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Processing Environmental Scientific Datasets - FME UC 2017
 
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The Australian Government’s Bioregional Assessment Programme provides transparent scientific information to better understand the potential impacts of coal seam gas and coal mining developments on water resources and water-dependent assets such as wetlands and groundwater bores. FME has been introduced into the Bioregional Assessments Information Platform (BAIP) to assist in the through put of a broad range of metadata and datasets regarding geology, hydrology, hydrogeology, ecology and modelling. This presentation will showcase what techniques were applied to better manage the spatial datasets.
Views: 61 FME Channel
Pilliga Farmers Protest CSG
 
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Go to http://facebook.com/protectingthepilliga for live updates on the community action to protect North West NSW. For more information on the impacts of coal seam gas in Australia see http://www.lockthegate.org.au/films Hundreds of farmers and community members step up the pressure against coal seam gas in the Pilliga and Narrabri. CC BY: ABC News, 28 February 2014
Views: 489 Jonathan Doig
Mercury and Rice in the California Delta: Lessons Linking Wetlands to Water to Wildlife
 
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Presenter: Lisamarie Windham-Myers, USGS Research Ecologist, National Research Program - Wetlands are hotspots for mercury methylation and export of methylmercury to aquatic foodwebs. Rice is the most abundant wetland type in California and globally in temperate and tropical latitudes. - Physical, chemical and biological Hg transformations are temporally pulsed in agricultural wetlands, due largely to seasonal water management practices. - Monitoring methylmercury at the right time and location is essential to managing and projecting future exposure for wildlife and humans.
Views: 6945 USGS
Mining & the Environment: Sustainable or Responsible? by Dr. Gavin Mudd
 
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You can access Dr. Mudd's Power Point presentation here--http://ace.aua.am/files/2016/08/AUA-Mining-v-Environment-v-Susty-or-Resp.pdf About the Talk: Modern mining is a truly global industry, supplying ever more minerals and metals to meet growing global demand - but at what environmental and social costs? This presentation will cover the main issues facing modern mining - declining ore grades, bigger mines, giant open cut and underground mines, more tailings and waste rock, more energy-water-pollution issues, greater regulatory, corporate and financial scrutiny, and all the same time as communities are more aware of mining issues. Showing unique data sets and case studies, this talk will demonstrate that modern mining is far from running out of mineral resources but is clearly facing greater environmental risks. Solutions include better regulation, corporate reporting and accountability, as well as informed communities - thereby ensuring a responsible mining sector is contributing to sustainable development. About the Speaker: Dr. Gavin Mudd is a renowned global expert on the environmental sustainability of modern mining, and brings together a unique set of multi-disciplinary skills and knowledge to explore the challenges that the modern mining industry, governments and communities are collectively facing. His 20 years of research work have examined the environmental impacts to surface water and groundwater, waste rock and tailings management, acid mine drainage, rehabilitation, mineral resources, and the sustainability metrics of mining - and this has included detailed studies of almost all sectors of the global mining industry, such as gold, uranium, coal, gas, copper, nickel, platinum group elements, rare earths, mineral sands. To date he has presented or published more than 200 journal, conference and technical papers or reports (nearly two thirds of which are peer-reviewed) - with his research differentiated by the integration of rich data sets, leading the way in quantifying the environmental and sustainability issues affecting modern mining. Dr. Mudd is recognised worldwide for his unique and independent expertise on mining, and is currently Head of Environmental Engineering at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, where he has collaborated closely with Dr. Simon Jowitt in recent years on the geological side underpinning the environmental issues facing modern mining.
Views: 182 AUA ACE
America—and the Planet—Doesn’t Need This Dirty Oil
 
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More than two million barrels of tar sands oil come into the United States daily, and there are over 400 tar sands oil spills yearly. Yet the Canadian oil industry wants to double the amount of tar sands coming into the country. Not only is tar sands extremely difficult to clean up—it sinks in water—it also creates a dangerous byproduct that causes health-harming pollution. It’s time to stop tar sands and move toward clean, renewable energy. Take Action: http://on.nrdc.org/2xgMoIV
Views: 929 NRDCflix
Trump admin. proposes rollback of water rules
 
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(11 Dec 2018) RESTRICTION SUMMARY: AP CLIENTS ONLY ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington - 11 December 2018 1. Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James sign document 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Wheeler, Acting EPA Administrator: "When President Trump took office he immediately began a process to remove and replace undue regulatory burdens that stifle American innovation and economic development. At the top of the list was the Obama administration's 2015 waters of the United States definition. Today EPA and the Army Corps are proposing a new definition of waters in the United States that puts an end to the previous administration's power grab."\ 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Wheeler, Acting EPA Administrator: "When the Obama EPA put forward their 2015 definition they claimed it was in the best interest of water quality. But it is really about power, power in the hands of the federal government over farmers, developers and landowners." 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Wheeler, Acting EPA Administrator: "In line with President Trump's February 2017 executive order, our proposal would replace the 2015 definition with one that respects the rule of law and the primary role of the states in managing their land and water resources. It would end years of uncertainty over where federal jurisdiction begins and ends. For the first time, we are clearly defining the difference between federally protected wetlands and state protected wetlands." 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ryan Zinke, Interior Secretary: "So just like sage grouse doesn't remove any protections. What it does it puts the management decisions back where they should be. The people that work the land, that hunt, that own the land and the communities that we all share our greatest bounty." STORYLINE: The Trump administration proposed withdrawing federal protections for countless waterways and wetlands across the country Tuesday, making good on President Donald Trump's campaign pledge to weaken landmark Obama-era water rules long opposed by some developers, farmers and oil, gas, and mining executives. The Environmental Protection Agency's acting administrator said the proposed rule would reverse what he called the federal government's usurping of the rights of private landowners and local governments. The water-rule revision "restores the rule of law and the primary role of states in managing their water resources," Andrew Wheeler told reporters before the rule was officially released at a ceremony at EPA headquarters. Environmental groups said the Trump administration proposal would have a sweeping impact on how the country safeguards the nation's waterways, scaling back not just a 2015 Obama administration interpretation of federal jurisdiction, but how federal agencies enforce the 1972 Clean Water Act. The changes would affect what waterways and wetlands fall under jurisdiction of the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Trump administration would remove federal protections for wetlands nationally unless they are connected to another federally protected waterway, and for streams, creeks, washes and ditches that run only during rains or snow melt. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said the proposal "doesn't remove any protection." "It puts the decision back where it should be, the people that work the land, that hunt, that own the land," Zinke said. Wheeler said there was no firm data on what percentage of waterways would lose protections. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e2f368bbe67a41930467e39ac5c6713a
Views: 143 AP Archive
"Reef at Risk" in Gladstone
 
