Home
Search results “Cryptochrome circadian rhythm examples”
Circadian Rhythm and Your Brain's Clock
 
04:10
Why do we sleep at night instead of during the day? In this episode of SciShow Hank talks about circadian rhythms, how they work, and how they regulate different processes in our bodies. ---------- Our President of Space for this episode: http://www.youtube.com/user/Kurzgesagt ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18419318 http://www.livescience.com/13123-circadian-rhythms-obesity-diabetes-nih.html http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/sleep-topics/sleep-drive-and-your-body-clock http://www.aasmnet.org/resources/factsheets/crsd.pdf http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/sleep_cycles_body_clock.htm http://www.princeton.edu/~ota/disk1/1991/9108/910805.PDF http://news.uci.edu/press-releases/circadian-rhythms-control-bodys-response-to-intestinal-infections-uci-led-study-finds/ http://blogs.nature.com/news/2012/03/gaining-control-of-our-circadian-rhythms.html http://news.yale.edu/2013/06/17/rhythm-everything http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10000872396390444180004578018294057070544
Views: 599765 SciShow
cryptochrome
 
09:24
Views: 2063 slideshow
2-Minute Neuroscience: Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
 
01:59
The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) are thought to be involved with maintaining circadian rhythms, or biological patterns that follow a 24-hour cycle. To accomplish this, the cells of the SCN contain biological clocks. In this video, I discuss the molecular mechanism driving the biological clocks in the cells of the mammalian SCN, and how a cycle of gene expression allows the activity of these cells to follow a 24-hour pattern. TRANSCRIPT: Welcome to 2 minute neuroscience, where I simplistically explain neuroscience topics in 2 minutes or less. In this installment I will discuss the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The suprachiasmatic nuclei, or SCN, are two small, paired nuclei found in the hypothalamus; they are involved in maintaining circadian rhythms, or biological patterns that follow a 24-hour cycle. To accomplish this, the cells of the SCN contain biological clocks. The following is a simplified description of the molecular mechanism of the biological clocks in the mammalian SCN. Cells in the SCN produce two proteins called Clock and BMAL1. Clock and BMAL1 bind together and promote the expression of genes called period, or per, and cryptochrome, or cry. The protein products of these genes, Per and Cry, then bind together and inhibit the actions of Clock and BMAL1, which in turn suppresses the production of Per and Cry. Gradually, however, the Per and Cry proteins break down. When Per and Cry degrade fully, Clock and BMAL1 are free to act again; they go back to promoting the expression of per and cry, starting the cycle anew. The process consistently takes around 24 hours to complete before it repeats. It is thought that this cycle of gene expression is what acts as the molecular clock in SCN cells, although the process is actually more complex as there are multiple period and cryptochrome genes as well as other proteins involved in the complete mechanism. The SCN can use information it receives from the retina about light in the environment to make adjustments to the circadian clock. Such information travels from the retina to the SCN along a path called the retinohypothalamic tract. References: Colwell, C. (2011). Linking neural activity and molecular oscillations in the SCN Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 12 (10), 553-569 DOI: 10.1038/nrn3086 Dibner, C., Schibler, U., Albrecht, U. (2010). The mammalian circadian timing system: organization and coordination of central and peripheral clocks Annual review of physiology, 72 (1), 517-549.
PHOTOTROPIN- CSIR-NET| GATE |  Plant biology | sensory photobiology
 
12:48
TOPIC: PHOTOTROPIN This topic is taken from the plant biology part of CSIR-NET/GATE-LIFESCIENCE and BARC. Phototropin is a blue light photoreceptor. All the important topic From exam point of view regarding the phototropin has been discussed in this lectures #Phototropin #sensoryphotobiology #CSIRNET Phytochrome-for CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/AkRxzA6AbJI CRYPTOCHROME- For CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/cOOnt_hicFU Introduction to Evolution- For CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 For Knowing the Content of this channel https://youtu.be/SA_UVC4z-zQ Introduction of Evolution for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 Flower Development genes for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/fM8AIxZh7fM thank you. LIKE SHARE and Subscribe for more such videos
Views: 607 TEACHING PATHSHALA
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 1A: Circadian Clocks: Clock Genes, Cells and Circuits
 
