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Visualizing the end of malaria in Zambia
 
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Tableau Foundation supports PATH's work to use the power of innovation to improve health and save lives around the world.
Views: 445 Tableau Software
Youth For Change - BBC Media Action
 
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In July 2014 the UK government host #YouthforChange, an event developed by young people for young people to ignite action around girls' rights and strengthen young people as leaders of the future. The event will cover a broad range of issues relating to girls' rights and empowerment, showcasing positive and aspirational examples for change. For more information visit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediaaction/
Views: 369 bbcmediaaction
04 Keynote Conversation: Energy Ministers in conversation with Zeinab Badawi
 
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Keynote conversation: Energy ministers in conversation with Zeinab Badawi, International broadcaster and Chair, Royal Africa Society. Including: – Ghana’s Minister of Power Hon. Dr. Kwabena Donkor – Zambia’s Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Christopher Yaluma --- Norway-Africa Energy Summit 2015
Views: 2112 Arne Sigmund Skeie
Free Derry: The IRA Drug War
 
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Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News In February 2014, letter bombs were sent to nine British Military recruitment offices over the course of three days. Londonderry postmarks, a coded message sent to a Northern Irish newspaper, and security forces at Downing Street all pointed to the New IRA as the main suspects. Last Summer, VICE News visited Derry and heard from Gary Donnelly - the most prominent dissident republican in Londonderry, accused of leading operations for the Real IRA - that these attacks on Britain were to be expected as part of "strategic attacks on high profile targets," as "it's England that's occupying Ireland." In 'Free Derry: The IRA Drug War', VICE News investigate how, sixteen years after the Good Friday peace agreement and on the eve of the first major loyalist parade through the city in four years, dissident republican activity in Derry is increasing thanks to the merger of the Real IRA with anti-drugs vigilantes. VICE News reporter Alex Miller speaks to members of the Republican Action Against Drugs (RAAD), who formed the coalition with the Real IRA, and meets supporters as young as thirteen who are being armed with petrol bombs to combat criminal gangs and intervening police. For the first time, Paul Stewart, a close friend of slain Dublin Real IRA leader Alan Ryan, speaks on camera about witnessing the murder, as well as sharing insights on Ryan's war against drug dealers. Miller also interviews the mother of Andrew Smith, a man who she says was murdered by the Real IRA despite no affiliation with drugs related crime, before hearing from a Derry ex-drug dealer who now claims that, if the New IRA didn't fight drugs, "this town would be filled with ecstasy and rat poison and kids would be dying." VICE encounter a city where kneecappings and shootings are rife, walls are branded with anti-UK slogans, and where a policeman can scarcely walk down the street - according to Gary Donnelly - "without being killed". In "Free Derry: The IRA Drug War", VICE unmask the farcical veneer of the UK's 'City of Culture' 2013. Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Views: 2604034 VICE News
Zimbabwe | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Zimbabwe Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Zimbabwe (), officially the Republic of Zimbabwe, is a landlocked country located in southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo Rivers, bordered by South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique. The capital and largest city is Harare. A country of roughly 16 million people, Zimbabwe has 16 official languages, with English, Shona, and Ndebele the most commonly used. Since the 11th century, present-day Zimbabwe has been the site of several organised states and kingdoms as well as a major route for migration and trade. The British South Africa Company of Cecil Rhodes first demarcated the present territory during the 1890s; it became the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1923. In 1965, the conservative white minority government unilaterally declared independence as Rhodesia. The state endured international isolation and a 15-year guerrilla war with black nationalist forces; this culminated in a peace agreement that established universal enfranchisement and de jure sovereignty as Zimbabwe in April 1980. Zimbabwe then joined the Commonwealth of Nations, from which it was suspended in 2002 for breaches of international law by its then-government, and from which it withdrew in December 2003. The sovereign state is a member of the United Nations, the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). It was once known as the "Jewel of Africa" for its prosperity.Robert Mugabe became Prime Minister of Zimbabwe in 1980, when his ZANU-PF party won the elections following the end of white minority rule; he was the President of Zimbabwe from 1987 until his resignation in 2017. Under Mugabe's authoritarian regime, the state security apparatus dominated the country and was responsible for widespread human rights violations. Mugabe maintained the revolutionary socialist rhetoric of the Cold War era, blaming Zimbabwe's economic woes on conspiring Western capitalist countries. Contemporary African political leaders were reluctant to criticise Mugabe, who was burnished by his anti-imperialist credentials, though Archbishop Desmond Tutu called him "a cartoon figure of an archetypal African dictator". The country has been in economic decline since the 1990s, experiencing several crashes and hyperinflation along the way.On 15 November 2017, in the wake of over a year of protests against his government as well as Zimbabwe's rapidly declining economy, Mugabe was placed under house arrest by the country's national army in a coup d'état. On 19 November 2017, ZANU-PF sacked Robert Mugabe as party leader and appointed former Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa in his place. On 21 November 2017, Mugabe tendered his resignation prior to impeachment proceedings being completed.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
Congo and Africa's World War: Crash Course World History 221
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which used to be Zaire, which used to be The Belgian Congo, which used to be the Congo Free State, which used to be the region surrounding the Congo River Basin in central Africa. So the history of this place is a little convoluted. The history of Congo is central to the history of central Africa, and the Congo Wars embroiled neighboring countries like Uganda and Rwanda. John will talk you through the history of Congo and the region. You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. Citation 1: David van Reybrouck, Congo: The Epic History of a People. Trans. Sam Garrett. Harper Collins. 2014. Citation 2: van Reybrouck. p 468
Views: 1689037 CrashCourse
Primitive Technology: Spear Thrower
 
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A spear thrower is a simple tool that allows the user to throw a spear further than by hand alone. It is a small length of wood with a hook in the end that fits into a notch in the back of the spear. The extra power and distance gained by the thrower is due to the extra leverage it gives. I cut a small branch with a minor branch coming off the side. I shaped the minor branch into a spur to fit into the end of the spear. The thrower was about 65 cm long. For the spear, I cut a thin sapling approximately 2 m long and about 1.5 cm thick. I carved a cup in the end of the spear for the spur to fit into. Then I bound the back of the spear with bark fiber to prevent the wood from splitting. The head of the spear was simply charred in the fire and scrapped against a rock to sharpen it (during practice the head regularly breaks so only a sharpened tip is used to save work). To use the spear thrower, the spur of the thrower is inserted into the cup of the spear. The spear and thrower are held at about shoulder height. The thrower is quickly flicked forward and the spear propelled towards the target. As the spear leaves the thrower it bends slightly storing energy until it jumps of the spur. During flight, the flexible spear wobbles and oscillates paradoxically giving the spear some stability in flight. The throws in the video show what can be done in one afternoon of practice (my arm got sore and I wanted to start on other projects). I hit the target a few times at a distance 15 m. It is more powerful than a spear thrown by hand alone but is difficult to learn. The spear I made could have been a fraction lighter and so would have greater speed. Another improvement would be to add flights to the spear so it would be more accurate and fly straighter (like an atlatl). The extra energy gained from a Woomera's (Australian spear thrower) use has been calculated as 4 times that of compound bow (Wikipedia). It's easy to make (this took less than a day) but requires lots of training to become accurate. Wordpress: https://primitivetechnology.wordpress.com/ Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2945881&ty=h I have no face book page, instagram, twitter etc. Beware of fake pages and call them out on it!
Views: 14712023 Primitive Technology
What does government corruption mean to you?
 