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Gladstone, 7th March 2012: Greenpeace activists have painted the message "Reef in Danger" on the side of a coal ship - the Panamanian-flagged Chou Shan- berthed at Gladstone RG Tanna Coal Terminal, as a United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) team arrive to inspect the harbour. The UNESCO mission is in Australia due to concerns about the impacts of the Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) industry's expansion in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Site. Last week Greenpeace released a report showing that massive coal mining expansion planned in Central Queensland's Galilee Basin would result in six times more coal ships moving through the Great Barrier Reef and enough material being dredged to fill the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) 67 times. Become a reef defender: https://www.greenpeace.org.au/secure/petition/climate_gbr/
Environmental Impact of Oil Industry
 
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Brad Davis talks about his experiences as an oil and gas professional. He mentions that while drilling for oil he and his company make sure to leave as small of an ecological footprint as possible. Don Worrell also speaks about his opinion about buying local versus far away food.
Views: 69 Niki Cade
Equilibrium Future Solutions- Rehydrating the Landscape Pt 4 & The Dangers of CSG
 
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Continuation of previous talk whilst also highlighting the dangers of Coal Seam Gas Mining. Ian discusses in very simple terms how the decision to frack and take gas from the ground is having dramatic impacts on our water, both underground and above the ground. Also discussed the issue of salinity, and the effects of long term mining. For more info : www.equilibrium.net.au
Views: 33 Allison Duffy
Constructed Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment: A Non-Technical Overview
 
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This presentation was recorded at the Green Lunch, Auburn University, on August 26, 2009. James Lowery is a board member of Alabama Rivers Alliance and Alabama Water Watch Association.
Views: 16914 Auburn University
Mexico coal mines prove lucrative for drug barons
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Mexico's drug gangs appear to be investing in coal mines. The business boosts their income, and helps them launder the money they get from trafficking. But it also means harsh conditions for the miners. Al Jazeera Adam Raney reports from Coahuila. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 1875 Al Jazeera English
Draining the Lifeblood - Galilee Basin at Risk
 
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Tom Crothers, former Manager of Planning and Water Allocation in the Queensland Govt, lifts the lid on the groundwater impacts of proposed coal mining on the Galilee Basin. Cattle farmer John Graham shares his concerns. Music performed by Paul Robert Burton and Luke Vassella. Shot and edited by David Lowe. Produced by Carmel Flint. For more information visit: http://www.lockthegate.org.au/draining_the_lifeblood
10 Worst Jobs In The History Of Humanity
 
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Gathering leeches, collecting corpses and... playing World of Warcraft? These are the 10 worst jobs ever. When you see what these people have had to do to make ends meet, you might feel a little better about your job. Click to Subscribe.. http://bit.ly/WTVC4x FAQ's: What editing software do we use?: http://amzn.to/2p8Y4G2 What mic do we use for our voice overs?: http://amzn.to/2pbWBzr What camera do we use to film?: http://amzn.to/2pbMv1A What computer do we edit on?: http://amzn.to/2p951qu Check out the best of Alltime10s - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLec1lxRhYOzt2qqqnFBIpUm63wr5yhLF6 Where else to find All Time 10s... Facebook: http://ow.ly/3FNFR Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FNMk
Views: 335913 Alltime10s
Trump Will Issue Executive Orders To Dismantle Obama’s ‘Climate Action Plan’
 
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Trump Breaking News Network -Trump Will Issue Executive Orders To Dismantle Obama’s ‘Climate Action Plan’ President Donald Trump will order the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to begin dismantling a regulation central to former President Barack Obama’s plan to fight global warming. A source briefed on the matter told The Washington Post one of the orders “will instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to begin rewriting the 2015 regulation that limits greenhouse-gas emissions from existing electric utilities” and order “the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to lift a moratorium on federal coal leasing.” Trump will issue a second order instructing the EPA and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to rewrite the “Waters of the U.S.” (WOTUS) rule that expanded federal control over rivers, streams and wetlands — even those on private property. Trump is expected to issue the orders in the next week. Dismantling EPA regulations could take months and is bound to draw legal challenges. Repealing the Department of the Interior’s coal moratorium, on the other hand, could take effect immediately. Previous media reports suggested Trump would issue executive orders dealing with Obama’s Climate Action Plan after the Senate confirmed Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head EPA. The Senate confirmed Pruitt Friday. Obama’s Climate Action Plan aims to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions 26 to 28 percent by 2025, and mainly relies on EPA’s Clean Power Plan regulation to get there. The CPP limits carbon dioxide emissions and is expected to force more coal plants to prematurely shut down. Trump’s withdrawal of the CPP, along with lifting Obama’s moratorium on new federal coal leases, marks the next step in fulfilling his campaign promise to lift the regulatory burden off the coal industry. Trump recently signed legislation repealing the Obama administration’s Stream Protection Rule on coal mining. Congress voted to rescind the rule using the Congressional Review Act (CRA). “We’re bringing it back, and we’re bringing it back fast,” Trump said before signing the CRA. Rewriting the WOTUS rule is popular among coal companies, but also farmers and rural landowners who oppose expanded federal control over their property. WOTUS limits development and some farming activities. Withdrawing the CPP could mean Pruitt will replace it with a more narrow rule, but the former attorney general questioned whether or not EPA even had the tools under the Clean Air Act to regulate CO2 in a recent Wall Street Journal interview. Source: http://dailycaller.com/2017/02/20/trump-will-issue-executive-orders-to-dismantle-obamas-climate-action-plan/ http://trumpbreakingnewsnetwork.net Trump Breaking News Network - TBNN https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6KZ... https://youtu.be/rikfCI3aO9Y For the latest new about Donald Trump and his presidency. Stay tuned. Share and like. 'Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for 'fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use' Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Category News & Politics License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)
3. Determining mercury in oil and gas
 
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Part 3. Workshop Direct Mercury Analysis of a wide range of samples: Fast and Simple Mercury determination without reagents and sample preparation. In this workshop, Lumex Instruments’ experts discuss the advantages of atomic absorption spectroscopy with Zeeman background correction (ZAAS) for the analysis of mercury in soil, food, crude oil, naphtha, wastewater, sediments, coal, 30B sorbent traps, ores, ash, cosmetics, liquid fuel, and more. This method requires no sample preparation or mercury accumulation and can reduce analysis time, reagent consumption, and running costs for mercury determination in any complex liquid or solid by means of thermal decomposition (pyrolysis).
Pollution from Paper Factory in Laos
 
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WWT Consulting is working with industry and local communities to improve water quality. This video shows pollution from a factory on the That Luang Marsh, Laos, which will be treated using a new wetland treatment system.
Views: 4950 WWTConsulting
D.E.P. DON'T EXPECT PROTECTION.mov
 
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Activists meet with Florida DEP (Department of Environmental Protection) and express their refusal to be silenced by energy giants such as FPL who are pulling the political strings across the world.
Views: 839 sukidejong
Can We Reverse The Damage Done To Earth?
 
