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GCSE Physics - Water Waves - Shallow to Deep Water
 
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This tutorial is about how waves can speed up or slow down when then enter a material with a different optical density, or when water waves enter regions of different depths. This change of velocity can cause the waves to change direction - this is called REFRACTION. Subscribe for more physics tutorials like this: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-Physics-Ninja Water waves will refract when then move from shallow to deep water causing them to speed up. As a result, their wavelength will increase and the refracted ray will 'SPEED AWAY' from the normal line. Remember that the wavefronts are always at 90 degrees to the ray. Use 'RNAR' to work through the steps: 1. Ray (incident ray) 2. Normal (line perpendicular to surface where the ray enters) 3. Angles (label the angle of incident and angle of refraction) 4. Use the refraction rule "SPEED AWAY" to determine which direction the refracted ray will bend. Quick question: During refraction, the wavelength and the speed of the wave changes. What does NOT change about the wave? (Answer... the frequency of the wave does not change) So why do waves get faster in deeper water? The answer is a bit complex, but here is an explanation posted at the Illinois Department of Physics: 1. For a shallow fluid, the motion of the fluid is mostly side-to-side. 2. In order to accumulate more fluid in one place (to make the crest of the wave), each little bit of fluid must travel a little farther than it would have to in deeper water. 3. When a wave passes, the bits of fluid (if you could watch one at a time) travel in ellipses. For shallow water, the ellipses are stretched out horizontally, and in very deep water, they are very nearly circular. 4. So for a wave of the same height (top to bottom of the ellipse), the bits of water must travel farther in the shallow tray than the deep tray. 5. Because the waves of the same height in shallow and deep water exert the same pressure differences due to gravity to get the water moving (although the motion is different due to the fact that the bottom is there), similar forces push and pull on the water. 6. To get the water moving farther and faster with the same force takes a longer time for each push, and hence a slower speed for the wave which travels in the shallow water. " (From https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=2223) For more physics flashcards and tutorials visit https://gcsephysicsninja.com/product/waves-flashcards/
Views: 30773 GCSE Physics Ninja
Interference of Waves | Superposition and Interference in light and water waves | Physics
 
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Interference of Waves | Interference and superposition explained in light and water waves with animation | Interference of waves in two dimensions | Physics The phenomena of the light which undergoes refraction and reflection by be explained by the 2 theories of light. They are corpuscular and wave theory of light. But some of the other phenomena such as interference and diffraction can only be explained by wave theory of light. We know that 2 or more wave, motions travel in space at the same time. Sometimes these 2 wave motions combine to and some physical effects take place. Inference is once such physical effect. When 2 or more waves cross each other in the same medium, they both interfere and accident takes. This accident is known as interference of waves. Interference is the combine effect of the disturbance caused by the each individual wave at the same place and at same time. This effect can be understood from the principle of superposition of waves. Principle Of superposition of waves: To understand this concept of the superposition, let's understand some of the examples. When we drop a pin in a tank, we see some circular waves. When other another pin is dropped, we see some more waves. These waves travel in the same tank and some or the other time these superimpose on each other. The resultant wave would have amplitude which is the sum of the displacement due to the individual waves. " The principle of superposition of waves states that when two or more waves travel through the same medium simultaneously, the resultant displacement at any point is the vector sum if the displacement due to the individual waves." In our case the pin is dropped in a ripple tank with 2 pins. If Y1 is the displacement caused at a point due to the first source and Y2 is the displace cause by the 2nd source, then the over displacement R at the point of interference would given by R=Y1+Y2 When both the sources have the same amplitude which then Y1,Y 2 would be equal to Y. When Y1 is due the crest or trough and Y2 is also due a crest or trough the resultant would be the maximum and when Y1 is due to a crest and Y2 is due to a trough or vice versa, the displacement would be minimum. When maximum displacement takes place it's called constructive superposition and when minimum displacement takes place it's called the destructive superposition. In constructive displacement, a maximum displacement curve is produced. Thus, when constructive displacement occurs then the phase difference between the waves would be ZERO or a multiple of 2π. When minimum displacement occurs, wave super impose destructively, the phase difference of the waves would be π or an odd integral multiple of the π. Interference of waves: When superposition of waves occurs, they could be constructive or destructive. This physical effort observed as a result of the superposition of waves is called interference. "The physical effect of the superposition of waves from the sources vibrating with the same frequency and amplitude is called the interference of waves. The physical effect is in the form of vibrations in the amplitude of resultant wave in a given potion of the medium" Interference is a special case of superposition of waves which originate from different sources but have the same amplitude, same frequency.
Views: 323183 Elearnin
WAVES Part 1, GCSE SCIENCE PHYSICS
 