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Reporters Uncensored (RUTV) Africa Correspondent Mwenya Mukeka interviews Dr. Guy Scott, Opposition Party member in Zambia on government corruption.
Views: 2122 reportersuncensored
Rhodesia
 
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Rhodesia (/roʊˈdiːʒə/, rə-DEE-zhə), officially the Republic of Rhodesia from 1970 to 1979, was an unrecognised state located in southern Africa during the Cold War. From 1965 to 1979, it comprised the region now known as Zimbabwe. The country, with its capital in Salisbury, was considered a de facto successor state to the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia (which had achieved responsible government in 1923). During an effort to delay an immediate transition to black majority rule, Rhodesia's predominantly white government issued its own Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) from the United Kingdom on 11 November 1965. The UDI administration initially sought recognition as an autonomous realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, but reconstituted itself as a republic in 1970. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3547 Audiopedia
Yelawolf - Daddy's Lambo
 
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Sign up for updates: http://smarturl.it/Yelawolf.News Music video by Yelawolf performing Daddy's Lambo. (C) 2011 DGC Records Best of Yelawolf: https://goo.gl/vy7NZQ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/ynkVDL
Views: 49848730 YelawolfVEVO
Migrants being sold as slaves in Libya
 
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Smugglers in Libya are auctioning migrants off as slaves. At a property outside Tripoli, CNN's Nima Elbagir witnessed a dozen men go under the hammer in the space of minutes.
Views: 1476314 CNN
The human cost of South Africa's mining industry
 
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BBC News More than 40 lawyers, representing hundreds of former and current mineworkers, have begun legal steps against South Africa's gold mining industry. They say the miners contracted silicosis, an incurable lung disease, from years of working in the mines.
Views: 40 International News
What is Bitcoin? (v2)
 
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The most watched Bitcoin introduction video ever. Updated in April 2014, this video explains how bitcoin works and the importance of this paradigm shifting technology. More information: Start Guide - https://www.weusecoins.com Mining Guide - https://www.bitcoinmining.com Podcast - http://www.bitcoin.kn Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/WeUseCoins Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/weusecoins
Views: 5978752 WeUseCoins
More Speed, Battery and Data with Opera Mini browser
 
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Top 3 Reasons to use Opera Mini browser: #1 More Speed, #2 More Battery Life, #3 More Data. Upgrade your browser! Install Opera Mini. http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.opera.mini.native
Views: 2336774 Opera
'Kick Vedanta out of London!'
 
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Protest 'Kick Vedanta out of London!' held at PLC's London offices Protesters mobilise to have Vedanta PLC delisted from the London Stock Exchange. They accuse the company of shady tax practices, environmental irresponsibility and poor safety practices in several countries including India and Zambia. http://www.demotix.com/news/1719463/protest-kick-vedanta-out-london-held-plcs-london-offices#media-1719339 ©See Li (Phototoday2008) All in UK Corporate events Events Organise & Promoter http://www.allinukcorporateevents.co.uk/
Views: 169 loveofpeace
Serge Michel & Paolo Woods | Talks at Google
 
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The [email protected] program welcomed Serge Michel and Paolo Woods to Google's New York office to discuss their book, "China Safari: On the Trail of Beijing's Expansion in Africa". "Serge Michel and Michel Beuret, tell the dramatic -- and largely unknown-- story of the rise of China's economic empire in Africa and how it stands to transform geopolitics. Over the course of nearly two years, Michel and Beuret traveled thousands of miles between China and Africa to report the story of this collaboration. Supplemented by the work of award-winning photojournalist Paolo Woods, China Safari establishes why the world is coming to realize Africa's potential and what role China is playing in the transformation." This event took place on July 22. 2009.
Views: 20832 Talks at Google
Sierra Leone
 
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Sierra Leone , officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa that is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. Sierra Leone is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and a unicameral legislature. The country has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savannah to rainforests. The country covers a total area of 71,740 km2 and with an estimated population of 6 million . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 5351 encyclopediacc
Barloworld Acquisition of Bucyrus with Clive Thomson
 
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(www.abndigital.com) Barloworld has today signed an agreement with and Caterpillar Global Mining to acquire the Bucyrus equipment distribution and support business in South Africa and Botswana. The total transaction is valued at approximately 175 million dollars and will be funded using a combination of cash resources, existing facilities and new bridge facilities. For more information, ABN's Samantha Loring is joined on the line by Barloworld CEO, Clive Thomson.
Views: 100 CNBCAfrica
U.S. Embassy bombing victims cry foul over Kerry Silence
 
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Kerry's failure to announce any material support to Kenyan victims of the August 7th 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing left many of them a disappointed lot. One of the survivors, Ali Mwadama, was left calling on the Kenya government to go on the diplomatic offensive and ensure that they were compensated by the U.S. government. Here is what he had to say soon after Kerry left the August 7th memorial park.
Views: 318 K24TV
Witbank Sex Workers
 
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Local sex workers were interviewed about their concerns and what they go through on a daily basis
Views: 125659 Witbank News
Hearing on The Long Arm of China: Global Efforts to Silence Critics From Tiananmen to Today
 