33:18
https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/ Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 15948 iBiology
Exploring different optogenetic systems: Light-induced dimerisation
 
05:01
This video is part of our brand new e-learning course on optogenetics, https://www.embl.de/training/e-learning/optogenetics/index.html. Light-induced dimerisation is the most commonly-used method in non-neuronal optogenetics. When exposed to light of a specific wavelength, a photosensitive protein domain undergoes a conformational change which then causes it to bind to an interaction partner to form dimers or oligomers. This video introduces three prominent dimerisation systems: the cryptochrome, the phytochrome and LOV domain-based iLID systems. Executive producer, stop motion animation & voice over: Richard Grandison Scientific concept & graphic design: Daniel Krueger Video producer & motion graphics: Claudiu Grozea Scientific advisor: Stefano de Renzis
Phytochrome
 
07:43
This lecture talks about phytochromes and the role of phytochromes in plant photoperiordism and photosynthesis. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 51887 Shomu's Biology
Photoperiodic Flowering - Part 2
 
07:48
This video tutorial was produced by members of the BioClock Studio Winter 2017 at UC San Diego. It describes molecular mechanisms how plants decide when it’s time to flower based on their ability to precisely measure day- and night-lengths, a phenomenon that is called “Photoperiodic Flowering."
Views: 978 The BioClock Studio
Photoactivation mechanism of cryptochrome 2.
 
06:41
Nambin presents photoactivation mechanism of cryptochrome 2. The basic working principle was simple. CRY2 undergoes conformational change catalyzed by blue light, and then N-terminal photolyase homology region (PHR) of CRY2 reversibly associating with the CIBN. In this context, one question is hit upon. How can CRY2 be changed and bind to CIB1 by blue light? There is one hypothesis, that is, tryptophan-triad dependent photoreduction.
Views: 1620 [email protected]
Cryptochrome Meaning
 
00:26
Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what cryptochrome means. Any of several light-sensitive flavoproteins, in the protoreceptors of plants, that regulate germination, elongation and photoperiodism. Cryptochrome Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say cryptochrome. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 805 ADictionary
Circadian rhythm
 
25:58
A circadian rhythm /sɜrˈkeɪdiən/ is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and rhythms have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" (or "approximately"), and diem or dies, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous ("built-in", self-sustained), they are adjusted (entrained) to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers, commonly the most important of which is daylight. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2365 Audiopedia
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 3: Circadian Clocks: Molecular Basis of a Clock
 
34:28
https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/#part-4 Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 3269 iBiology
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 2: Circadian Clocks: Genetics of Mammalian Clocks
 
41:40
https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/#part-3 Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 7006 iBiology
What does cryptochrome mean?
 
00:41
What does cryptochrome mean? A spoken definition of cryptochrome. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cryptochrome Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Dr. Satchin Panda on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health
 