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http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com THE BASIC OF WAVES # Waves can only transfer energy but not matters. # Wavelength is the distance from the crest to crest or trough to trough. # Amplitude is half the height of the wave. # Frequency is the number of wave cycles passing in a second (one second). # The unit of frequency is Hertz which is Hz. # If frequency increases, wavelength decreases and vice versa (which means wavelength and frequency have opposite relationship). # The amplitude determines the loudness in a wave sound. Please like, subscribe and share this video, THANK YOU SO MUCH: https://youtu.be/CHnKkPVhCcE Try my PROGRESS TEST VIDEO: http://youtu.be/Iq-txbebSxg MUSICS: "Son of a Rocket" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Cut and Run" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 2707 sciencetutorial4u
Wave Refraction
 
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Views: 94772 Keith Meldahl
Reflection of Waves in Physics
 
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http://www.physicshelp.ca Free simple easy to follow videos all organized on our website
Views: 52938 PhysicsEH
waves ripples in a  pond
 
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-~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Best explanation on the internet, Please watch: "Ray diagrams Physics - Optical Instruments-Astronomical Telescope" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzII1f3pp-8 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 254 Physics Models
Traveling Waves: Crash Course Physics #17
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug Waves are cool. The more we learn about waves, the more we learn about a lot of things in physics. Everything from earthquakes to music! Ropes can tell us a lot about how traveling waves work so, in this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini uses ropes (and animated ropes) to talk about how waves carry energy and how different kinds of waves transmit energy differently. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 657300 CrashCourse
Physics: Waves Basics
 
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An introduction to Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves
Views: 1401 Philip Matthews
National 5 Physics - Waves - Diffraction & Wavelength
 
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This video covers the relationship between diffraction and wavelength and shows a worked example of how to use it.
Views: 184 FizzicsBoy
Chapter 14.1 What are Waves
 
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These notes go on p.156 of your science notebook. They are due on Monday (19 Mar) for Blocks 2 and 3, and Tuesday (20 Mar) for Blocks 1 and 4. Important Vocabulary: Wave Energy Medium Mechanical Wave Electromagnetic Wave Vibration Transverse Wave Crest Trough Longitudinal Wave Compression Rarefaction
Views: 427 Ms. Cordz
Longitudinal & Transverse Waves
 
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www.deltastep.com
Views: 151446 DeltaStep
WAVE PARAMETERS
 
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PHYSICS - WAVES LECTURE BY SANJIV SIR RGT CLASSES, SAMPLE LECTURE
Views: 492 EDU MANTRA
Bill Nye Waves: Parts of a Wave
 
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My First Project
Views: 49813 Katy Challis
water_wave_dispersion.AVI
 
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Motor-boat wake showing dispersion of water waves. The long wavelength water waves can be seen to travel faster than the short wavelength waves. Follow a wave-crest to see that the phase and group velocity of the water waves is different.
Views: 12213 JNHeyman
Rectifier-1 | Peak Factor | Ripple Factor (Analog Electronics-20) by SAHAV SINGH YADAV
 
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Rectifier, Peak Factor, Ripple Factor, Crest Factor, Form Factor, Average and RMS Values, Types of Rectifiers, PIV Rating, PIV, Playlists- Control System- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbDL5VAU8fk&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9yI6Nr6ot8uoOsVnJzdx1R Signals and Systems- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W68Q6zRbZ6U&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8Jhs5jc3M0lW-_TF3U4GSQ Network Analysis- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBtu5lizPSY&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_10bMXg_gLkvlWLGrns4FF Digital Electronics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N82C1RXwBIM&list=PL00WWA9f-4c-Xbi57DlbC6GC82pxBkL7_ Engineering Mathematics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxb2VIuVPbw&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8SYSeEuPgpMtDir1039Na6 GATE Preparation Strategy- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKbdBuzmqTE&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9X9-N321nwlRpyiUO-aOEE Test Series- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkPxBcehCZU&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_-_mtRYPNg3gesDysdECrV
Views: 2051 GATE CRACKERS
MUHAMMAD ALI AKRAM SETTING RIPPLE TANK.
 
