagined. Interestingly, this side of the abandoned mine was in far better shape than the other side and we encountered hardly any water. I should mention that with this mine I have edited many, many hours of exploring down to a manageable clip that shows the noteworthy features, but spares my dear viewers the tedious viewing of us walking, walking, walking and walking some more (and then walking some more) down miles of featureless drifts. The primary mineral extracted at this mine was zinc, but copper, lead, silver and even molybdenum, among other minerals, were recovered as well. Headframe Hunters, who was kind enough to do some research on this mine for us, had the following to share on the geology of the mine: “It was a mid-grade zinc mine - the primary zinc ore type mined is sphalerite (zinc sulfide, commonly called jack), which explains the acid mine drainage and hydrogen sulfide you encountered. The deposit is probably an igneous-hosted hydrothermal vein-type deposit; a limestone-hosted MVT like we have in Missouri would have buffered out all the acid.” Ultimately, this mine closed due to a period of low zinc prices rather than because the mine was played out. There are actually a significant quantity of valuable minerals still underground at this abandoned mine. * Thank you to Headframe Hunters and Mines of the West for the information they were able to dredge up on this abandoned mine * ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 41628 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 4
 
22:50
Well, here it is… I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and I’ve seen some amazing things, but nothing has been as awesome for me as stepping into the bottom of that gigantic natural cavern. I will never forget that. I can only imagine what the miners thought when they first punched in to the cave and tried to gain an understanding of how huge it was with only the benefit of candles or carbide lamps. Interestingly, the reports I read on this mine indicated that the floor of this cavern was covered in staggeringly rich oxidized ore. So, the natural processes that formed the cave (presumably water passing through the mountain?) left behind a rich reward for the pioneering miners that discovered the cave. The geological features inside the cavern lead me to believe that there was a fair amount of water that flowed through despite this mine being in the desert. Pretty interesting geology, no? In a way, it is a shame that the miners were not more concerned with aesthetics because it would have been nice to see how massive the cavern was originally. However, sentimentality aside, the miners must have been delighted to fill that cavern up with waste rock rather than having to haul it all of the way outside. Everything that we were climbing around on in there was all waste rock. Does anyone disagree with me or have another idea about that unusual two-toned pile I climbed up? Given how finely ground it was, it sure looked like tailings. The miners dropped tons and tons of waste rock into the huge cavern, why not tailings from the surface as well? Even with the benefit of time, I still don’t have a better idea on that one. It's a good thing that air flowing out reminded us of that last “little” drift we hadn’t explored, wasn’t it? We were packed up and were heading out… Ha, that would have sucked to go all of the way there and to have missed that cavern!! A slight correction – in the video, I mention the collapse that we saw the other side of “in the last video.” It was actually the second video rather than the last video (that was a huge level). We’re not done with this mine yet! The fifth and final video in this series will be posted next Wednesday and there is some great stuff still to be seen. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 77078 TVR Exploring
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest  - Part 2
 
18:01
There is quite a lot to this abandoned mine site and so while I found a fair amount when I was wandering around on my own, I still missed interesting pieces of mining equipment that Michael showed me the next day. Further, I’m quite confident that there is plenty more scattered around in the brush or underneath the ruined buildings that we both missed. Eventually, forest fires will roar through all of the areas where these abandoned mines we document are located. When that happens, many hidden adits and pieces of metal equipment that were hidden away in brush will be revealed. It certainly isn’t in any way worth having a forest fire for, but it is an interesting side effect. As I mentioned in the prior video in this series, credit for our trip to this mine site goes to Gold Country Explorers. They get out in the forests (mostly in California’s Gold Country) and have an uncanny knack for tracking down stamp mills and other impressive elements of our industrial history – not to mention, a fair number of adits too! Check out their site – they post some great pictures on there: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ It felt good to discover that adit that the Forest Service missed near the top of the hill. They are pretty thorough, but some things are not easy to spot in the forest and many adits are not marked on the topographic map. As I mentioned in the video, I’d like to show you the portal and how this adit was essentially hiding in plain sight. However, if I post that, the Forest Service will be able to find it pretty easily and will be out there as soon as the snow melts to gate it. So, I reluctantly declined to share the view from the outside. Like I said in the video, we need to preserve some of our industrial history outside of a museum. I also think it is important to maintain at least something in the way of the spirit of adventure and the excitement of discovery in our increasingly fearful and risk-averse society. The site of the shaft that we visited toward the end of the video was so badly degraded that I mistakenly speculated that it was an adit (easy to do when there were adits all over the place). However, my subsequent research demonstrated that it was, in fact, a shaft. I could not find many records on it, but the shaft dropped down for almost four hundred feet and apparently had two levels to tap into the hard rock gold veins underground. The large waste rock pile all around that section is supposed to be from the shaft. I’m not sure how the ore was transported from the shaft to the mill, but I’d be curious to know. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 53137 TVR Exploring
Cat® K Series Large Wheel Loader Operator Training
 