01:31:34
Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks with Dr. Satchidananda Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. Satchin's work deals specifically with the timing of food and it's relationship with our biological clocks governed by circadian rhythm and also the circadian rhythm in general. ▶︎ Get the show notes! https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-panda In this video we discuss... •The fascinating history of experimentation that ultimately elucidated the location for the region of the brain necessary for a properly timed sleep-wake cycles. • The relationship between our body's "master clock" and it's many peripheral clocks. • Why infants sleep so intermittently, instead of resting for a longer, sustained duration like healthy young adults... and why this sustained rest also goes haywire in the elderly. • The fascinating work Dr. Panda took part in that lead to the discovery of a specialized light receptor in the eye that sets circadian rhythms and is known as melanopsin. • The important relationship between the relatively light insensitive melanopsin, which requires around 1,000 lux of light to be fully activated, and its control of the circadian clock by means of activation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and suppression of melatonin. • The effects light exposure seems to have on next-day cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone that regulates around 10-20% of the human protein-encoding genome. • The clever experimental design by which Dr. Panda and his colleagues discovered that certain circadian rhythms, especially of the liver, are entrained by when we eat, instead of how much light we get. This underlines the fact that, when managing are circadian rhythm, both elements are important! • One of the more surprising effects of time-restricted feeding in mice eating a so-called healthy diet: increases in muscle mass and even endurance in some cases. You can try out time-restricted feeding and contribute to human research! Commit to 14 weeks and download Dr. Panda's mobile app to get started. Learn more: http://mycircadianclock.org/participant ▶︎ Visit Satchin Panda's Website: http://www.mycircadianclock.org/ ▶︎ Satchin Panda on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SatchinPanda Links related to FoundMyFitness: ▶︎ Subscribe on YouTube: http://youtube.com/user/FoundMyFitness?sub_confirmation=1 ▶︎ Join my weekly email newsletter: http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=lifestyle-heuristic ▶︎ Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 ▶︎ Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 442121 FoundMyFitness
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 1B: Circadian Clocks: Clock Genes, Cells and Circuits 2
 
30:24
https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/#part-2 Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 5628 iBiology
Circadian rhythm
 
27:33
A circadian rhythm /sɜrˈkeɪdiən/ is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and rhythms have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" , and diem or dies, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous , they are adjusted to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers, commonly the most important of which is daylight. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 485 encyclopediacc
CIRCADIAN rhythm - WikiVidi Documentary
 
32:49
A circadian rhythm is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These 24-hour rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and they have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" , and diēm, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Processes with 24-hour oscillations are more generally called diurnal rhythms; strictly speaking, they should not be called circadian rhythms unless their endogenous nature is confirmed. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous , they are adjusted to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers , which include light, temperature and redox cycles. In medical science, an abnormal circadian rhythm in humans is known as circadian rhythm disorder. In 2017, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:01:33: History 00:04:09: Origin 00:08:39: Importance in animals 00:09:18: Effect of circadian disruption 00:10:06: Effect of light–dark cycle 00:11:42: Arctic animals 00:12:56: Butterfly migration 00:13:16: In plants 00:17:36: Biological clock in mammals 00:19:47: Humans 00:20:46: Biological markers and effects 00:23:46: Outside the "master clock" 00:24:48: Light and the biological clock 00:25:15: Enforced longer cycles 00:26:09: Human health 00:27:11: Indoor lighting 00:27:43: Obesity and diabetes 00:28:43: Airline pilots (and cabin crew) 00:29:24: Disruption 00:30:36: Effect of drugs ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circadian_rhythm
7 Ways EMF Technology Seriously Threatens Entire Populations
 
08:57
Today's Alternative News Channel - 7 Ways EMF Technology Seriously Threatens Entire Populations Guest writer for Wake Up World Recently, over 180 medics and scientists sent a document to the European Union appealing for the suspension of the new 5G EMF technology planned to roll out. Essentially, the 11 page document warns that EMF technology is a serious environmental hazard, harmful to life. That the new 5G EMF technology has not been properly tested for safety and has been blindly approved without health evaluation. The medics and scientists call for a proper health evaluation and while being carried out a suspension of the 5G. However, the unconditional push for EMF technology continues. The push involves a number of individuals, particularly those in high places, biased and blinded by money or the want for control or population reduction, only seeing the EMF technology’s advantages. Flawed ideology and insanity ensues… In reflection of this, if allowed to continue uncontested, here are 7 ways by which EMF technology seriously threatens not just the health and life of humans, but also endangers the existence of non-human populations through upsetting the delicate balance of life. Remember, without nature’s delicate and intricate balance we will cease to exist. Source: https://wakeup-world.com/2017/10/31/7-ways-emf-technology-seriously-threatens-entire-populations/ See our playlist for additional information: POLITICS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3vNhMt4w_SI_yFQvfelBTllKUpszHtGt HEALTH NEWS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3vNhMt4w_SKrC2qOLET6ydlt3Lvx29i_ TECH AND SCIENCE STUFF: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3vNhMt4w_SKhC5M0NKTePMwwwezcPFjL Today's Alternative News https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV6WBPEdQPZAVddWfmk1-Dg https://youtu.be/DZPjllgGP-A
Plant physiology
 