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MUHAMMAD ALI AKRAM PHYSICS .RIPPLE TANK. CRESTS AND TROUGHS.
√ Wave Terminology | The World Communicates | Physics
 
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#iitutor #Physics #TheWorldCommunicates https://www.iitutor.com The wavelength of a transverse wave is the distance between successive crests or troughs measured in the direction of the wave's velocity. Notice that the shape of the wave is repeated or periodic. Each repeated shape represents one complete cycle of the wave. A wavelength is the length of one complete cycle of the wave in the direction of the wave's propagation. For a longitudinal wave, the wavelength is the distance between successive compressions or rarefactions. The amplitude of a wave is defined as the maximum displacement of the medium from its equilibrium position. For a transverse wave, the amplitude is half the distance between a crest and a trough, measured perpendicular to the direction of travel. The amplitude of a sound wave determines the volume (loudness) of the sound, while the amplitude of a light wave determines the brightness of the light. The period of a wave is the time required for one complete cycle of the disturbance. It is also the time for one wavelength to pass a fixed point in the medium, or the time for any point in the medium to complete one whole cycle of the motion it executes as the wave passes. The number of complete cycles that pass a stationary observer per second is called the frequency of the wave. Frequency is measured in cycles per second or hertz (Hz). The period is related to the frequency because the time for one cycle in seconds must be one second divided by the number of cycles per second. For example, if there were five cycles per second the time for one cycle would be 1/5th of a second. The pitch of a sound wave is determined by the sound's frequency. The musical note called middle C has a frequency of 256 Hz, while high C corresponds to a frequency of 512 Hz. The sensation we experience as colour is determined by the frequency of the light waves that enter our eyes. The energy carried per second through an area of one square metre perpendicular to the wave's velocity is called the wave's intensity. The intensity of the wave is a measure of the energy carried by the wave through the medium. The SI units of intensity are watts per square metre. The wave velocity is the speed at which the disturbance moves through a material. It depends on several things: • the kind of wave • the type of material-its density (e.g. are the particles closely packed?). The velocity (v) of a wave depends on its frequency or wavelength, not on the amplitude of the wave. For any given wave the frequency is fixed by the source frequency and the velocity is fixed by the material through which it travels. The frequency and wavelength are related in the following way by the wave equation. The wave motion we have discussed so far is that in which the wave is confined to a string, spring or pipe. If we drop a stone into a pond, the ripples spread out in all directions from the impact point. The ripples are initially circular. If we let off a fire cracker, the blast wave begins to move outward as a spherical pulse. With time, the ideal shape of the front of the disturbance is distorted by intervening objects, and by other disturbances. In each case the waves start in a small group of particles that transfer their vibrational energy to their immediate neighbours. These neighbours pass on the vibration to other particles further from the source of the disturbance. In order to visualise the way in which the disturbance progresses outward it is useful to introduce the idea of a wavefront. At any given time we can join up all of the wave crests, which started from the source at the same time, as a wavefront. Wavefronts that originate from a single point source are usually spherical if they propagate through a volume or circular when they move across a membrane or surface (such as a water-air interface). We can represent the direction in which the wavefront is moving by arrows or rays, drawn at right angles to the wavefront. If we follow one set of arrows from the source outward we may join them to represent a ray. This graph can tell us a lot. For transverse waves the meaning of the displacement axis is obvious. It represents the displacement of particles perpendicular to the energy’s direction. However for longitudinal waves the actual displacement is in the direction of propagation of the wave and the up-or-down direction now represents the displacement from rest. The horizontal axis can he interpreted either as a space (distance) axis, or as a time axis. As the wave progresses, the different points on the wave (such as point X) are affected by the wave. If we consider the zero of time to occur at the instant shown, then it follows that point X will remain at rest for another second (the wave has to travel 1 cm at 1 cm/s and so takes 1 s to do so). It will then move down so that after a further 5 s its displacement will be -1.0 unit.
Views: 453 iitutor.com
√ Waves and Energy Transfer - World Communicates | Physics-
 