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Capitol Visitor Center, Room HVC 210 Washington, DC 20515 Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm This hearing will examine the Chinese government's reach beyond its borders to stifle critical discussion of its human rights record and repressive policies. China has long used its visa denial and censorship policies to muzzle discussion of the Tiananmen protests and their violent suppression by punishing and marginalizing the former student leaders and encouraging self-censorship among academics and foreign journalists writing about "sensitive" topics, including the events of 1989. Twenty-seven years after Tiananmen, these heavy-handed tactics are global in reach as China uses its diplomatic relationships and rising economic and trade clout as a means to achieve its aims. Recent cases represent an escalation of China's efforts to blunt scrutiny of its rights record and criticism of government policies. These efforts include pushing neighboring nations to crack down on dissidents who offer a critique of Beijing or to forcibly repatriate Uyghur refugees and Chinese asylum seekers; the disappearances and alleged abductions of five Hong Kong booksellers; clandestine efforts to discredit the Dalai Lama through a Communist Party-supported rival Buddhist sect; harassment of family members of foreign journalists and human rights advocates; and threats to the operations of non-governmental organizations engaged in work in China through the newly passed Overseas NGO Management Law and other means. Witnesses will discuss their own experiences with the "long arm" of the Chinese government and offer recommendations for Congressional and Administration action. WITNESSES: Su Yutong: Journalist, Internet activist, human rights defender, and former news broadcaster, the Chinese service of Deutsche Welle Angela Gui: Student and daughter of disappeared Hong Kong bookseller Gui Minhai Teng Biao: Chinese human rights lawyer, Visiting Fellow, U.S.-Asia Law Institute, NYU Law School, and Co-founder, the Open Constitution Initiative
7 G-spot Facts You Should Really Know
 
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http://bit.ly/sub2Gurl "7 G-spot Facts You Should Really Know" In this episode, Cheyenne is here to share some information about the G-spot. Watch the video for a list of 7 facts to know. For more fun Gurl stuff, check us out http://www.gurl.com/ And there's always tons of talk and lots of cool girls on our boards: http://my.gurl.com/ Gurl hearts you big time! Do you heart us? Then be our bud: Subscribe: http://bit.ly/sub2Gurl Boards: http://my.gurl.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/Gurl.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/GurlDotCom Tumblr: http://Gurl.tumblr.com
Views: 3131418 Gurl.com
MIT Museum Soap Box Series: INFECTioUS - Communication
 
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INFECTioUS: Conversations on understanding and communicating about disease (Fall 2016, MIT Museum) The MIT Museum held a three-part, salon-style series on infectious diseases and participants added their voices to the discussion while meeting new people and learning about current research in the field. This event was held October 5, and the topic was "Communication." Speakers included: Adam Hume, Researcher, Boston Medical Center, and Rod McCullom, Journalist, Knight Journalism Fellow.
Views: 44 MIT Museum
Washington, DC: Community Bank Advisory Council
 
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www.consumerfinance.gov
Views: 609 cfpbvideo
TodaysNetworkNews: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL OUTLOOK REPORT & RIO+20 (UNEP)
 
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MaximsNewsNetwork: (http://www.MaximsNews.com ) 06 June 2012: United Nations Environmental Programme: UNEP: Nairobi, Kenya - A new and wide-ranging assessment coordinated by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) says that the world continues to speed down an unsustainable path, often failing to meet internationally agreed goals on managing the environment and improving human wellbeing; in the fifth edition of the Global Environmental Outlook (GEO-5), launched today (6 June) ahead of the Rio+20 Summit, assessed 90 of the most important environmental goals and objectives and found that significant progress had only been made in four -- a sobering balance, according to the head of UNEP, Achim Steiner. SOUNDBITE (English) Achim Steiner, Executive Director, UN Environment Programme (UNEP): "The GEO5 report provides a sobering balance sheet of the last years, and it provides a number of clear indicators that on most of the internationally environmentally agreed goals that already exist, we have either not been able to make a great deal of progress, very often have failed to meet those goals, or in many instances are also still confronted by the fact that we are not able to measure and track progress." "Significant progress" was made in eliminating the production and use of substances that deplete the ozone layer, removal of lead from fuel, increasing access to improved water supplies and boosting research to reduce pollution of the marine environment. Little or no progress was detected for 24 goals -- including climate change, fish stocks, and desertification and drought. Further deterioration was posted for eight goals including the state of the world's coral reefs. The UNEP report comes two weeks before world leaders will gather in Rio de Janeiro to agree new ways to reduce poverty, to advance social equity and to ensure environmental protection. More than a hundred heads of state are expected to attend the Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) from 20 to 22 June. One of the summit's themes is a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. From Nairobi, UNEP's Deputy Executive Director Amina Mohamed today urged the Rio participants to see the GEO5 report as a call to action. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohamed, UNEP Deputy Executive Director: "The time has come to finally put aside indecision and emerge with a renewed commitment to achieving a low carbon, resource efficient green economy that will ensure sustainable development." UNEP's chief scientist, Joseph Alcamo pointed to the innovative way the GEO5 report links solutions to environmental problems with their potential in the green economy. SOUNDBITE (English) Joseph Alcamo, UNEP Chief Scientist: "The green economy has the potential to be the key idea to finally break down this artificial barrier between the economy and the environment that's existed. It's provided some very key ideas that are embodied in the GEO5 report. One idea is that this thing we talk about -- environment -- actually we should call it natural capital." For example, Alcamo said the value of inland fishery in the tropics alone was worth $6 billion. The global fishing sector also accounted for up to 180 million jobs. SOUNDBITE (English) Joseph Alcamo, UNEP Chief Scientist: "The second important insight that green economy brings us is that the protection of the environment, the protection of our natural capital, can be a job engine." About two million people are currently working in the renewable energy industry, according to Alcamo, and this might rise to around 20 million within a decade or so. ( UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMME: UNEP, Nairobi, Kenya ) MaximsNewsNetwork®™ & WorldLeadersTelevision™ News Network for the United Nations and the International Community™ "GIVING POWER & RESONANCE TO THE VOICE OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY" ™ See: http://www.MaximsNews.com See: http://www.WorldLeadersTV.com ASIA100TVNet™ ASIATV100Net™ MAGNUMMAXIM™ TodaysNetworkNews™ WORLDMAGNUM™ GLOBALMAXIM™ TODAYSNETNEWS™ NewsNetworkToday™ NetworkNewsToday™ Internationally Accredited News Journalists and members of the United Nations Correspondence Association (UNCA)
Views: 28 TodaysNetworkNews
Dr. Peter David Beter - Audio Letter 36: John Rockfeller; American Strategy; War - July 27, 1978
 