25:30
This Cat® K Series Large Wheel Loader Operator Training video is designed to provide operators basic proficiency for efficient machine operation. This video is also designed to provide the viewer with a fundamental understanding of machine operator safety, location and function of operator controls, start-up and shutdown procedures, and overall basic operating procedures.
Exploring The Abandoned Calhoun Mine - Part 2 of 2
 
24:15
Chamber after chamber, drift after drift and level after level running in all directions created a massive labyrinth through the placer deposits in the upper sections of this mine... Even following “Right Hand Rules” in which every fork or junction that one comes to, one goes to the far right in order to not get lost (you go to the far left on the way out) was not sufficient to prevent me from making a couple of wrong turns and having to backtrack on the way out. I think you’ll understand why when you see what it is like in there! I had the impression that there might be more than I had expected on the upper levels after seeing so many ore passages on the level of the main haulage adit (which was itself larger than I anticipated). However, I was still stunned by the enormous workings on the upper levels. To me, they just seemed to go on forever and I ended up spending hours on these upper levels. Aside from the huge scale of the workings, I was also fascinated to be so deeply inside of the placer deposits. The placer is, of course, the compressed remains of the ancient river channels that used to run through this section of where the Sierra Nevada mountains are now. Composed as they are of sand, gravel and round river rock that is simply squeezed together, these placer deposits do not hold up well after breasting (the process of tunneling through and clearing out large chambers where these placer deposits are found). Normally, when we enter historic abandoned placer mines, we encounter major collapses once the mine hits a raise or stope that punched into the placer. This is quite frustrating as some of these mines have many thousands of feet of workings, but we are all too often stopped just a short ways inside the adit. As such, we rarely get to see the actual placer deposits. So, for me, it blew my mind to be so exceptionally deep inside all of these chambers and drifts that were composed entirely of placer deposits. Unquestionably, my favorite section in this abandoned mine was the very, very long and perfectly arched hallway that almost gave the impression of being inside a cathedral. This was one impressive abandoned mine and one that definitely deserves a return visit for more exploring… As reported in the last video, the earliest written records of this abandoned mine that I could find were newspaper articles dating back to 1908. However, the articles also mention that the mine used to be known by another name and dates back even earlier. So, we know that the mine is well over a century old. The most extensive work was apparently done during the 1920s and 1930s when thousands of feet of drifts were driven in (and apparently this is when the labyrinth was more fully developed). ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 12746 TVR Exploring
The Michigan Mine Mystery (See Description Below)
 
04:49
Please give me your opinion on this mystery in the comments section… In the video, I identify this abandoned mine as the Michigan Mine. I did so because this is how it was identified to me by a very knowledgeable local historian (who was herself advised by some of the mining old timers that were born and died in this area). However, after our visit, subsequent research leads me to believe that this may actually be the Nip & Tuck Company [Mine]. The Michigan Mine bordered the Nip & Tuck and the Nip & Tuck actually purchased the Michigan Mine in 1869 in order to obtain control of their ground. So, it is understandable that the names could be confused or even used interchangeably. However, I want to be as precise as possible with this stuff… So, tell me what you think: The Michigan Mine and the Nip & Tuck were both placer claims. However, the Michigan Mine was an adit driven back 3,000 feet into the Gibsonville Ridge. The Nip & Tuck Mine is described as being situated where a tunnel would have been too great of an expense to run and so a shaft was driven down to a depth of 230 feet. The work in this shaft was aided by a large steam engine situated next to the mine shaft. Further, there is a description of an area below the mine being used for washing the gravel being hauled out. Now, tell me that what you see in the video doesn’t look a lot more like the description of the Nip & Tuck instead of the Michigan Mine? There are documents indicating that 40 men worked at the Nip & Tuck Mine in 1870. And, although not a trace remains, there was supposedly an engine house built over the steam engine in addition to an abundance of skip cars and flumes on the site. The Nip & Tuck was apparently a profitable mine as an 1871 issue of Mining & Scientific Press describes the mine as returning a profit of 100% over expenses the previous autumn. The Michigan Mine, at its peak, apparently had 15 men working and even had a blacksmith living on site with his family. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 10519 TVR Exploring
Ventilation Control of Coal Dust in Mines 1980 MSHA
 
03:07
This 1980 MSHA film clip demonstrates various ventilation techniques to control dust including the use of proper face ventilation to effectively remove airborne dust. Over the years, some consensus has emerged on the best dust control practices. The NIOSH Publication, Handbook for Dust Control in Mining summarizes those practices and is available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/pubs/pubreference/outputid20.htm . This handbook describes effective methods for the control of mineral dusts in mines and tunnels for different kinds of mines and mining equipment. This includes underground coal and hard-rock mines, as well as surface mines, stone mines, and hard-rock tunnels. Dust control methods described are practical and cost-effective for most mine operators. This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 18146 markdcatlin
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest – Part 1
 