22:39
Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2209 Audiopedia
Anthropogeny and Medicine-Genes that Harm Health; Sleep and Health; High Altitude Adaptation
 
59:55
2:02 Why Genes That Harm Health Persist - Randolph Nesse 20:38 Shining Evolutionary Light on Human Sleep and Health - Charles Nunn 41:31 Adaptations to High Altitude - Cynthia Beall (Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) This symposium brings together experts who offer examples of applications of evolutionary biology and comparative medicine to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of various illnesses. Recorded on 10/14/2016. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [12/2016] [Science] [Show ID: 31598]
Monarch butterfly
 
30:49
The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is a milkweed butterfly (subfamily Danainae) in the family Nymphalidae. It may be the most familiar North American butterfly. Its wings feature an easily recognizable orange and black pattern, with a wingspan of 8.9–10.2 cm (3½–4 in). (The viceroy butterfly is similar in color and pattern, but is markedly smaller, and has an extra black stripe across the hind wing.) The eastern North American monarch population is notable for its southward late summer/autumn migration from the United States and southern Canada to Mexico, covering thousands of miles. The western North American population of monarchs west of the Rocky Mountains most often migrate to sites in California but have been found in overwintering Mexico sites. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 129 Audiopedia
Phytochrome By Harisch
 
08:28
What is the Introduction,Structure, Forms of Phytochrome by Mr. Harisch.....!
Views: 731 HHH CREATION
Steven Reppert (UMass) Part 1: Neurobiology of Monarch Butterfly Migration: Migration Overview
 
28:10
https://www.ibiology.org/ecology/butterfly-migration/ Talk Overview: Reppert begins by describing the amazing long-distance migration of the Eastern North American Monarch butterfly. Each fall, several hundred million Monarchs fly up to 2500 miles from the eastern United States and southern Canada to a specific over-wintering area in central Mexico. How do the butterflies know when and where to fly? Reppert explains that the migration is directed largely by an innate sun compass. (In Part 1, the people who found the monarch over-wintering site were mistakenly identified as Ken and Karen Brugger. They were Ken and Catalina Brugger (now Catalina Trail).) In Part 2, Reppert focuses on the time-compensated sun compass system that guides the Monarch’s long migration. He describes how the butterfly eye can sense skylight cues used for directionality, including polarized UV light. This information is integrated in the central complex of the brain, which serves as the sun-compass, then is time compensated, and ultimately interacts with the motor system to control flight direction. While circadian clocks in the brain determine the seasonal migration of Monarchs, distinct circadian clocks in the antennae regulate time-compensation of the sun compass. Interestingly, work at the molecular level shows that the Monarch circadian clock mechanism is distinct and utilizes two cryptochrome (CRY) gene homologues; one previously found in Drosophila and one previously found in vertebrates. For more details of the monarch migration see http://reppertlab.org Speaker Biography: Steven Reppert received both his B.S. and M.D. degrees from the University of Nebraska. He did his clinical training in pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and was a post-doctoral fellow at the NIH in the Section on Neuroendocrinology. He then joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School where he resided for 22 years before moving in 2001 to chair the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. For the first 23 years of his research career, Reppert’s work primarily focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms of circadian clocks in mammals. Since 2002, his research has shifted to understanding the biological basis of the long-distance migration of the Monarch butterfly with a focus on its navigational abilities and the role of its unique circadian clock. Reppert’s pioneering research has been recognized with numerous awards including an NIH MERIT award, election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the G.J. Mendel Honorary Medal for Merit in the Biological Sciences from the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
Views: 9213 iBiology
PLANT STRESS PHYSIOLOGY (PART-2) || CSIR NET|| COLD STRESS/ LOW TEMPERATURE STRESS IN PLANTS
 