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Man-made climate change might be ruining the world around you, but luckily, scientists are working on several solutions. Watch More: How Does A Planet Die? ►►►► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZ2mPv7MCko Support Life Noggin on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/LifeNogginStudios?ty=h Follow Us! https://twitter.com/LifeNoggin https://facebook.com/LifeNoggin Click here to see more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/lifenoggin Life Noggin is a weekly animated educational series. Whether it's science, pop culture, history or art, we explore it all and have a ton of fun doing it. Life Noggin Team: Animation by Steven Lawson Director/Voice: http://lifenogg.in/patgraziosi Executive Producer: http://lifenogg.in/IanDokie Director of Marketing: http://lifenogg.in/JaredOban Head Writer: http://lifenogg.in/KayleeYuhas Sources: http://climate.nasa.gov/causes/ http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar4/syr/ar4_syr_spm.pdf http://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/24/ https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-detail-severe-future-impacts-of-climate-change/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19689973 http://climate.nasa.gov/causes/ https://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/ghg_report/ghg_methane.cfm https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases https://phys.org/news/2008-07-cow-backpacks-methane-gas.html http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/12/discovery-racing-extinction-methane-bags-timelapse https://www.springwise.com/methane-backpacks-capture-cow-farts-turn-green-fuel/ http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/coal-plant-in-india-has-found-a-way-to-turn-almost-all-co2-emissions-into-baking-powder/ https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jan/03/indian-firm-carbon-capture-breakthrough-carbonclean https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/ccs/ http://www.iea.org/topics/ccs/ http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/icelandic-project-converts-carbon-dioxide-to-stone-in-world-first/ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tech-climate-change_us_566f2719e4b0fccee16f7215 http://www.nationalgeographic.com/climate-change/how-to-fix-it/businesses.html https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/10-solutions-for-climate-change/
Views: 798781 Life Noggin
My Children Don't Want a Coal Plant
 
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Santee Cooper, South Carolina's state owned utility is planning to build a 1320 MW coal fired power plant on the banks of the Great Pee Dee River in southern Florence County. This will be the states 13th coal plant and it will emit every year over 10 million tons of CO2, the primary greenhouse gas, 3.5 thousand tons of smog causing nitrous oxide, 7.5 thousand tons of sulfur dioxide or toxic soot, 93 pounds of mercury that contaminates fish and the people that eat them and over 900 tons of particulate matter, tiny particles that cause lung and heart disease and even death. The proposed plant will use 10 thousand tons of coal every day, much of it coming from decapitated Appalachian Mountains. We want to protect surrounding habitats and communities of the Great Pee Dee River by protesting this old technology through the Coastal Conservation League. This film has been submitted to the Second Annual Green Fair for inclusion in their "Music that Matters" contest with a children's chorus to sing along. Mary Edna wrote the lyrics and music, and performed the song at her studio with Dana Downs at the initial Delete Apathy event. Mary Edna Fraser flew and photographed the Great Pee Dee River to make this film, starting at the mouth near Georgetown, and past Bostick Landing, which is already cleared for the coal plant with some drainage pools in place. Southwings, a conservation organization that uses volunteer pilots and small aircraft to protect the natural resources and ecosystems of the Southeast, sponsored the flight. Along the way, there are abundant wetlands, small towns, abandoned rice fields, and all kinds of development, from marsh shacks to subdivisions, that would be polluted by the intrusion of a coal plant. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resource, in their Great Pee Dee Scenic River project, reports: The Great Pee Dee River is mostly bordered by floodplain forest. As a high quality wildlife habitat, it supports 120 species of fish, at least 25 rare plant species, several endangered and threatened species (including the American alligator, red-cockaded woodpecker, bald eagle and swallow-tailed kite), 17 species of duck (all but the wood duck are migratory visitors), a number of wading birds and fur bearing species, and typical South Carolina game species, such as white tail deer and turkey. Sandy shores and bars turn to tidal swamps below confluence with the Little Pee Dee River. Freshwater tidal marshes that were once the basis for antebellum rice plantations begin to displace the tidal swamp forest downriver. The river is a dynamic, producing blackwater lake-like channels cut off from the rich brown flowing river. The fishing opportunities in the Great Pee Dee River and its connected lakes include largemouth bass, bluegill and other sunfish, crappie perch and catfish. The lower portion of the river also includes several saltwater species. A mercury advisory is in effect for largemouth bass and bowfin caught in the Great Pee Dee.
Views: 3627 MaryEdnaFraser
Ray Brown (pt 2) Regional coexistence of agriculture and the coal seam gas sector
 
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Ray Brown (Western Downs Regional Council) presents on 'Coexistence of agriculture and the coal seam gas sector -- a regional perspective' in the Agriculture and coal seam gas development -- pathways to coexistence session at Outlook 2012, March 7. The full presentation is available online: http://www.daff.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/2135630/Ray-Brown.pdf
Views: 129 ABARES Outlook 2012
Larissa Waters delivers compelling speech against Abbot Point coal port
 
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"Our campaign represents the growing frustration that so many Australians feel, that the interest of big business and the mining companies is continually being put first by governments that are suppose to represent citizens. Our fight for the Great Barrier Reef is a rallying point for everyone with a shared understanding that the profits of foreign owned coal and gas companies are a poor trade for the irreparable destruction of something so precious and unique that it is integral to our national identity".
Yelawolf - American You (Official Music Video)
 
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Pre-order the album Love Story now On iTunes: http://smarturl.it/YelaLoveStory Google Play: http://smarturl.it/YelaLoveStoryGP Amazon MP3: http://smarturl.it/YelaLoveStoryAmz Sign up for updates: http://smarturl.it/Yelawolf.News Best of Yelawolf: https://goo.gl/vy7NZQ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/ynkVDL #Yelawolf #AmericanYou #Vevo #HipHop #OfficialMusicVideo
Views: 36781707 YelawolfVEVO
Methane Gas or Hydrocarbon/Background Information About Natural gas and it's Effects of Environment
 