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#iitutor #Physics #WorldCommunicates https://www.iitutor.com The development of our civilisation would have been impossible without effective communication. The early development of speech and later the written word allowed us to evolve a cohesive community that was capable of passing ideas and beliefs from generation to generation. The messenger carrying the information has been supplanted by electromagnetic means of transmission that allow transfer of data at close to the speed of light. To all intents and purposes, the sending and receiving of data over satellite links is instantaneous, limited only by the speed of coding and decoding the information into suitable forms for transmission. Speech and many modern means of communication utilise waves. There are many different kinds of waves. The most obvious form of waves are those upon which we surf. Less obvious are sound waves, and possibly the least obvious are light or electromagnetic waves. In this section we discuss what waves really are, and their importance in the world around us. All waves share one thing in common, they provide a means of transferring energy from one point to another without the physical movement of particles from one point to another. Ocean waves are generated thousands of kilometres out to sea by the action of wind on the surface of the ocean. The energy transferred to the surface of the ocean eventually reaches land a few days later as a breaking wave. However, the water molecules that were originally moved by the wind far out at sea do not move far from their original positions. They pass on their energy to neighbouring molecules, which in turn affect their neighbours. In this way energy is transferred without mass motion. If you put energy into a string or rope by shaking one end up and down, the other end of the string will also begin to move up and down. Energy will have been transferred along the string, but the molecules of the string will not have moved from their original relative positions. In a similar way electromagnetic radiation (which includes light) can be thought of as the transfer of energy from one place to another by varying electrostatic and magnetic fields. If you could take hold of an electron in one corner of the room and shake it up and down, you would find that other electrons at the other side of the room would begin to vibrate a split second later. Energy is transferred from one side of the room to the other by an electromagnetic wave. If particles and molecules don't actually move from one place to another when energy is transferred by a wave, what actually happens to the individual particles? Let's consider what happens if we drop a rock into a pool. Ripples spread out from the position where the rock entered the pool and eventually reach the pool's edge. Floating twigs and straw near the centre of the pool are not washed ashore, instead they begin moving up and down about an equilibrium point. Their vertical motion is a form of simple harmonic motion. This vertical oscillation is transferred outward from one region of the pool to the next. As the oscillation builds up in one area it dies away in the preceding area. The wave is seen to travel out from the pool's centre. Waves travel through the medium carrying energy only: they do not take any part of the medium with them. They cause an oscillation of the particles in the medium as they pass, but every particle returns to its equilibrium position after each complete cycle of the wave. In this way the particles of the medium transmit the wave but do not move along with it, and we can think of the wave as energy moving through the medium. Waves are disturbances that transfer energy from one point in a medium to another point. They may propagate in one, two or three dimensions depending on the type of wave and the medium through which it is moving. The best way to understand how waves are formed and how they travel is to consider a single pulse or wave hump. We can make such a pulse on a horizontal string resting on a table by rapidly flicking one end of the string up then down. As your hand pulls the end of the string up, adjacent pieces of the string feel a force that also accelerates them in a vertical direction. They in turn affect neighbouring pieces of string. As each succeeding piece of string moves upward, the crest of the pulse moves along the string. By now your hand has returned to its starting position and the end of the string has also returned to its original position. As adjacent pieces of string reach the top of their motion they experience a force pulling them back toward their starting positions. The source of the pulse is the motion of your hand, and the pulse is transferred down the string because of cohesive forces (tension) between the particles of the string. PB2111 http://youtu.be/YklnpsauXaM
Views: 5613 iitutor.com
Waves in 2D Interference Patterns Part 3 High School College Physics Help
 
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http://www.physicseh.com/ Free simple easy to follow videos all organized on our website.
Views: 7976 PhysicsEH
How Do You Find The Amplitude Of A Wave?
 
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What is amplitude? Amplitude particle displacement how to intensity the physics hypertextbook. What is amplitude? Definition & frequency video lesson properties of periodic waves (video) amplitude a wave? . Each describes a separate parameter in the most general solution of wave equation. Amplitude of a waveformula for amplitude wave. It is denoted by a and given in decibels (db). Each of these properties is described in more detail below. The sine wave is represented as. Lesson 44 frequency, wavelength, amplitude studyphysics!what is the of a light wave? Quora. They include amplitude, frequency, period, wavelength, speed, and phase. The amplitude formula is given by. Brilliant math physics for kids properties of waves ducksters. Where a is amplitude and angular frequency. As discussed by feynman, 'there are, in fact, an infinite number of different possibilities for [energy density] and [flux], so far no one has thought experimental way to tell which is right!' 1 nov 2012 what wave amplitude how measure it, determines the a 25 2011. The relationship between the energy and amplitude of a wave why intensity light(wave) is proportional to square its ( read ) physics video by brightstorm. Where d is frequency, wavelength, amplitude and wave speed. Loudness is a perceptual response to the physical property of intensity. Amplitude, frequency, wavenumber, and phase shift are properties of waves that govern their physical behavior. Graphing a wave when drawing or looking at on graph, we draw the as snapshot in time for longitudinal wave, such sound amplitude is measured by maximum displacement of particle from its position equilibrium. The maximum height observed in the wave is called as amplitude. Another thing scientists measure in waves is the wave's amplitude or height. The amplitude of a wave is measured as the height from equilibrium point to highest crest or. Sound waves in air are longitudinal, pressure it is an objective quantity associated with a wave. The wavelength,, of a wave is the distance from any point on one to same next along 24 apr 2015. Together, these properties account for a wide range of phenomena such as loudness, color, pitch, diffraction, and there are many that scientists use to describe waves. As a general rule the larger amplitude, greater intensity, louder sound. Amplitude is the distance from rest position to crest which half vertical a trough. That is, how do you measure the height or amplitude of a wave? Look at these diagrams and see if can figure out good definition for poster from that link is saying work done by spring (that's hooke's law there f k x ) equal to potential energy (pe) maximum displacement,; This pe comes kinetic (ke) integral over range 0 (minimum displacement) (maximum it effectively defined way because it's simplest form satisfies relevant conservation equation. The amplitude of a variable is measure its change over single period. What exactly do we mean by a wave's 'amplitude'. Tutorvista physics a
Views: 78 Wade Wade
Full Wave Bridge Rectifier (Analog Electronics-23) by SAHAV SINGH YADAV
 