05:29
Stress in plants can be defined as any external factor that negatively influences plant growth, productivity, reproductive capacity or survival. Abiotic stress is defined as the negative impact of non-living factors on the living organisms in a specific environment. Example- light, temperature, water, salt,gravity and touch. #STRESSPHYSIOLOGY #TEMPERATURESTRESS #COLDSRESS #STRESSPHYSIOLOGYFORCSIRNET #COLDSTRESSINPLANTS HIGH TEMPERATURE STRESS IN PLANT-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/YoNgSOIsk0A AGROBACTERIUM MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER | CSIR NET | GATE | M.Sc. | B.Sc.| https://youtu.be/9pj_SRs2z58 More videos for CSIR NET. This channel will have the syllabus wise lectures Video for CSIR-NET-Lifescience/GATE-Lifescience/BARC/ICMR/ICAR. Island Biogeography theory(Ecology)-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/kK3kNOzHxMs Competitive Exclusion Principle (Ecology)-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/zV3LxYDz-qE ABC model of flower-for CSIR NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/Opkmx8xnQ94 Flower Development genes for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/fM8AIxZh7fM Island Biogeography theory-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/kK3kNOzHxMs Phototropin- FOR CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/GHyrQx04aCU CSIR-previous year solved questions on sensory photobiology https://youtu.be/vSBZZ4djf88 Phytochrome-for CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/AkRxzA6AbJI CRYPTOCHROME- For CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/cOOnt_hicFU Introduction to Evolution- For CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 For Knowing the Content of this channel https://youtu.be/SA_UVC4z-zQ Introduction of Evolution for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 thank you. LIKE SHARE and Subscribe for more such videos
Views: 513 TEACHING PATHSHALA
Steven Reppert (UMass) Part 2: Monarch Butterfly Migration: A Time-Compensated Sun Compass
 
46:55
https://www.ibiology.org/ecology/butterfly-migration/#part-2 Talk Overview: Reppert begins by describing the amazing long-distance migration of the Eastern North American Monarch butterfly. Each fall, several hundred million Monarchs fly up to 2500 miles from the eastern United States and southern Canada to a specific over-wintering area in central Mexico. How do the butterflies know when and where to fly? Reppert explains that the migration is directed largely by an innate sun compass. (In Part 1, the people who found the monarch over-wintering site were mistakenly identified as Ken and Karen Brugger. They were Ken and Catalina Brugger (now Catalina Trail).) In Part 2, Reppert focuses on the time-compensated sun compass system that guides the Monarch’s long migration. He describes how the butterfly eye can sense skylight cues used for directionality, including polarized UV light. This information is integrated in the central complex of the brain, which serves as the sun-compass, then is time compensated, and ultimately interacts with the motor system to control flight direction. While circadian clocks in the brain determine the seasonal migration of Monarchs, distinct circadian clocks in the antennae regulate time-compensation of the sun compass. Interestingly, work at the molecular level shows that the Monarch circadian clock mechanism is distinct and utilizes two cryptochrome (CRY) gene homologues; one previously found in Drosophila and one previously found in vertebrates. For more details of the monarch migration see http://reppertlab.org Speaker Biography: Steven Reppert received both his B.S. and M.D. degrees from the University of Nebraska. He did his clinical training in pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and was a post-doctoral fellow at the NIH in the Section on Neuroendocrinology. He then joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School where he resided for 22 years before moving in 2001 to chair the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. For the first 23 years of his research career, Reppert’s work primarily focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms of circadian clocks in mammals. Since 2002, his research has shifted to understanding the biological basis of the long-distance migration of the Monarch butterfly with a focus on its navigational abilities and the role of its unique circadian clock. Reppert’s pioneering research has been recognized with numerous awards including an NIH MERIT award, election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the G.J. Mendel Honorary Medal for Merit in the Biological Sciences from the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
Views: 3152 iBiology
BSSR Lecture Series: Regulation of the dopaminergic reward circuit and manic-like behavior
 