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Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly including varying amounts of other higher alkanes, and sometimes a small percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, hydrogen sulfide, or helium.It is formed when layers of decomposing plant and animal matter are exposed to intense heat and pressure under the surface of the Earth over millions of years. The energy that the plants originally obtained from the sun is stored in the form of chemical bonds in the gas. Natural gas is a fossil fuel used as a source of energy for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. It is a non-renewable resource. Natural gas is found in deep underground rock formations or associated with other hydrocarbon reservoirs in coal beds and as methane clathrates. Petroleum is another resource and fossil fuel found in close proximity to and with natural gas. Most natural gas was created over time by two mechanisms: biogenic and thermogenic. Biogenic gas is created by methanogenic organisms in marshes, bogs, landfills, and shallow sediments. Deeper in the earth, at greater temperature and pressure, thermogenic gas is created from buried organic material. When gas is associated with petroleum production it may be considered a byproduct and be burnt as flare gas. The World Bank estimates that over 150 cubic kilometers of natural gas are flared or vented annually. Before natural gas can be used as a fuel, most, but not all, must be processed to remove impurities, including water, to meet the specifications of marketable natural gas. The by-products of this processing include: ethane, propane, butanes, pentanes, and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulfide (which may be converted into pure sulfur), carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sometimes helium and nitrogen. methane is allowed to leak into the air before being used—from a leaky pipe, for instance—it absorbs the sun’s heat, warming the atmosphere. For this reason, it’s considered a greenhouse gas, like carbon dioxide.
Views: 1107 SeeQueen
Solar stops fracking &  creates millions of JOBS!
 
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Follow the lead of Japan. Require PG&E to pay home owners $0.49 kWh for solar! Yes. Japan is going 100% solar. I know! I know! Many people say, "Oh, solar is too little, too late and too weak to ever power any city. But 22 cities in Germany are now 100% solar, wind, berm & hydro. Germany is going 100% solar. Germany has banned Fracking. In February 2013, the government of Chancellor Angela Merkel announced draft regulations that would allow for the exploitation of shale gas deposits, with the exception only of wetland areas that make up over 10% of German territory. . However these plans immediately drew massive critique both from opposition parties and elements of Merkel's own CDU, as well as from major NGOs, large parts of the press and the general public. Within less than a month, the original plan was put on ice for the foreseeable future and a moratorium was declared. Ever since shale gas fracking has been banned in Germany and the stance of the newly formed Grand Coalition government expressed in the coalition treaty is that unconventional gas exploration will not be pursued in the country under this government. Instead, Germany will build millions of new solar powered homes. Here is an excerpt from the coalition contract:[ Fracking According to available studies on its environmental relevance, the fracking technology in unconventional natural gas production - particularly in shale gas production - is a technology with enormous potential risks. The effects on humans, nature and the environment are scientifically not yet sufficiently clarified. Drinking water and health have absolute priority for us. We reject the use of environmentally toxic substances in the application of fracking technology for exploration and extraction of unconventional natural gas deposits. A request for approval can only be decided upon when the necessary data basis for evaluation exists and is clarified beyond doubt that any adverse change in water quality can be ruled out The disposal of flowback from fracking operations with the use environmentally toxic chemicals in injection wells is currently not justifiable due to lack of knowledge of the risks involved. The Coalition will work - with the involvement of cities & states and science - in a collaborative process with the companies. The industry will need to explain the specific objectives of their explorations campaigns which specific findings to eliminate gaps in knowledge and to provide a sufficient basis for possible subsequent steps. This should be done in a transparent process. In a dialogue with all stakeholders - under the auspices of cities & the scientific community - research results will be shared and discussed. A mandatory EIA and public participation will be required for the licensing of exploration and production of natural gas from unconventional deposits. Although German laws prohibit hydraulic fracturing in designated water preserves, fracking operations generally need be authorized by the city government, which has publicly declared a moratorium. Hear all Solar, see all Solar, post all Solar.
Views: 99 paul8kangas
How to Generate Passive Income from Vacant Land with Wind Energy (What No One Is Talking About)
 
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Show Notes: https://retipster.com/37 Learn other ways to make passive income from land: https://youtu.be/oTnf8nymjQg Learn more about Alcen Renewable here: http://www.alcenrenewable.com What Arnold things about coal energy: https://youtu.be/_Ise8Mvzub4 Over the past year, I've become a lot more interested in finding legitimate ways to generate sources of truly passive income from vacant land. Now, to the average real estate investor, the words "cash flow" and "vacant land" do NOT go together, but if you know where to look and how to find these kinds of properties, there are actually a ton of opportunities out there. There are actually a lot of ways to do it, and one such way is to invest in own land that is leased out to the owner of a wind farm development. Essentially, the landowner can earn revenue from the lease (which typically lasts for 35 years or longer) and through a small percentage of the royalties from the energy that is generated and sent into the power grid. Depending on the size of the wind farm project, it's not uncommon for these leases and royalties to produce anywhere from $20,000 - $50,000 for the landowner. And the landowner doesn't have to do anything. They simply own the dirt and collect the money each year. Sounds pretty simple, right? Well, there's A LOT more to the story, and in this episode - I talk with Tao Kong (COO of Alcen Renewable) and we uncover a lot of the details behind how wind energy leases work, what kinds of properties make the most sense for this type of development, what markets make the most sense to start looking in (and which ones to avoid), and a lot more. This was one of the most interesting conversations I've had in a long time, and if you have any interest in passive income, land investing or renewable energy, I think you'll enjoy it too.
Views: 940 REtipster
Plundering Tibet
 
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Directed by: Michael Buckley. A short documentary about the dire consequences of China’s ruthless mining in Tibet. As a Canadian filmmaker, the narrator has a personal take on this because of the involvement of Canadian companies in mining in Tibet—and the railway to Lhasa. Following the arrival of the train in Tibet in 2006, large-scale mining of lithium, gold, copper, lead, crude oil, natural gas and other resources is under way to feed China’s voracious industrial sector. None of this benefits Tibetans. In fact, mining pollutes drinking water, kills the livestock, and degrades the grasslands on which Tibetan nomads depend. A disaster of Biblical proportions is unfolding in Tibet—so big you can see it happening on Google Earth—the mines, the pollution, the environmental damage. The environmental impact has the potential to go far beyond Tibet because of rivers that run downstream to Asian nations. Chinese engineers are heavily damming Tibet’s mighty rivers to supply pow er for mining operations—and this will immediately impact the nations downstream. Using Google Earth flyovers, the film is able to show what is happening on the ground in Tibet, hidden from view . It would be next-to-impossible to visit these mining sites in person to get film, due to tight security in remote locations.
Views: 80 CMS VATAVARAN
We can't let Abbot Point become another Gladstone
 