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Dr. Peter David Beter - Audio Letter 36 - July 27, 1978 Text: http://www.peterdavidbeter.com/docs/all/dbal36.html MP3: http://archive.org/download/DrPeterBeter_AudioVideoLetters/drpeterbetter_audioletter_36.mp3 (1) The legacy of the late John D. Rockefeller III (2) The new American strategy for a first strike (3) The aftermath of Nuclear War I " Hello, my friends, this is Dr. Beter. Today is July 27, 1978, and this is my Audioletter No. 36. For three generations the Rockefeller dynasty has been a dominant factor in the economic, political, and social life of America. And for three decades four Rockefeller brothers of the third generation--David, Nelson, Laurance, and John D. III--have been the real rulers of the Western world. Long ago they carved up the world into spheres of influence; but by coordinating their activities and working as a unit, the four brothers have held unparalleled sway over the fate of all mankind. But three years ago this month in Audioletter No. 2, I revealed that the brothers were beginning to lose their iron grip on events. For example, Nelson Rockefeller had been planning to replace then President Gerald Ford in the Oval Office no later than June, 1975; but Ford survived the strange illness that sent him crashing downstairs in aircraft ramps during that month--and he has had no more falling spells in the three years since then. A few months later, in September and October, 1975, a rash of assassination attempts almost removed Ford from the scene, but those too were bungled. Two years ago this month in Audioletter No. 14, I revealed that the Underwater Missile Crisis of 1976 was underway. This crisis, which the government has NEVER made public, was only the beginning of a total military double-cross of the Rockefellers by their secret ally, the Soviet Union. As I have made public the previous spring in Audioletter No. 12, key trustees of the Rockefeller controlled major Foundations had already concluded that a Russian double-cross was imminent, but the Brothers themselves had not agreed with that conclusion. They had grown up knowing that the Soviet Union was secretly financed and dominated by their own Rockefeller Cartel. They simply could not imagine that Russia might somehow slip from their grasp. Only when a Russian hydrogen bomb was recovered from the waters of Seal Harbor, Maine, did the four brothers really believe that a military double-cross was under way. I had given its exact navigational coordinates in Audioletter No. 15 for August, 1976, and it was removed late that month by the United States Navy. This bomb was one of the topics I discussed with General George S. Brown, then Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in my meeting with him at the Pentagon on September 16, 1976. Once they knew that Russia truly was preparing for a surprise nuclear attack on America, the Brothers could have taken steps to prevent war altogether; but that would have involved letting the public in on the truth--and as our Lord has said, "The truth shall make you free." The Rockefeller brothers are not interested in your freedom and mine, but in ever more power, so they tried to reinstate their alliance with the Soviets. And in order to re-establish the carefully controlled joint plan for nuclear war on American soil, the Rockefellers made tremendous concessions to appease the Kremlin. One of these concessions led to the opening of the doors for Soviet nuclear saboteurs to swarm all over the United States planting nuclear mines large and small at dams, reservoirs, public buildings, manufacturing plants, grain elevators, refineries, and many other targets. For that reason, at this time last year my Audioletter was in a state of voluntary suspension. For three months, from late May to late August 1977, I cooperated with concerned citizens nation-wide in an effort to bring about decisive exposure and official action to stop the wholesale nuclear sabotage of America. But those efforts failed, my friends, as I revealed for you last August when I resumed the Audioletter with issue No. 25. Through all of these events and more, the declining power and resolve of the four brothers was becoming more and more apparent, but all of these setbacks paled into insignificance beside America's disastrous defeat in space last September. In the Battle of the Harvest Moon, the secret American moon base in Copernicus Crater was knocked out. Armed with powerful Beam Weapons able to strike any spot on earth, the Copernicus base had been the Rockefellers' ace in the hole in the war to come--but now it was gone. This decisive Space Battle still has not been admitted publicly by the government, but is the real reason for the many desperate anti-Russian moves now under way by America. [...]"
Views: 210 Peter Beter
Angolan Civil War Documentary Film
 
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The Angolan Civil War was a major civil conflict in the Southern African state of Angola, beginning in 1975 and continuing, with some interludes, until 2002. The war began immediately after Angola became independent from Portugal in November 1975. Prior to this, a decolonization conflict had taken place in 1974--75, following the Angolan War of Independence. The Civil War was primarily a struggle for power between two former liberation movements, the People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA). At the same time, it served as a surrogate battleground for the Cold War, due to heavy intervention by major opposing powers such as the Soviet Union and the United States. Each organisation had different roots in the Angolan social fabric and mutually incompatible leaderships, despite their sharing the aim of ending colonial occupation. Although both the MPLA and UNITA had socialist leanings, for the purpose of mobilizing international support they posed as "Marxist-Leninist" and "anti-communist", respectively. A third movement, the National Front for the Liberation of Angola (FNLA), having fought the MPLA alongside UNITA during the war for independence and the decolonization conflict, played almost no role in the Civil War. Additionally, the Front for the Liberation of the Enclave of Cabinda (FLEC), an association of separatist militant groups, fought for the independence of the province of Cabinda from Angola. The 27-year war can be divided roughly into three periods of major fighting -- between 1975 and 1991, 1992 and 1994, and 1998 and 2002 -- broken up by fragile periods of peace. By the time the MPLA finally achieved victory in 2002, an estimated 500,000 people had been killed and over one million internally displaced. The war devastated Angola's infrastructure, and dealt severe damage to the nation's public administration, economic enterprises, and religious institutions. The Angolan Civil War reached such dimensions due to the combination of Angola's violent internal dynamics and massive foreign intervention. Both the Soviet Union and the United States considered the conflict critical to the global balance of power and to the outcome of the Cold War, and they and their allies put significant effort into making it a proxy war between their two power blocs. The Angolan Civil War ultimately became one of the bloodiest, longest, and most prominent armed conflicts of the Cold War. Moreover, the Angolan conflict became entangled with the Second Congo War in the neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as with the Namibian War of Independence. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angolan_civil_war
Views: 355170 The Film Archives
2nd Annual Rochester Global Health Symposium
 