49:36
Speaker-McClung, Colleen A., National Institutes of Health (U.S.) Multiple studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are central to the development of mood and addiction disorders. However, the mechanisms by which circadian genes regulate mood and reward-related circuitry remains unclear. Our laboratory has found that mice with a mutation in the Clock gene (Clock∆19) have a complete behavioral profile that bears a striking resemblance to human mania (including hyperactivity, lowered levels of anxiety, increased preference and self-administration of drugs, and lowered levels of depression-related behavior) which can be reversed with chronic lithium treatment. Furthermore, the ClockΔ19 mice have an increase in dopaminergic activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) which is also normalized with lithium treatment. We have taken multiple approaches including RNA interference and optogenetics to better understand how CLOCK regulates dopaminergic activity and how this regulation is involved in the control of behavior. Moreover, in collaboration with Kafui Dzirasa and Miguel Nicolelis at Duke University, we found that the ClockΔ19 mice not only have increased dopaminergic activity, but also have a defect in the ability of neurons in the cortico-limbic circuit to synchronize firing while animals are exploring specific tasks. Thus the CLOCK protein is not only involved in controlling rhythms over the course of 24 hrs, but is also involved in the synchronization of activity between brain regions over short periods of time. CLOCK functions as a transcription factor and we have identified direct target genes that control dopaminergic activity which appear to be important in the reversal of phenotypes by lithium. Taken together, these results begin to show the mechanisms by which circadian genes regulate mood and reward, and suggest novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of mania and addictive disorders.
Views: 2634 NIHOD
magnetic feild did we use to see them science today
 
00:11
https://www.ebay.com/str/hutchisoneffect HELP SUPPORT FUNDING LINKS BELOW https://www.paypal.me/JHUTCHISON612 Birds are able to navigate their way across thousands of kilometres to precisely the same spot year after year, thanks to their ability to perceive Earth's magnetic fields - a sense known as magnetoreception. Now researchers have shown that the eyes of dogs, certain primates, and bears contain the same molecule thought to be responsible for this ability in birds, suggesting that these mammals might be able to do the same thing. The molecule believed to be responsible for this 'sixth sense' - one that humans have unfortunately lost - is known as cryptochrome 1a, and it's part of the group of light-sensing molecules that help bacteria, plants, and mammals to regulate their circadian rhythms. Although certain mammals, such as bats and mole rats, are believed to sense magnetic fields (as displayed by their fancy navigational abilities) until now, no one has studied the presence of the magnoreception molecule in mammals. Now a team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute in Germany has shown for the first time that a mammalian version of this molecule, which they're simply calling cryptochrome 1, is present in the retinas of dog-like carnivores, such as dogs, wolves, bears, foxes, and badgers. It was also present in the retinas of certain primates, including orangutans and some macaque species. To be clear, simply having cryptochrome 1 doesn't necessarily mean that these animals are able to perceive magnetic fields like birds do - the molecule could be playing some other type of role in their eyes. But the researchers have good reason to suggest that its presence is a sign of magnetoreception. For starters, the cryptochrome 1 they found was located in the outer segments of the mammals' blue- to UV-sensitive cone photoreceptors. Why is that important? Because that's the same place the molecule is found in birds. From there, it's believed that cryptochrome 1a is activated by magnetic fields, which sets off a chain reaction that allows the animals to detect them. This process is pretty complicated - and, fascinatingly, involves quantum mechanics - but the short story is that the cryptochrome 1 in mammals is exactly where you'd expect it to be to detect magnetic fields. Secondly, based on its location at the edge of the mammals' cone cells, it was unlikely that it controls the circadian rhythm or acts as a visual pigment for colour perception, the researchers report. "Therefore, it is possible that these animals also have a magnetic sense that is linked to their visual system," the researchers conclude in Nature Scientific Reports. So assuming that's true, what are these species using the ability for? That's not clear just yet, but it's well known that dogs prefer to poop along a north-south axis, and they're not the only ones that show some magnetic preference. "When hunting, foxes are more successful at catching mice when they pounce on them in a northeast direction," George Dvorsky adds over at Gizmodo. "For primates, this built-in compass may help with bodily orientation, or it could be a vestigial evolutionary trait that’s largely unused." The big surprise for the researchers was the fact that, out of 90 mammalian species examined, only a few contained cryptochrome 1 - and this didn't include mammals known to navigate using magnetic fields, such as mice and bats. But those mammals might navigate a different way, the researchers suggest, for example, by using magnetite - tiny ferrous particles found in cells that work sort of like a pocket compass. Birds also use these to figure out where they are. The researchers now need to work out whether or not dogs, bears, and the primate species really are using the magnetoreception powers of cyrptochrome 1, or whether the molecule serves some other purpose in their eyes. Either way, it's pretty fascinating to think that primate ancestors of ours, no matter how distant, might still have the ability to perceive the magnetic fields that have long been invisible to us. We're kinda jealous. https://www.gofundme.com/help-needed-videos-and-documents https://www.gofundme.com/hutchison-effect-energy https://www.gofundme.com/hutchison-effect-energy http://www.dailymotion.com/johnkhutchison1 my ebay methttps://www.ebay.com/usr/johnkhutchisonal samples and other things https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076M8PRR1/ https://vimeo.com/38622880
Views: 265 John Hutchison
Resonance   Beings of Frequency documentary film
 