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Greenpeace spoke with Gladstone residents about the effects that industrial development in recent years has had on their lives and livelihoods. Queensland community campaigner Louise Matthiesson visited Gladstone Harbour and Curtis Island. Curtis Island is World Heritage listed, yet was approved by the Australian Government on 12 December 2013 to be the site of a fourth gas export terminal. Music thanks to Claire Deak.
Alberta Regulator Approves Jackpine Mine Expansion Despite "Irreversible" Environmental Impacts
 
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Indigenous activists and supporters embark on 4th annual Healing Walk, raise awareness on tar sands effects See more videos at: http://therealnews.com
Views: 1568 The Real News Network
No Name Creek - Pollution.wmv
 
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Pollution From Recent Coal and Gas Exploration ?? NoName Creek was running clear only a few days before, now its running black, with an oily scum in parts, There has been recent coal and gas exploration wells drilled nearby, with a cluster of wells surrounding the headwaters of NoName Creek, which flows into Mammy Johnstons River, then into The Karuah and finally Port Stevens, a marine haven just north of Newcastle.
Views: 304 EnviroTube1
Global Mining Waste Management
 
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Bharat Book Bureau provides the report, on "Global Mining Waste Management 2016-2020”. https://www.bharatbook.com/oil-gas-market-research-reports-782250/global-mining-waste-management.html Mining operations are dependent on several factors that pertain to the accurate estimation regarding the positioning and recovery of the reserves.
Views: 104 Bharat Book
Senator Larissa Waters calls Greg Hunt to revoke Abbot Point coal port approval.
 
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Larissa Waters invites Greg Hunt to revoke his approval for the Abbot Point coal port, a move that was cautioned against by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, will allow 5 million tonnes of sediment to be dumped offshore and cause long term irreversible harm to a great national icon.
Views: 1211 The Australian Greens
Wetlands and Their Role in the Ecosystem
 
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Dr. Christine Whitcraft of CSULB’s Biological Sciences identifies the important functions that wetlands and associated habitats perform in the overall scheme of our natural world.
Views: 214 Beach TV CSULB
Conservation & the Bureau of Land Management | Pew & This American Land (Long Version)
 
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The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) oversees 246 million acres of the nation’s public land—from ecologically diverse southwestern deserts, to panoramic red rock country, to the sage-steppe, to Alaska’s boreal forest. Originally, the intent was to develop these lands for oil, gas, and mining, as well as use them for their range land resources. In recent decades, however, there has been an evolution in response to public opinion. Hunters, fishermen, hikers, campers, and more outdoor enthusiasts all enjoy these public lands. As a result, the BLM is placing more emphasis on conservation. More video and facts on the Pew Charitable Trusts’ America’s Western Lands project: http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/americas-western-lands
Views: 626 Pew
William Schlesinger - "New Perspectives on Biogeochemical Cycles"
 
01:04:43
"New Perspectives on Biogeochemical Cycles and Human Impacts On Our Planet" William H. Schlesinger, President of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. introduced by Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies, and PI of the NSF IGERT Program in Polar Environmental Change. Start: 4pm End: 5:30pm Location: Life Sciences Center, Room 100 Details: Dr. Schlesinger will provide some new ways of examining global biogeochemical cycles and assessing human impact on the cycles of important biogeochemical elements. He will focus on the ongoing, major impact to the cycles of carbon and nitrogen, and what we have learned by large-scale long-term field experiments. Dr. Schlesinger was among the first to quantify the amount of carbon held in soil organic matter globally, providing subsequent estimates of the role of soils and human impacts on forest and soils in global climate change. Sponsored by IGERT Dialogues in Polar Science, Engineering, and Society Seminar Series and the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center.
Views: 4978 Dartmouth
Clean Up Coal Ash
 
02:06
https://secure.earthjustice.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1747 Click above to take action to prevent the coal industry and their allies in Congress from weakening or eliminating the coal ash safeguards that Americans fought so hard for.
Views: 2425 Earthjustice
Building Regional Food Systems Part 2: Creating Networks and Measuring Impacts
 
01:13:09
Richard Pirog, Associate Director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University, will present on two of the Leopold Centers major projects: Creating Networks: Value Chain Partnerships is an Iowa-based network of food and agriculture working groups which brings together a diverse ensemble of producers, processors, and private, non-profit, and government organizations across a variety of market-driven food and agriculture issues. Currently supporting six state-wide and regional working groups, the working groups operate using a community of practice framework, which has been pivotal to their success. Learn about the Value Chain Partnerships, and how the community of practice framework has been so successful in bridging the differences between such a diverse group of participants to deliver benefits to farmers and food business networks and communities. Measuring Impacts: A just-released analysis from the Leopold Center* and analyzed by ISU researcher Dave Swenson estimated potential state and regional economic values associated with increased production of fresh fruit and vegetables in a six-state area of the Upper Midwest. Both scenarios in the study showed that reasonable increases in fruit and vegetable production would significantly increase the number of jobs at the farm and retail level compared to current agricultural land use. Youll hear some details of the findings, as well as the methods used to determine impacts. * in collaboration with regional partners who participated in the Wallace Centers Upper Midwest Regional Lead Team
Climate Change and Health
 
54:48
Google Tech Talks October 30, 2006 Paul Epstein ABSTRACT Climate change has multiple direct and indirect consequences for human health. Heat waves affect health directly and are projected to take an increasing toll in developed and underdeveloped nations. The 2003 summer heatwave in Europe -- an event six standard deviations from the mean -- led to 21-35,000 excess deaths in five nations, extensive wildfires, crop failures, nuclear plant shutdowns and melted 10% of the Alpine glacial mass. This event and Hurricane Katrina in 2005 demonstrate that climate change and its impacts may be surprisingly non-linear. Credits: Speaker:Paul Epstein
Views: 17478 Google
Advancing Environmental Justice In and Out of the Classroom - Excerpts
 
14:02
The Duke Human Rights [email protected] is examining what it means to study human rights at the university level in a new project titled RightsConnect. RightsConnect hosts a series of lectures and workshops on human rights teaching and practice, with noted outside faculty and practitioners who face real world challenges to rights campaigns. This talk focuses on environmental health and justice, centering on air pollution's increased effects upon races and classes already vulnerable to other health issues due to disparities. Rachel Morello-Frosch is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Berkeley working in the Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management. Her work focuses on these community-based health issues and the policy-making around these issues.
5 Trump policies that will make future flooding worse
 