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Innovative Solutions to Combat Global Health Disparities April 21, 2016, 8:30am to 5:15pm (United Stated EDT, UTC/GMT -04:00) This year’s symposium brings together leaders in global health research from Upstate New York and around the world to promote research collaboration, provide networking opportunities and help new researchers begin a career in global health. Students, trainees, junior faculty and senior faculty are all invited! The one-day event includes timely presentations on global health issues, a poster session, a student poster competition, and breakout sessions. Multiple networking opportunities will give participants a chance to share ideas one-on-one and connect with experts in the field. [All times below are in United States EDT (UTC/GMT -04:00)] 8:30 am: Welcome/Overview of the Global Network/Overview of UNYTE & Introduction of Speakers (Tim Dye, PhD and Nana Bennett, MD, MS; University of Rochester) 8:50am: Highlight Topic 1: Global Health Policy (Neal Palafox, MD, MPH; University of Hawai’i) 9:10am: Highlight Topic 2: Global Cancer Prevention and Control (Jennifer Smith, PhD; University of North Carolina) 9:30am: Highlight Topic 3: Zika Virus and Health Diplomacy (Mehran Massoudi, PhD, MPH; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) 9:50am: Highlight Topic 4: Mobilizing food systems for Improved Health and Nutrition (Per Pinstrup-Andersen, PhD, MS; Cornell University) 10:10am: Highlight Topic 5: Global Health and Technology: New Solutions for Development (Saurabh Mehta, MBBS, ScD; Cornell University) 10:30am: Q&A for Highlight Topic Speakers 10:40am: Networking Break 11:15am: Rapid Fire Sessions - Connections Between Prematurity and Toxic Substances in Puerto Rico: From Genomic Research to Community Engagement, Carmen Vélez-Vega, University of Puerto Rico - Health Care System in Costa Rica, Esteban Avendaño MD MPH, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas - Mercury exposure from fish consumption: A global public health concern, Edwin VanWijngaarden PhD, University of Rochester - Capacity Building in Zimbabwe: Linking Patient Support Groups with HIV Clinical Pharmacology Research Initiatives, Samantha Sithole PharmD, University at Buffalo - HIV, HPV, and Cervical Dysplasia in South Africa, David Adler MD, University of Rochester 12:15pm: Poster Session - join us for a stroll through the poster session to meet presenters and learn about their research. Zika/Mosquito-Borne Illness Symposium – Moderator: Mehran Massoudi PhD 1:45pm: Zika in pregnancy/planned cohort studies - José Cordero , MD MPH 2:05pm: TBD 2:25pm: Mobile surveillance technology - Solomon Abiola/José Pérez-Ramos 2:45pm: Q&A 3:50pm: Policy, System, and Environmental Interventions in Global Cancer Control – Angela Sy PhD, Neal Palafox MD, Karen Peters DrPH 4:00pm: Panel Discussion – Building partnerships in global health research/Careers in global health – Tim Dye PhD, Mehran Massoudi PhD, Karen Peters DrPH, Haq Nawaz MD, Esteban Avendaño MD, Deborah Ossip PhD 5:00 pm: Announcement of poster session awards; closing – Tim Dye PhD
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 184822 Shari Wing
Sierra Leone | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:57:41
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sierra Leone Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Sierra Leone (, UK also ), officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. It has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savanna to rainforests. The country has a total area of 71,740 km2 (27,699 sq mi) and a population of 7,075,641 as of the 2015 census. Sierra Leone is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and a unicameral legislature. Sierra Leone has a dominant unitary central government. The president is the head of state and the head of government. The country's capital and largest city is Freetown. Kenema, located 185 miles from Freetown, is the country's second most populous city. Other major cities with a population above one hundred thousand are Bo, Koidu Town and Makeni. Sierra Leone is made up of five administrative regions: the Northern Province, North West Province, Eastern Province, Southern Province and the Western Area. These regions are subdivided into sixteen districts.Sierra Leone became independent from the United Kingdom on 27 April 1961, led by Sir Milton Margai, who became the country's first prime minister. In May 1962, Sierra Leone held its first general elections as an independent nation. Siaka Stevens" All People's Congress won the 1967 Sierra Leone parliamentary election over the governing Sierra Leone People's Party. Stevens ruled Sierra Leone from 1968 to 1985 in which he was intolerant of opponents and critics of his government. In 1971, Stevens abolished Sierra Leone's parliamentary government system and declared Sierra Leone a presidential republic. Sierra Leone was a one-party state from 1978 to 1985, in which Stevens' All People's Congress was the only legal political party in the country. The current constitution of Sierra Leone, which includes multi party democracy, was adopted in 1991 by the government of President Joseph Saidu Momoh, Stevens' hand-picked successor. In 1991, a rebel group known as the Revolutionary United Front led by former Sierra Leone army Corporal Foday Sankoh launched a brutal civil war in the country. In April 1992 a group of Junior military officers toppled Momoh from power and 25-year-old Captain Valentine Strasser became the head of state. In January 1996 Strasser was toppled from power by his deputy, Brigadier General Julius Maada Bio. Bio returned the country to multi-party democracy and the 1991 constitution was reestablished. Bio handed power to Ahmad Tejan Kabbah of the Sierra Leone People's Party after his victory in the 1996 Sierra Leone presidential election. In 1997, the military overthrew president Kabbah. However, in February 1998, a coalition of West African Ecowas armed forces led by Nigeria, removed the military Junta from power by force and president Kabbah was reinstated as president. In 1998, the coup leaders were executed after they were sentenced to death by a military court martial. Sierra Leone has had an uninterrupted democracy since 1998 to present. In January 2002, President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah fulfilled his campaign promise by officially ending the civil war as the rebels were defeated by military force with the help and support of Ecowas, the British government, the African Union, and the United Nations. About 16 ethnic groups inhabit Sierra Leone, each with its own language and customs. The two largest and most influential are the Temne and Mende. The Temne are predominantly found in the northwest of the country, and the Mende are predominant in the southeast. Comprising a small minority, about 2%, are the Krio people, who are descendants of freed African-American and West Indian slaves. The Krios are overwhelmingly found in the capital Freetown and its surrounding countryside. Although English is the official language, used in schools and government administration, Krio, an English-based creole, is the most widely spoken language across Sierr ...
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Sierra Leone | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:57:41
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sierra Leone Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Sierra Leone (, UK also ), officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. It has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savanna to rainforests. The country has a total area of 71,740 km2 (27,699 sq mi) and a population of 7,075,641 as of the 2015 census. Sierra Leone is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and a unicameral legislature. Sierra Leone has a dominant unitary central government. The president is the head of state and the head of government. The country's capital and largest city is Freetown. Kenema, located 185 miles from Freetown, is the country's second most populous city. Other major cities with a population above one hundred thousand are Bo, Koidu Town and Makeni. Sierra Leone is made up of five administrative regions: the Northern Province, North West Province, Eastern Province, Southern Province and the Western Area. These regions are subdivided into sixteen districts.Sierra Leone became independent from the United Kingdom on 27 April 1961, led by Sir Milton Margai, who became the country's first prime minister. In May 1962, Sierra Leone held its first general elections as an independent nation. Siaka Stevens" All People's Congress won the 1967 Sierra Leone parliamentary election over the governing Sierra Leone People's Party. Stevens ruled Sierra Leone from 1968 to 1985 in which he was intolerance of opposions and critics of his government. In 1971, Stevens abolished Sierra Leone's parliamentary government system and declared Sierra Leone a presidential republic. Sierra Leone was a one-party state from 1978 to 1985, in which Stevens' All People's Congress was the only legal political party in the country. The current constitution of Sierra Leone, which includes multi party democracy, was adopted in 1991 by the government of President Joseph Saidu Momoh, Stevens' hand-picked successor. In 1991, a rebel group known as the Revolutionary United Front led by former Sierra Leone army Corporal Foday Sankoh launched a brutal civil war in the country. In April 1992 a group of Junior military officers toppled Momoh from power and 25-year-old Captain Valentine Strasser became the head of state. In January 1996 Strasser was toppled from power by his deputy, Brigadier General Julius Maada Bio. Bio returned the country to multi-party democracy and the 1991 constitution was reestablished. Bio handed power to Ahmad Tejan Kabbah of the Sierra Leone People's Party after his victory in the 1996 Sierra Leone presidential election. In 1997, the military overthrew president Kabbah. However, in February 1998, a coalition of West African Ecowas armed forces led by Nigeria, removed the military Junta from power by force and president Kabbah was reinstated as president. In 1998, the coup leaders were executed after they were sentenced to death by a military court martial. Sierra Leone has had an uninterrupted democracy since 1998 to present. In January 2002, President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah fulfilled his campaign promise by officially ending the civil war as the rebels were defeated by military force with the help and support of Ecowas, the British government, the African Union, and the United Nations. About 16 ethnic groups inhabit Sierra Leone, each with its own language and customs. The two largest and most influential are the Temne and Mende. The Temne are predominantly found in the northwest of the country, and the Mende are predominant in the southeast. Comprising a small minority, about 2%, are the Krio people, who are descendants of freed African-American and West Indian slaves. The Krios are overwhelmingly found in the capital Freetown and its surrounding countryside. Although English is the official language, used in schools and government administration, Krio, an English-based creole, is the most widely spoken language across Sier ...
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