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Full Wave Bridge Rectifier, Full Wave Rectifier, Transfer Characteristics of Full Wave Rectifier, Output Wave form of Half Wave Rectifier, Rectifier, Peak Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Ripple Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Crest Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Form Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Average and RMS Values, Types of Rectifiers, PIV Rating, PIV of Half Wave Rectifier, Playlists- Control System- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbDL5VAU8fk&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9yI6Nr6ot8uoOsVnJzdx1R Signals and Systems- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W68Q6zRbZ6U&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8Jhs5jc3M0lW-_TF3U4GSQ Network Analysis- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBtu5lizPSY&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_10bMXg_gLkvlWLGrns4FF Digital Electronics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N82C1RXwBIM&list=PL00WWA9f-4c-Xbi57DlbC6GC82pxBkL7_ Engineering Mathematics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxb2VIuVPbw&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8SYSeEuPgpMtDir1039Na6 GATE Preparation Strategy- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKbdBuzmqTE&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9X9-N321nwlRpyiUO-aOEE Test Series- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkPxBcehCZU&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_-_mtRYPNg3gesDysdECrV
Views: 1158 GATE CRACKERS
Waves
 
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Mr. Andersen introduces the concept of waves. Both transverse and logitudinal waves are described. The relationship between wave speed, wave frequency and wavelength is also included. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 118025 Bozeman Science
Deconstructive Interference
 
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Two waves interfering destructively. For more information on this and many other demonstrations of physics and astronomy, please visit us at: http://demos.smu.ca
Views: 5171 SMUPhysics
Interference Patterns Waves in 2d Part 1 Physics Lesson
 
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http://www.physicseh.com/ Free simple easy to follow videos all organized on our website.
Views: 32843 PhysicsEH
Full Wave Rectifier (Form Factor & Ripple Factor)
 
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Analog Electronics: Full Wave Rectifier (Form Factor & Ripple Factor) Topics Covered: 1. Calculation of form factor. 2. Calculation of ripple factor. Contribute: http://www.nesoacademy.org/donate Website ► http://www.nesoacademy.org/ Facebook ► https://goo.gl/Nt0PmB Twitter ► https://twitter.com/nesoacademy Pinterest ► http://www.pinterest.com/nesoacademy/
Views: 50260 Neso Academy
Finding Wavelength from Diagram | Waves | Physics
 
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This video is created by http://www.onlinetuition.com.my/ More videos and free notes are available at http://spmphysics.onlinetuition.com.my/
Views: 5411 myhometuition
superposition of sea waves
 
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A short clip taken at Gisborne, New Zealand. Small ocean waves reflecting off a concrete sea wall. Wavefronts of incident and reflected waves clearly noticeable, as well as constructive interference of the crests.
Views: 4255 DarylSmithNZ
2 Diffraction
 
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This 28 second video shows waves diffracting around both side of a large rock and forming a crest in the 'shadow' of the rock.
Views: 331 Rory Geoghegan
Waves as Carriers of Energy
 
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Physics_p-9-10-shm-15.mp4
Views: 2384 Sabaq. Pk
Breaking wave packet
 