08:03
President Donald Trump went to North and South Carolina on Wednesday to tout his administration’s response to Hurricane Florence, whose epic downpour killed at least 37 people, swamped thousands of homes and roadways, stranded a nuclear power plant and unleashed toxic pollution from coal-ash pits and hog-waste ponds. “There will be nothing left undone,” Trump told federal and state officials in North Carolina before heading out to tour the storm damage. “You will have everything you need." Here’s what he didn’t talk about: His administration’s environmental policies are likely to worsen the devastation from future disasters like Florence. From gutting climate rules to letting developers fill in more water-absorbing wetlands, the administration’s push to relax Obama-era regulations threatens to reverse years of federal efforts to reduce the property damage, contamination and human suffering that extreme rainfall and surging seas cause. “The Obama administration took steps in the right direction and now we’re going backwards,” said Geoff Gisler with the Southern Environmental Law Center. "If the federal government doesn’t take action and doesn’t move in the right direction, we will not only be equally unprepared the next time a major storm hits one of our states, we’ll likely be less prepared." The White House did not respond to requests for comment. Trump’s policies have had little real-world effect so far — they haven’t even come into force yet in much of the country, and former President Barack Obama’s efforts were still a work in progress when he left office. But these are five examples of how the regulatory rollback will matter in the coming years and decades: Obama directed federal agencies in 2015 to stop putting their money into construction in flood-prone areas, requiring that funding for projects like new veterans’ hospitals, schools and highways go to less low-lying places or that the projects be elevated. But the new requirements drew the ire of business and real estate interests, who feared they could stanch the flow of federal cash to their projects. And last year, Trump revoked it — shortly before Hurricane Harvey inflicted a major flooding disaster on the Houston area with as much as 60 inches of rainfall. A Trump White House adviser later mused that the administration was considering issuing its own flood standards “to build back better, faster and stronger.” But to date, it has not. The 2015 order “anticipated exactly the sorts of flooding that the nation has experienced,” said Samantha Medlock, a former senior Obama White House adviser on flood policy. She added: “Many states and local governments no longer rely solely on outdated flood maps but instead have integrated the latest science and adopted higher standards to reduce risks of loss of life and property in floods. It is past time for the federal government to follow their lead." Wetlands act as nature’s sponges, soaking up flood waters and filtering pollution before slowly releasing it downstream. But the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that more than 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands in the U.S. are lost every year, often filled in to build parking lots, strip malls and subdivisions. In Houston, unchecked development that decimated the region’s prairie wetlands made Hurricane Harvey’s flooding far worse. Harris County lost 30 percent of its wetlands between 1992 and 2010, according to research by Texas A and M University. Altogether, the researchers found that the Houston area lost roughly 4 billion gallons’ worth of lost flood retention through destroyed wetlands. Now the Trump administration is in the process of unwinding federal protections for a broad swath of the country’s wetlands. A rule that the Environmental Protection Agency proposed last summer would revoke a major 2015 Obama administration regulation that had been aimed at protecting headwater streams and wetlands. Those include specific types of wetlands that are common in the Carolinas, which researchers have found play a key role in regulating flooding in the Lower Neuse River basin, where much of Florence’s flooding occurred. The Obama-era rule has drawn criticism from a broad range of industries, including oil, gas, mining, farming and development, that argue it is a vast federal overreach. Trump has ordered EPA to replace it with a much narrower regulation that is expected to restrict federal protections that limit development and pollution to
2014 Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Awards Presentation Video
 
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2014 Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Awards Presentation Video
Views: 2442 OSMRE
Water
 
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Desert Liberation Front visits bores that are taking water from the Great Artesian Basin to be used by Western Mining Corporation. Uncle Kevin Buzzacott from the local Arabunna people talks to a worker about uranium mining.
Views: 116 SKATVaccessnews
WGM: Silly Vegan Dancing- Crazy Kid!
 
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Did you know that all the grains used to feed the livestock could feed a population of 8 billion people, and could solve the world's starvation problem? Lowering meat consumption or going vegetarian/vegan could solve so many health problems we have in this country, especially the obesity epidemic. Did you also know that the San Joaquin Valley ranks as one of the most polluted areas in the whole country not only due to the major freeways/highways that run through it, but also do to the methane gas the many cows release when they fart? Pretty gross if you ask me. From all the knowledge I have gained thus far from my formal education and from other very knowledgeable educated people in the health care industry, I am happy that I am a vegetarian not only for health benefits but for the beneficence of myself and the future populations of this world. Knowledge is power. Do research. Talk to people. Read a book. Many of the increases in diseases in this country are mainly due to the food that we consume. Chronic diseases begin formatting in your early 20's, many people wont see the effects of their choices till later on in life. As for my self, I plan on taking care of my body. The choice is yours. Read labels of processed foods you eat that come in packages. Most of the chemical preservatives and artificial ingredients Ive made in my chemistry labs (before studying nursing I was a Chemistry major). Boy have those chemistry classes opened my eyes... -Claudia CGB Galan ♥ ♥ ♥ Methane and Vegetarianism "By far the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gas is methane, and the number one source of methane worldwide is animal agriculture. Methane is responsible for nearly as much global warming as all other non-CO2 greenhouse gases put together. Methane is 21 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than CO2. While atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have risen by about 31% since pre-industrial times, methane concentrations have more than doubled. Whereas human sources of CO2 amount to just 3% of natural emissions, human sources produce one and a half times as much methane as all natural sources. In fact, the effect of our methane emissions may be compounded as methane-induced warming in turn stimulates microbial decay of organic matter in wetlands—the primary natural source of methane. With methane emissions causing nearly half of the planet's human-induced warming, methane reduction must be a priority. Methane is produced by a number of sources, including coal mining and landfills—but the number one source worldwide is animal agriculture. Animal agriculture produces more than 100 million tons of methane a year. And this source is on the rise: global meat consumption has increased fivefold in the past fifty years, and shows little sign of abating. About 85% of this methane is produced in the digestive processes of livestock, and while a single cow releases a relatively small amount of methane, the collective effect on the environment of the hundreds of millions of livestock animals worldwide is enormous. An additional 15% of animal agricultural methane emissions are released from the massive "lagoons" used to store untreated farm animal waste, and already a target of environmentalists' for their role as the number one source of water pollution in the U.S. The conclusion is simple: arguably the best way to reduce global warming in our lifetimes is to reduce or eliminate our consumption of animal products. Simply by going vegetarian (or, strictly speaking, vegan), , , we can eliminate one of the major sources of emissions of methane, the greenhouse gas responsible for almost half of the global warming impacting the planet today." http://www.earthsave.org/globalwarming.htm^^
Views: 186 Rene Rosales-Gomez
Cumulative Impacts
 