Rhodesia | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Rhodesia Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Rhodesia (, ) was an unrecognised state in southern Africa from 1965 to 1979, equivalent in territory to modern Zimbabwe. Rhodesia was the de facto successor state to the British colony of Southern Rhodesia, which had been self-governing since achieving responsible government in 1923. A landlocked nation, Rhodesia was bordered by South Africa to the south, Bechuanaland (later Botswana) to the southwest, Zambia to the northwest, and Mozambique (a Portuguese province until 1975) to the east. In the late 19th century, the territory north of the Transvaal was chartered to the British South Africa Company, led by Cecil Rhodes. Rhodes and his Pioneer Column marched north in 1890, acquiring a huge bloc of territory that the Company would rule until the early 1920s. In 1923, the Company's charter was revoked, and Southern Rhodesia attained self-government and established a legislature. Between 1953 and 1963, Southern Rhodesia was joined with Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland in the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. The decolonisation of Africa in the early 1960s alarmed a significant proportion of Rhodesia's white population. In an effort to delay the transition to black majority rule, Rhodesia's predominantly white government issued its own Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) from the United Kingdom on 11 November 1965. (The government of the United Kingdom supported Rhodesia's transition to a multi-racial democracy.) The UDI administration initially sought recognition as an autonomous realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, but reconstituted itself as a republic in 1970. The Rhodesian Bush War, which pitted the government against two African nationalist organisations, ZANU and ZAPU, intensified in the 1970s, prompting Rhodesian premier Ian Smith to concede to multiracial democracy in 1978. However, a provisional government subsequently headed by Smith and his moderate colleague Abel Muzorewa failed in appeasing international critics or halting the bloodshed. By December 1979, Muzorewa had replaced Smith as Prime Minister and secured an agreement with the militant nationalists, allowing Rhodesia to briefly revert to colonial status pending elections under a universal franchise. It finally achieved internationally recognised independence in April 1980 as the Republic of Zimbabwe. Rhodesia's largest cities were its capital, Salisbury, and Bulawayo. The white population, which grew to nearly 300,000, dominated the country's politics and economy, though they never made up more than eight percent of the total population. Rhodesia developed an economy largely dependent on agriculture, manufacturing, and mining. Its largest exports were chrome, tobacco, and steel. International sanctions put increasing pressure on the country as time went on. The Parliament of Rhodesia, which included the lower House of Assembly and later a Senate, was predominantly white, with minority of seats reserved for blacks. After 1970, the country used a semi-presidential system, with a President, Prime Minister, and cabinet.
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Democratic Republic of the Congo | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:23:58
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Democratic Republic of the Congo Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Democratic Republic of the Congo ( pronunciation French: République démocratique du Congo [kɔ̃ɡo]), also known as DR Congo, the DRC, Congo-Kinshasa, East Congo, or simply the Congo, is the southernmost country located in Central Africa. It is sometimes referred to by its former name of Zaire, which was its official name between 1971 and 1997. The DRC borders the Central African Republic to the north; South Sudan to the northeast; Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania to the east; Zambia to the south; Angola to the southwest; and the Republic of the Congo and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. It is the second-largest country in Africa after Algeria (the largest in Sub-Saharan Africa) by area and the 11th-largest in the world. With a population of over 78 million, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most populated officially Francophone country, the fourth-most-populated country in Africa, and the 16th-most-populated country in the world. Centred on the Congo Basin, the territory of the DRC was first inhabited by Central African foragers around 90,000 years ago and was reached by the Bantu expansion about 3,000 years ago. In the west, the Kingdom of Kongo ruled around the mouth of the Congo River from the 14th to 19th centuries. In the centre and east, the kingdoms of Luba and Lunda ruled from the 16th and 17th centuries to the 19th century. In the 1870s, just before the onset of the Scramble for Africa, European exploration of the Congo Basin was carried out, first led by Henry Morton Stanley under the sponsorship of King Leopold II of Belgium. Leopold formally acquired rights to the Congo territory at the Berlin Conference in 1885 and made the land his private property, naming it the Congo Free State. During the Free State, the colonial military unit, the Force Publique, forced the local population to produce rubber, and from 1885 to 1908, millions of Congolese died as a consequence of disease and exploitation. In 1908, Belgium, despite initial reluctance, formally annexed the Free State, which became the Belgian Congo. The Belgian Congo achieved independence on 30 June 1960 under the name Republic of the Congo. Congolese nationalist Patrice Lumumba was elected the first Prime Minister, while Joseph Kasa-Vubu became the first President. Conflict arose over the administration of the territory, which became known as the Congo Crisis. The provinces of Katanga, under Moïse Tshombe, and South Kasai attempted to secede. After Lumumba turned to the Soviet Union for assistance in the crisis, the U.S. and Belgium became wary and oversaw his removal from office by Kasa-Vubu on 5 September and ultimate execution by Belgian-led Katangese troops on 17 January 1961. On 25 November 1965, Army Chief of Staff Joseph-Désiré Mobutu, who later renamed himself Mobutu Sese Seko, officially came into power through a coup d'état. In 1971, he renamed the country Zaire. The country was run as a dictatorial one-party state, with his Popular Movement of the Revolution as the sole legal party. Mobutu's government received considerable support from the United States, due to its anti-communist stance during the Cold War. By the early 1990s, Mobutu's government began to weaken. Destabilisation in the east resulting from the 1994 Rwandan genocide and disenfranchisement among the eastern Banyamulenge (Congolese Tutsi) population led to a 1996 invasion led by Tutsi FPR-ruled Rwanda, which began the First Congo War.On 17 May 1997, Laurent-Désiré Kabila, a leader of Tutsi forces from the province of South Kivu, became President after Mobutu fled to Morocco, reverting the country's name to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Tensions between President Kabila and the Rwandan and Tutsi presence in the country led to the Second Congo War from 1998 to 2003. Ultimately, nine African countries and around twenty armed groups became involved in the war, which resulted in the deaths of 5.4 million people. The two wars de ...
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Zimbabwe | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:36:49
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Zimbabwe Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Zimbabwe (), officially the Republic of Zimbabwe, is a landlocked country located in southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo Rivers, bordered by South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique. The capital and largest city is Harare. A country of roughly 16 million people, Zimbabwe has 16 official languages, with English, Shona, and Ndebele the most commonly used. Since the 11th century, present-day Zimbabwe has been the site of several organised states and kingdoms as well as a major route for migration and trade. The British South Africa Company of Cecil Rhodes first demarcated the present territory during the 1890s; it became the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1923. In 1965, the conservative white minority government unilaterally declared independence as Rhodesia. The state endured international isolation and a 15-year guerrilla war with black nationalist forces; this culminated in a peace agreement that established universal enfranchisement and de jure sovereignty as Zimbabwe in April 1980. Zimbabwe then joined the Commonwealth of Nations, from which it was suspended in 2002 for breaches of international law by its then-government, and from which it withdrew in December 2003. The sovereign state is a member of the United Nations, the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). It was once known as the "Jewel of Africa" for its prosperity.Robert Mugabe became Prime Minister of Zimbabwe in 1980, when his ZANU-PF party won the elections following the end of white minority rule; he was the President of Zimbabwe from 1987 until his resignation in 2017. Under Mugabe's authoritarian regime, the state security apparatus dominated the country and was responsible for widespread human rights violations. Mugabe maintained the revolutionary socialist rhetoric of the Cold War era, blaming Zimbabwe's economic woes on conspiring Western capitalist countries. Contemporary African political leaders were reluctant to criticise Mugabe, who was burnished by his anti-imperialist credentials, though Archbishop Desmond Tutu called him "a cartoon figure of an archetypal African dictator". The country has been in economic decline since the 1990s, experiencing several crashes and hyperinflation along the way.On 15 November 2017, in the wake of over a year of protests against his government as well as Zimbabwe's rapidly declining economy, Mugabe was placed under house arrest by the country's national army in a coup d'état. On 19 November 2017, ZANU-PF sacked Robert Mugabe as party leader and appointed former Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa in his place. On 21 November 2017, Mugabe tendered his resignation prior to impeachment proceedings being completed.
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Angola | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:06:26
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Angola Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Angola ( ( listen); Portuguese: [ɐ̃ˈɡɔlɐ]), officially the Republic of Angola (Portuguese: República de Angola; Kikongo, Kimbundu and Umbundu: Repubilika ya Ngola), is a west-coast country of south-central Africa. It is the seventh-largest country in Africa, bordered by Namibia to the south, the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the north, Zambia to the east, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Angola has an exclave province, the province of Cabinda that borders the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The capital and largest city of Angola is Luanda. Although inhabited since the Paleolithic Era, what is now Angola was molded by Portuguese colonisation. It began with, and was for centuries limited to, coastal settlements and trading posts established starting in the 16th century. In the 19th century, European settlers slowly and hesitantly began to establish themselves in the interior. The Portuguese colony that became Angola did not have its present borders until the early 20th century because of resistance by groups such as the Cuamato, the Kwanyama and the Mbunda. After a protracted anti-colonial struggle, independence was achieved in 1975 as the Marxist–Leninist People's Republic of Angola, a one-party state supported by the Soviet Union and Cuba. The civil war between the ruling People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) and the insurgent anti-communist National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), supported by the United States and apartheid South Africa, lasted until 2002. The sovereign state has since become a relatively stable unitary, presidential constitutional republic. Angola has vast mineral and petroleum reserves, and its economy is among the fastest-growing in the world, especially since the end of the civil war; however, the standard of living remains low for most of the population, and life expectancy in Angola is among the lowest in the world, while infant mortality is among the highest. Angola's economic growth is highly uneven, with most of the nation's wealth concentrated in a disproportionately small sector of the population.Angola is a member state of the United Nations, OPEC, African Union, the Community of Portuguese Language Countries, and the Southern African Development Community. A highly multiethnic country, Angola's 25.8 million people span tribal groups, customs, and traditions. Angolan culture reflects centuries of Portuguese rule, in the predominance of the Portuguese language and of the Catholic Church.
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Patrice Lumumba
 