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This is a paddle-generated wave packet made in the SUSTAIN laboratory (http://sustain.rsmas.miami.edu/). Each wave crest experiences growing instability as they propagate down-tank and they break at a predictable location. This is the result of Go-Pro camera and a couple hours to kill. Filming done on Univ. of Miami campus.
Views: 156 RSMAS SUSTAIN-LAB
Displacement-Distance and Displacement-Time Graphs
 
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For N' Science Physics, O' Science Physics, O' Pure Physics Presented by: Mr Oh Ming Yeo
Views: 24897 ohmingyeo
Labelling a wave
 
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A transverse wave is labelled using the key terms and symbols.
Views: 169 Science Revision
Light Is Waves: Crash Course Physics #39
 
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The way light behaves can seem very counter intuitive, and many physicists would agree with that, but once you figure out light waves it all starts to make more sense! In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini shows us how we know that light exists as a wave and why that's really cool! Want more Crash Course in person? We'll be at NerdCon: Nerdfighteria in Boston on February 25th and 26th! For more information, go to http://www.nerdconnerdfighteria.com/ *** Get your own Crash Course Physics mug from DFTBA: http://store.dftba.com/products/crash... The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 434616 CrashCourse
Physics with Mr. Noon: Transverse Waves
 
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Here are some classroom demonstrations to discuss Transverse Waves.
Views: 10710 Brendan Noon
Writing Shaders In Unity - Water and Waves - Beginner Tutorial
 
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Help to support the channel if you are feeling super kind: https://www.patreon.com/dapperdino Join my Discord: https://discord.gg/sn9xXK4 Join Programmer's Valley: https://discord.gg/PDeb5J8 In this video I show you how to start coding your own shaders from scratch in Unity with vertex displacement in the form of waves :D ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you liked the video then please respond with a like and a subscribe to show your support for the channel and I'll repay you by creating more tutorials to teach you the wonder that is Unity :D
How Can You Measure The Frequency Of The Wave?
 
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Measuring sound science learning hub. 10 may 2011 frequency is measured in hertz (hz). Measured in hertz (hz). Frequency is a measurement of how often recurring event such as wave occurs in measured amount time. Here we are discussing about wave 11jen 2013. Therefore, the vibrator should be adjusted to lowest frequency number of waves that pass a fixed point in given amount time is wave. Bbc gcse bitesize amplitude, wavelength and frequency. One completion of the repeating how do we measure and describe waves? How waves differ based upon their shapes? This lesson will guide you through five wave parameters determining frequency from a graphfrequency #of cycles time. Diagram the wavelength measurement is then used in a simple equation relating speed of wave, its and frequency period formula angular cycle per second hertz hz amplitude formulary where f wave measured you need to be able see specific faces that each can have, based on three example 2 have 60hz. [email protected] calculating frequency of a wave youtube. Determining wave frequency from a graph youtube. Wave frequency, how to calculate frequency. Properties of periodic waves (video) estimating wavelength, frequency, and velocity ripplesck 12 foundationwave parameters amplitude, period, frequency determining wave from a graph world teaching. Cycle full wave to repeat itself510 14 oct 2000 water wavesmeasure the frequency and wavelength of a then compute its velocity. Easy ways to calculate frequency (with pictures) wikihow. For sound, this means the number of pressure waves per second that would move past a fixed point wavelength wave is distance between on one and same next. If its i'm working on a science fair project and thinking about measuring how sound wave's frequency is different in the three states of matter 16wave velocity very difficult to measure except for low ripples long wavelength. Determining wave frequency from a graph slideshare. Ask an expert measuring sound speed frequency science buddies. It is often easiest to measure this from the crest of frequency, wavelength, amplitude and wave speed used in waves what they mean, symbols for them units. Frequency, wavelength, amplitude, & wave speed bbc. Frequency and period of a wave the physics classroom this rate 2 cycles second is referred to as frequency. Wave frequency can be measured by counting the number of crests or. Frequency and period of a wave the physics classroom. Period, being a time, is measured in units of time such as seconds, hours, days or the formula for frequency wave vacuum almost identical to that 31 oct 2010 determining from graphdetermining graphf #of cycles hertz we know some important terms include frequency, number, length, velocity etc. How is the frequency of a photon light measured? long does formula period time cycle per second hertz hz lesson 44 frequency, wavelength, amplitude studyphysics!.
Views: 148 Sityui Spun
Constructive and destructive interference in water waves Video 1 of 4
 