06:03
Views: 466 JaxStrong
WGM: Getting ripped with RG, Kiara's Debut Raw Vegan
 
32:34
Did you know that all the grains used to feed the livestock could feed a population of 8 billion people, and could solve the world's starvation problem? Lowering meat consumption or going vegetarian/vegan could solve so many health problems we have in this country, especially the obesity epidemic. Did you also know that the San Joaquin Valley ranks as one of the most polluted areas in the whole country not only due to the major freeways/highways that run through it, but also do to the methane gas the many cows release when they fart? Pretty gross if you ask me. From all the knowledge I have gained thus far from my formal education and from other very knowledgeable educated people in the health care industry, I am happy that I am a vegetarian not only for health benefits but for the beneficence of myself and the future populations of this world. Knowledge is power. Do research. Talk to people. Read a book. Many of the increases in diseases in this country are mainly due to the food that we consume. Chronic diseases begin formatting in your early 20's, many people wont see the effects of their choices till later on in life. As for my self, I plan on taking care of my body. The choice is yours. Read labels of processed foods you eat that come in packages. Most of the chemical preservatives and artificial ingredients Ive made in my chemistry labs (before studying nursing I was a Chemistry major). Boy have those chemistry classes opened my eyes... -Claudia CGB Galan ♥ ♥ ♥ Methane and Vegetarianism "By far the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gas is methane, and the number one source of methane worldwide is animal agriculture. Methane is responsible for nearly as much global warming as all other non-CO2 greenhouse gases put together. Methane is 21 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than CO2. While atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have risen by about 31% since pre-industrial times, methane concentrations have more than doubled. Whereas human sources of CO2 amount to just 3% of natural emissions, human sources produce one and a half times as much methane as all natural sources. In fact, the effect of our methane emissions may be compounded as methane-induced warming in turn stimulates microbial decay of organic matter in wetlands—the primary natural source of methane. With methane emissions causing nearly half of the planet's human-induced warming, methane reduction must be a priority. Methane is produced by a number of sources, including coal mining and landfills—but the number one source worldwide is animal agriculture. Animal agriculture produces more than 100 million tons of methane a year. And this source is on the rise: global meat consumption has increased fivefold in the past fifty years, and shows little sign of abating. About 85% of this methane is produced in the digestive processes of livestock, and while a single cow releases a relatively small amount of methane, the collective effect on the environment of the hundreds of millions of livestock animals worldwide is enormous. An additional 15% of animal agricultural methane emissions are released from the massive "lagoons" used to store untreated farm animal waste, and already a target of environmentalists' for their role as the number one source of water pollution in the U.S. The conclusion is simple: arguably the best way to reduce global warming in our lifetimes is to reduce or eliminate our consumption of animal products. Simply by going vegetarian (or, strictly speaking, vegan), , , we can eliminate one of the major sources of emissions of methane, the greenhouse gas responsible for almost half of the global warming impacting the planet today." http://www.earthsave.org/globalwarming.htm^^
Views: 215 Rene Rosales-Gomez
BIKE CAM  FRIENDSHIP FOUNTAIN JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA  GO PRO
 
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BIKE CAM SOUTHBANK RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA ALONG THE ST JOHNS RIVER VIDEO WAS SHOT WITH THE GO PRO CAMERA (TM) THIS IS BEING SPONSORED BY ALL PRO GAS INSTALLERS 904-993-3433 ALL VIDEOS ARE SPONSORED BY ALL PRO NATURAL GAS SERVICES ALL PRO LP GAS SERVICES 904-993-3433 Natural gas is a fossil fuel formed when layers of buried plants and animals are exposed to intense heat and pressure over thousands of years. The energy that the plants originally obtained from the sun is stored in the form of carbon in natural gas. Natural gas is a nonrenewable resource because it cannot be replenished on a human time frame. Natural gas is a hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in deep underground rock formations or associated with other hydrocarbon reservoirs in coal beds and as methane clathrates. Petroleum is also another resource found in proximity to and with natural gas. Most natural gas was created over time by two mechanisms: biogenic and thermogenic. Biogenic gas is created by methanogenic organisms in marshes, bogs, landfills, and shallow sediments. Deeper in the earth, at greater temperature and pressure, thermogenic gas is created from buried organic material. Before natural gas can be used as a fuel, it must undergo processing to remove impurities, including water, to meet the specifications of marketable natural gas. The by-products of processing include ethane, propane, butanes, pentanes, and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulfide (which may be converted into pure sulfur), carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sometimes helium and nitrogen. Natural gas is often informally referred to simply as gas, especially when compared to other energy sources such as oil or coal. However, it is not to be confused with gasoline, especially in North America, where the term gasoline is often shortened in colloquial usage to gas. Natural gas was used by the Chinese in about 500 B.C. They discovered the potential to transport gas seeping from the ground in crude pipelines of bamboo to where it was used to boil sea water. In the 19th century, natural gas was usually obtained as a by-product of producing oil, since the small, light gas carbon chains came out of solution as the extracted fluids underwent pressure reduction from the reservoir to the surface, similar to uncapping a bottle of soda where the carbon dioxide effervesces. Unwanted natural gas was a disposal problem in the active oil fields. If there was not a market for natural gas near the wellhead it was virtually valueless since it had to be piped to the end user. In the 19th century and early 20th century, such unwanted gas was usually burned off at oil fields. Today, unwanted gas (or stranded gas without a market) associated with oil extraction often is returned to the reservoir with 'injection' wells while awaiting a possible future market or to repressurize the formation, which can enhance extraction rates from other wells. In regions with a high natural gas demand (such as the US), pipelines are constructed when it is economically feasible to transport gas from a wellsite to an end consumer. Another possibility is to export natural gas as a liquid. Gas-to-liquids (GTL) is a developing technology that converts stranded natural gas into synthetic gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel through the Fischer-Tropsch process developed in Germany prior to World War II. Such fuel can be transported to users through conventional pipelines and tankers. Proponents claim that GTL burns cleaner than comparable petroleum fuels. Major international oil companies use sophisticated technology to produce GTL. A world-scale (140,000 barrels (22,000 m3) a day) GTL plant in Qatar went into production in 2011. Natural gas can be "associated" (found in oil fields), or "non-associated" (isolated in natural gas fields), and is also found in coal beds (as coalbed methane). It sometimes contains a significant amount of ethane, propane, butane, and pentane—heavier hydrocarbons removed for commercial use prior to the methane being sold as a consumer fuel or chemical plant feedstock. Non-hydrocarbons such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium (rarely), and hydrogen sulfide must also be removed before the natural gas can be transported.
Views: 92 L JR
Penn. Health Board Ordered To Ignore Fracking Health Complaints - 128
 