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Patrice Émery Lumumba (born Élias Okit'Asombo; 2 July 1925 – 17 January 1961) was a Congolese independence leader and the first democratically elected Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo (now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo). As founder and leader of the Mouvement national congolais, Lumumba helped win his country's independence from Belgium in 1960. Within twelve weeks, Lumumba's government was deposed in a coup during the Congo Crisis. The main reason why he was ousted from power was his opposition to Belgian-backed secession of the mineral-rich Katanga province. Lumumba was subsequently imprisoned by state authorities under Joseph-Desiré Mobutu and executed by firing squad under the command of the secessionist Katangan authorities. The United Nations, which he had asked to come to the Congo, did not intervene to save him. Belgium, the United States (via the CIA), and the United Kingdom (via MI6) have all been accused of involvement in Lumumba's death. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 678 Audiopedia
Greenpeace
 
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Greenpeace is a .non-governmental environmental organization with offices in over forty countries and with an international coordinating body in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Greenpeace states its goal is to "ensure the ability of the Earth to nurture life in all its diversity" and focuses its campaigning on world wide issues such as global warming, deforestation, overfishing, commercial whaling, genetic engineering, and anti-nuclear issues. It uses direct action, lobbying and research to achieve its goals. The global organization does not accept funding from governments, corporations or political parties, relying on 2.9 million individual supporters and foundation grants. Greenpeace has a general consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council and is a founding member of the INGO Accountability Charter; an international non-governmental organization that intends to foster accountability and transparency of non-governmental organizations. Greenpeace is known for its direct actions and has been described as the most visible environmental organization in the world. Greenpeace has raised environmental issues to public knowledge, and influenced both the private and the public sector. Greenpeace has also been a source of controversy; its motives and methods have received criticism and the organization's direct actions have sparked legal actions against Greenpeace activists, such as fines and suspended sentences for destroying a test plot of GMO wheat. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 228 Audiopedia
BP
 