00:28
One plus one equals two. That is true in understanding how one wave crest interact with another wave crest of the same phase, which in common terms is in sync. When out of sync, such as one wave crest meeting a wave trough, one plus negative one equal zero. This is the essence of constructive and destructive interference in wave dynamics. Understandable when presented as in above, what is difficult is in understanding how two or more wave propagations interact at specific points of space in their interference zone. The tool to do this is Huygens’ construction, but although graphical in nature, it is a major bugbear of most students in understanding wave dynamics. Because students could not visualize the cross interaction lines on their Huygens’ construction, and determine which nodes are constructive interference and where are the destructive ones. The intellectual leap needed to overcome the last point is crucial to understanding wave dynamics and using it to solve problems in hydraulics, design of breakwater location, and how earthquake waves move through earth. The four videos in this series features waves associated with high tide coming to shore at Labrador Park, Singapore that manifest in clear constructive and destructive interference zones. Waves breaking up into foamy water as it nears shallow land can also be observed. Hopefully, the videos would be useful for students to visualize wave dynamics and researchers seeking to understand the hydrology of Labrador Park in Singapore. A preprint accompanying this video can be found at: https://figshare.com/articles/Videos_on_constructive_and_destructive_interference_in_wave_dynamics_and_how_waves_breakup_in_shallow_areas/3839502
Views: 831 Wenfa Ng
Waves on the surface of water HD
 
00:58
The waves on the surface of the water are neither longitudinal nor transverse. We can see in animation that red ball, which simulates the molecule of the water surface, moves in a circle path. So, the wave on the water surface is the superposition of transverse and longitudinal motions of the molecules. The molecules on the water surface move under the action of surface tension and gravity. Next animation simulates the wave motion of the molecules in the surface layer of water (or other liquid). If the amplitude of this wave is small, then every molecule moves in a circle path. The radii of these circles are diminishing with depth, so the balls in bottom part of animation are still.
Views: 187162 Alexander C
7.2.6 Reflection and diffraction of mechanical waves in two-dimensions
 
01:17
https://www.braingenie.com/topics/11561/
Views: 378 braingenie
Day 3 Wave Phenomena Part 1
 
05:58
Types of waves and more definitions
Views: 383 Ivanell George
Half Wave Rectifier (Analog Electronics-21) by SAHAV SINGH YADAV
 
24:29
Half Wave Rectifier, Output Wave form of Half Wave Rectifier, Rectifier, Peak Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Ripple Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Crest Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Form Factor of Half Wave Rectifier, Average and RMS Values, Types of Rectifiers, PIV Rating, PIV of Half Wave Rectifier, Playlists- Control System- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbDL5VAU8fk&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9yI6Nr6ot8uoOsVnJzdx1R Signals and Systems- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W68Q6zRbZ6U&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8Jhs5jc3M0lW-_TF3U4GSQ Network Analysis- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBtu5lizPSY&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_10bMXg_gLkvlWLGrns4FF Digital Electronics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N82C1RXwBIM&list=PL00WWA9f-4c-Xbi57DlbC6GC82pxBkL7_ Engineering Mathematics- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxb2VIuVPbw&list=PL00WWA9f-4c8SYSeEuPgpMtDir1039Na6 GATE Preparation Strategy- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKbdBuzmqTE&list=PL00WWA9f-4c9X9-N321nwlRpyiUO-aOEE Test Series- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkPxBcehCZU&list=PL00WWA9f-4c_-_mtRYPNg3gesDysdECrV
Views: 1451 GATE CRACKERS
Grade 11 Physics Rogue Wave Project
 
01:16
Create an animation of a rogue wave. Your animation should explain what they are and how they are created, along with a full animation of a rogue wave.
Views: 1009 CISTokyo
ScienceMan Digital Lesson - Waves - Law of Reflection
 
04:51
ScienceMan.com provides free digital lessons and technology integration help for teachers and students. In this digital lesson, the law of reflection is demonstrated and discussed. ScienceMan™ and ScienceMan Digital Lessons are protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Views: 2757 ScienceMandotcom
transverse waves changed frequency.AVI
 
00:38
This video shows a transverse wave using a slinky and changing its' frequency but keeping the amplitude the same.
Views: 452 Mrs. Henning
Segment of the coastline. Seawall. (Rendered in Unity)
 
01:37
This video is a demonstration of rendering fluid simulation in real-time with Unity. It is an attempt to simulate the flow near a seawall. Discussion: https://forum.unity.com/threads/water-system-based-on-fluid-simulation.504291/
Views: 3534 NHydro N
What is MECHANICAL WAVE? What does MECHANICAL WAVE mean? MECHANICAL WAVE meaning & explanation
 