16:27
This mine was once made up of several smaller claims and the earliest records I can find on those date back to 1867. However, by the turn of the last century (1900), these appear to have all been consolidated into the large operation seen in the video. Given the large number of adits and trenches, the number of collapsed structures (I only showed a small number of them in the video), the large stamp mill and the need for a cemetery, this was obviously a significant mining community during its heyday. The guys I explored this site with are the Gold Country Explorers and credit goes to them for locating it. Gold Country Explorers find and post pictures of some really awesome places. You can find a link to their material here: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ To see one of those monster Fairbanks-Morse stationary engines running (and it is worth seeing), check out the great video at the link below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_0xifuTqVA An early (1800s) California State Mining Bureau report had this to say about the mill at the site: “A 20-stamp mill was located on the east side of the creek, with 900-pound stamps driven by a Knight wheel under 94’ of head from a 1,650’ long ditch; only one battery of stamps was reported as being in running order.” A later report (1900s) adds these additional details about the mill: “The mill at this time is described as possessing a 50-ton daily capacity, with a jaw crusher, 10 stamps, and ball mill in closed circuit with a Dorr classifier. Riffles were set below the stamps, and amalgamation plates below the ball mill. Three Fagergren flotation cells were followed by two Kraut cleaner-cells. A 200-hp diesel engine drove a generator to supply electric power, and a 440 cfm compressor was driven by a 100-hp motor.” Now, you may notice a discrepancy here as the first description mentions twenty stamps and the second description mentions ten stamps. As you saw in the video, the ruins of the mill at the mine site now has ten stamps. So, does that mean that an earlier mill was torn down and replaced by a new mill? Possibly. However, in the picture in the video, which was taken in 1937, a flume can be clearly seen leading toward the mill. Presumably, it was still being used when the photograph was taken because it appears to be maintained and in good condition. So, perhaps the mill was remodeled or rehabbed and ten stamps were taken away? The first report mentions that only one battery was in working order… In further support of this idea is the manufacturer’s stamp on the stamp mill itself. Union Iron Works of San Francisco ceased to be an independent company in 1902 when it was absorbed into a conglomerate called the United States Shipbuilding Company. This, therefore, dates the stamp mill to the time of the original report and would seem to suggest that it is the same mill. The last records of work being done at this mine date to 1939. You can perhaps better understand how everything is laid out at this abandoned gold mine by knowing that I did not backtrack or meander at all during the video, but continued in a steady downstream direction. So, the order in which objects of interest appear in the video are the order in which they are laid out across this sprawling site. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 35841 TVR Exploring
Exploring Nevada's Abandoned Shoshone Mine
 
18:54
This was kind of an odd abandoned mine… I often wonder how the miners know to start punching into the mountain in a particular spot, but that is especially the case with this one. I can only imagine that a prospector spotted a promising vein on the surface near the top of the mountain and followed it down into the earth (which would be where that void above the ore chute apparently connected with the surface). Without knowing where the vein ties into the surface, I cannot say why the miners chose to construct an incredibly long haulage adit rather than some sort of tram system. Perhaps they were extremely optimistic about the size of the vein and thought a haulage adit would be needed for the capacity of rock and ore they expected to move? Perhaps there is some physical barrier that makes construction of a tram system an impossible undertaking? Perhaps the miners simply didn’t have a lot of experience? I have learned not to play armchair general and second guess those who were there though. So, it is only with some reluctance that I mention that last possibility. With literally one ore chute in the entire mine, it is difficult to imagine that the miners involved in this project made a significant (if any) profit. The haulage adit they constructed was very long – far longer than is seen in the video as I had to edit much of it out in order to avoid putting you to sleep – and it would have been expensive and labor-intensive to burrow through the mountain like that. The drifts branching out around the ore chute tell me that the miners lost the vein they were following and were casting about trying to find it again or to locate a new one. Clearly, they were unsuccessful in doing so or this mine would be much larger than it is. That ore bin and the trestle over it on the surface were visually appealing, no? As I said in the video, if it were not for the metal frame surrounding it, I’m sure that would have collapsed by now. And, by the way, if anyone recognizes the remains of that metal equipment I showed against the cliff near the top of the ore bin, I’d love to know what that was. In case it wasn’t possible to tell in the video, the ore bin is sitting in the middle of a wash. At one time, trucks or wagons would have been brought straight up the wash and had the ore loaded directly into them. We could see the remains of the road on the hike in and much of the road was on the bottom of the wash itself where gravel (perhaps derived from the waste rock?) had been spread out to form a very nice road bed. However, water rushing through the wash over the decades has obliterated the road and returned the wash to its natural state. Very few sections remained that were still smooth gravel and even someone with a dirt bike would likely find it impossible to make it up to the mine without dismounting and walking in. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 25843 TVR Exploring