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Pennsylvania, the fifth most corrupt state, ordered it's health boards to ignore fracking related health complaints. Yet the Supreme Court has vacated the 300 foot rules established on fracking near: wetlands, lakes, rivers and streams. However, the industry is poised to start contaminating more water sources after they have purchased more of Nestle water stock. Gov. John Corbett has asked politely that the companies pretty please scout's honor the 300 ft rule. Older drilling sites have properties where saltwater breakout brings fracking chemicals to the surface and contaminate underground drinking water aquifers and wells in Wyoming and elsewhere. Hydraulic fracturing uses a process where depleted uranium rounds are shot deep under the earth in the natural gas extraction process. The process uses thousands of unknown chemical substances that are grandfathered from having to report toxicity. Known as the, "Halliburton Loophole," procedures or requirements for drillers of underground injection control (UIC) program are exempt from the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act. This involves millions of gallons of water that must be injected back into the ground once completed since you can't treat radioactive waste-water. Fracking produces 3x as much methane that is beneficial from the release of natural gas. Methane, a destructive greenhouse gas will accelerate climate change at a geometric rate of speed unlike any thing the planet has seen before. Gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean will have similar effects and so will the utilization of the Keystone XL pipeline. If you live on the coastline, buy a boat and swim gear before Kevin Costner corners the market. - Music by : We give appropriate credit and provide a link to the license, and indicate changes were made as needed. Our videos do not in any reasonable manner are affiliated with the following artists. We do not in any way that suggests the artists endorse the work. "Ave formosissima — O Fortuna (reprise)" (by MIT Concert Choir) http://freemusicarchive.org/music/MIT_Concert_Choir/Carmina_Burana_Carl_Orff/24_1946 Pennsylvania health officials ordered to ignore fracking-related health complaints Lindsay Abrams - Salon http://www.salon.com/2014/06/23/pa_health_officials_ordered_to_ignore_fracking_related_health_complaints/ Former Pennsylvania Health Employees Say Bosses Enforced Silence on Shale Drilling by Brandon Baker - Ecowatch http://ecowatch.com/2014/06/19/pennsylvania-health-employees-silence-shale-drilling/ Did Pennsylvania's highest court unravel environmental protections for oil and gas? By Marie Cusick - NPR http://stateimpact.npr.org/pennsylvania/2014/01/10/did-pennsylvanias-highest-court-unravel-environmental-protections-for-oil-and-gas/
Views: 42 takethegate
Liyuan Liang explains how mercury reacts in the environment
 
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ORNL environmental scientist Liyuan Liang discusses her research on how mercury reacts in the environment.
Smoke blankets Adelaide from fire burning at Mulhern Waste Oil depot at Wingfield
 
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Smoke blankets Adelaide from fire burning at Mulhern Waste Oil depot at Wingfield GUARD dogs have perished in the Wingfield waste oil depot inferno, which has spewed thick, black smoke over the city. At the height of the blaze, flames swallowed three cars parked on the street and explosions sprayed flames up to 100m into the air. The fire started above the Mulhern Waste Oil depot on Wing St, Wingfield, about 11.30am. One firefighter was taken to hospital with burns to his hand after a silo of flammable fluid exploded just before 1.30pm. Police evacuated businesses within 150m of the property as a thick pillar of black smoke billowed into the air and explosions rang out. More than 100 Metropolitan Fire Service and Country Fire Service firefighters, with help from a water bombing helicopter, fought the inferno in 34C heat. The Advertiser understands two guard dogs on the site perished in the blaze. The owners have not been able to reach a third dog, locked in a kennel at a neighbouring business Twenty-two other dogs, locked in kennels at a nearby guard dog business, were also left unattended because police refused entry to employees and the RSPCA. A concerned staff member, who did not want to be named, said he was worried that the dogs would be distressed due to the smoke and loud explosions. "I understand it's a danger zone, but two of our dogs had already perished in that fire," the man said. MFS deputy chief officer Mick Smith was confident crews had "knocked down" the flames by 7pm but said the site would continue to smoulder and crews would remain on site. He said high fuel loads made extinguishing the fire extremely difficult and efforts had focused on preventing the blaze from spreading. "It is difficult, it's hot, and we have had some issues to deal with," he said. "It's a very large fire, there is oil and fuel that's been involved and that has flowed and spread. There is a very high fire load." Mr Smith said damage was evident beyond the Mulhern site but the extent was not known. "I expect there to be some damage to some of the neighbouring businesses," he said. Mr Smith said a lack of water pressure had also hindered firefighting efforts. "There has been some problems with getting enough water to extinguish the fire," he said. Fire investigators are expected to assess the site today. The Mulhern depot stores waste oils from the cooking and automotive industries. Mainfast Carrying Service workers Rob Harding and Don Barnard, whose yard is metres from the depot, said the fire was out of control quickly. "I walked in about 11.22am, made a coffee, walked out and thought `check this out'," Mr Harding said. "I was speaking to a firefighter and they said `yeah, I've got a couple of appliances on the way' and I said `mate, you want more than a couple'." The MFS said the smoke was not highly toxic but may affect people with respiratory conditions. "The smoke is toxic but the smoke is being drawn up high by the heat and being dissipated," Mr Smith said. "With the precautions that have been taken by staying outside the exclusion zone, I would expect all the members of the public to be OK." Weather bureau senior forecaster Matt Collopy said that if the fire continued to smoulder, winds were likely to keep blowing smoke south-easterly. Monash University Professor Michael Abramson has studied the health effects of bushfire smoke. He said the smoke was unlikely to cause serious health problems, depending on the type of fuel was burning.
Views: 2483 rafeekmo
Mitigation and Adaptation: Connections to Agriculture
 
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Agriculture is in a unique position as an industry to sequester (mitigate) their greenhouse gase emissions. Adaptation to climate change is also a long term risk-management consideration for farmers, ranchers, and ag professionals. For more about this topic, visit http://www.extension.org/pages/60702/animal-agriculture-and-climate-change
Agri-Restoration
 
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Agri-Restorations, LLC, is taking the lead in restoration and reclamation processes for agricultural and environmental landscapes. We at Agri-Restorations pride ourselves in the restoration of flooded agricultural farmland , the process of bringing CRP land acres back into production, rejuvenation of Wetlands, and oil field spills, reducing the residual effects on landscapes after mining and oil field operations have been completed.
Views: 88 Travis Kennedy