04:06
What is MECHANICAL WAVE? What does MECHANICAL WAVE mean? MECHANICAL WAVE meaning & explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A mechanical wave is a wave that is an oscillation of matter, and therefore transfers energy through a medium. While waves can move over long distances, the movement of the medium of transmission—the material—is limited. Therefore, oscillating material does not move far from its initial equilibrium position. Mechanical waves transport energy. This energy propagates in the same direction as the wave. Any kind of wave (mechanical or electromagnetic) has a certain energy. Mechanical waves can be produced only in media which possess elasticity and inertia. A mechanical wave requires an initial energy input. Once this initial energy is added, the wave travels through the medium until all its energy is transferred. In contrast, electromagnetic waves require no medium, but can still travel through one. One important property of mechanical waves is that their amplitudes are measured in an unusual way, displacement divided by (reduced) wavelength. When this gets comparable to unity, significant nonlinear effects such as harmonic generation may occur, and, if large enough, may result in chaotic effects. For example, waves on the surface of a body of water break when this dimensionless amplitude exceeds 1, resulting in a foam on the surface and turbulent mixing. Some of the most common examples of mechanical waves are water waves, sound waves, and seismic waves. There are three types of mechanical waves: transverse waves, longitudinal waves, and surface waves. Transverse waves cause the medium to vibrate at a right angle to the direction of the wave or energy being carried by the medium. Transverse waves have two parts—the crest and the trough. The crest is the highest point of the wave and the trough is the lowest. The distance between a crest and a trough is half of wavelength. The wavelength is the distance from crest to crest or from trough to trough. To see an example, move an end of a Slinky (whose other end is fixed) to the left-and-right of the Slinky (as opposed to-and-fro the Slinky). Light also has properties of a transverse wave, although it is an electromagnetic wave. Longitudinal waves cause the medium to vibrate parallel to the direction of the wave. It consists of multiple compressions and rarefactions. The rarefaction is the farthest distance apart in the longitudinal wave and the compression is the closest distance together. The speed of the longitudinal wave is increased in higher index of refraction, due to the closer proximity of the atoms in the medium that is being compressed. Sound is considered a longitudinal wave. This type of wave travels along a surface that is between two media. An example of a surface wave would be waves in a pool, or in an ocean, lake, or any other type of water body. There are two types of surface waves, namely Rayleigh waves and Love waves. Rayleigh waves, also known as ground roll, are waves that travel as ripples with motion similar to those of waves on the surface of water. Rayleigh waves are much slower than body waves, roughly 90% of the velocity of body waves for a typical homogeneous elastic medium. A Love wave is a surface waves having horizontal waves that are shear or transverse to the direction of propagation. They usually travel slightly faster than Rayleigh waves, about 90% of the body wave velocity, and have the largest amplitude.
Views: 7597 The Audiopedia
Wave Interference
 
00:13
A simple yet affective way to show wave superposition. When the high parts of the wave (crests) are lined up, the resulting wave is larger in amplitude. When a high part and a low part (trough) meet, the result is a wave of zero amplitude, or a straight line.
Views: 49878 MsBarnett
Constructive and destructive interference in water waves Video 2 of 4
 
01:30
One plus one equals two. That is true in understanding how one wave crest interact with another wave crest of the same phase, which in common terms is in sync. When out of sync, such as one wave crest meeting a wave trough, one plus negative one equal zero. This is the essence of constructive and destructive interference in wave dynamics. Understandable when presented as in above, what is difficult is in understanding how two or more wave propagations interact at specific points of space in their interference zone. The tool to do this is Huygens’ construction, but although graphical in nature, it is a major bugbear of most students in understanding wave dynamics. Because students could not visualize the cross interaction lines on their Huygens’ construction, and determine which nodes are constructive interference and where are the destructive ones. The intellectual leap needed to overcome the last point is crucial to understanding wave dynamics and using it to solve problems in hydraulics, design of breakwater location, and how earthquake waves move through earth. The four videos in this series features waves associated with high tide coming to shore at Labrador Park, Singapore that manifest in clear constructive and destructive interference zones. Waves breaking up into foamy water as it nears shallow land can also be observed. Hopefully, the videos would be useful for students to visualize wave dynamics and researchers seeking to understand the hydrology of Labrador Park in Singapore. A preprint accompanying this video can be found at: https://figshare.com/articles/Videos_on_constructive_and_destructive_interference_in_wave_dynamics_and_how_waves_breakup_in_shallow_areas/3839502
Views: 264 Wenfa Ng

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