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BP
As of December 2013, BP had operations in approximately 80 countries, produced around 3.2 million barrels per day (510,000 m3/d) of oil equivalent, had total proved reserves of 17.9 billion barrels (2.85×109 m3) of oil equivalent, and had around 17,800 service stations. Its largest division is BP America, which is the second-largest producer of oil and gas in the United States. BP owns a 19.75% stake in the Russian oil major Rosneft, the world's largest publicly traded oil and gas company by hydrocarbon reserves and production. BP has a primary listing on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index; it had a market capitalisation of £85.2 billion as of April 2013, the fourth-largest of any company listed on the exchange. It has secondary listings on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 774 encyclopediacc
Man Having SEX Glued To Another Man's Wife
 
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This is a common thing in Africa where some men take advantage of one thing or the order to have sex with other peoples wife.
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Angola | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Angola Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Angola ( ( listen); Portuguese: [ɐ̃ˈɡɔlɐ]), officially the Republic of Angola (Portuguese: República de Angola; Kikongo, Kimbundu and Umbundu: Repubilika ya Ngola), is a west-coast country of south-central Africa. It is the seventh-largest country in Africa, bordered by Namibia to the south, the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the north, Zambia to the east, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Angola has an exclave province, the province of Cabinda that borders the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The capital and largest city of Angola is Luanda. Although inhabited since the Paleolithic Era, what is now Angola was molded by Portuguese colonisation. It began with, and was for centuries limited to, coastal settlements and trading posts established starting in the 16th century. In the 19th century, European settlers slowly and hesitantly began to establish themselves in the interior. The Portuguese colony that became Angola did not have its present borders until the early 20th century because of resistance by groups such as the Cuamato, the Kwanyama and the Mbunda. After a protracted anti-colonial struggle, independence was achieved in 1975 as the Marxist–Leninist People's Republic of Angola, a one-party state supported by the Soviet Union and Cuba. The civil war between the ruling People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) and the insurgent anti-communist National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), supported by the United States and apartheid South Africa, lasted until 2002. The sovereign state has since become a relatively stable unitary, presidential constitutional republic. Angola has vast mineral and petroleum reserves, and its economy is among the fastest-growing in the world, especially since the end of the civil war; however, the standard of living remains low for most of the population, and life expectancy in Angola is among the lowest in the world, while infant mortality is among the highest. Angola's economic growth is highly uneven, with most of the nation's wealth concentrated in a disproportionately small sector of the population.Angola is a member state of the United Nations, OPEC, African Union, the Community of Portuguese Language Countries, and the Southern African Development Community. A highly multiethnic country, Angola's 25.8 million people span tribal groups, customs, and traditions. Angolan culture reflects centuries of Portuguese rule, in the predominance of the Portuguese language and of the Catholic Church.
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Rhodesia | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Rhodesia Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Rhodesia (, ) was an unrecognised state in southern Africa from 1965 to 1979, equivalent in territory to modern Zimbabwe. Rhodesia was the de facto successor state to the British colony of Southern Rhodesia, which had been self-governing since achieving responsible government in 1923. A landlocked nation, Rhodesia was bordered by South Africa to the south, Bechuanaland (later Botswana) to the southwest, Zambia to the northwest, and Mozambique (a Portuguese province until 1975) to the east. In the late 19th century, the territory north of the Transvaal was chartered to the British South Africa Company, led by Cecil Rhodes. Rhodes and his Pioneer Column marched north in 1890, acquiring a huge bloc of territory that the Company would rule until the early 1920s. In 1923, the Company's charter was revoked, and Southern Rhodesia attained self-government and established a legislature. Between 1953 and 1963, Southern Rhodesia was joined with Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland in the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. The decolonisation of Africa in the early 1960s alarmed a significant proportion of Rhodesia's white population. In an effort to delay the transition to black majority rule, Rhodesia's predominantly white government issued its own Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) from the United Kingdom on 11 November 1965. (The government of the United Kingdom supported Rhodesia's transition to a multi-racial democracy.) The UDI administration initially sought recognition as an autonomous realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, but reconstituted itself as a republic in 1970. The Rhodesian Bush War, which pitted the government against two African nationalist organisations, ZANU and ZAPU, intensified in the 1970s, prompting Rhodesian premier Ian Smith to concede to multiracial democracy in 1978. However, a provisional government subsequently headed by Smith and his moderate colleague Abel Muzorewa failed in appeasing international critics or halting the bloodshed. By December 1979, Muzorewa had replaced Smith as Prime Minister and secured an agreement with the militant nationalists, allowing Rhodesia to briefly revert to colonial status pending elections under a universal franchise. It finally achieved internationally recognised independence in April 1980 as the Republic of Zimbabwe. Rhodesia's largest cities were its capital, Salisbury, and Bulawayo. The white population, which grew to nearly 300,000, dominated the country's politics and economy, though they never made up more than eight percent of the total population. Rhodesia developed an economy largely dependent on agriculture, manufacturing, and mining. Its largest exports were chrome, tobacco, and steel. International sanctions put increasing pressure on the country as time went on. The Parliament of Rhodesia, which included the lower House of Assembly and later a Senate, was predominantly white, with minority of seats reserved for blacks. After 1970, the country used a semi-presidential system, with a President, Prime Minister, and cabinet.
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