01:28:27
A well-researched, well-made, deeply disturbing documentary. From the source description: (Full Film) RESONANCE ➜ This James Russell film is a Sensational Eye Opening Documentary that examines 60 years of scientific research! ➜ Join the FACEBOOK page http://goo.gl/yf4Qs ➜ James Russell (Director + Producer) james(at)flatfrogfilms(dot)com http://www.FlatFrogFilms.com ➜ John Webster (Director) http://www.PatientZeroProductions.com This spectacular documentary uncovers for the very first time, the actual mechanisms by which mobile phone technology can cause cancer. And, how every single one of us is reacting to the biggest change in environment this planet has ever seen. Two billion years ago life first arrived on this planet; a planet, which was filled with a natural frequency. As life slowly evolved, it did so surrounded by this frequency. and Inevitably, it began tuning in. By the time mankind arrived on earth an incredible relationship had been struck; a relationship that science is just beginning to comprehend. Research is showing that being exposed to this frequency is absolutely integral to us. It controls our mental and physical health, it synchronizes our circadian rhythms, and it aids our immune system and improves our sense of wellbeing. Not only are we surrounded by natural frequencies, our bodies are filled with them too. Our cells communicate using electro magnetic frequencies. Our brain emits a constant stream of frequencies and our DNA delivers instructions, using frequency waves. Without them we couldn't exist for more than a second. This delicate balance has taken billions of years to perfect. But over the last 25 years the harmony has been disturbed. and disturbed dramatically. Mankind has submerged itself in an ocean of artificial frequencies. They are all around us, filling the air and drowning out the earth's natural resonance. To the naked eye the planet appears to be the same. But at a cellular level it is the biggest change that life on earth has endured; the affects of which we are just starting to see and feel. Originally sourced from AscendedVitality at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vb9R0x_0NQ - More info there
Views: 76288 mooveegee
What Is The Definition Of Flavoproteins - Medical Dictionary Free Online
 
00:57
Visit our website for text version of this Definition and app download. http://www.medicaldictionaryapps.com Subjects: medical terminology, medical dictionary, medical dictionary free download, medical terminology made easy, medical terminology song
This Quantum ‘Sixth Sense’ Could Allow Birds to Navigate Earth’s Magnetic Field
 
03:40
How do migrating birds know where to go? New research suggests “spooky action at a distance” might be involved. We’ve Ignored Climate Change For More Than a Century - https://youtu.be/LKhGg0jDZTc Read More: Migratory birds eye-localized magnetoreception for navigation https://phys.org/news/2018-02-migratory-birds-eye-localized-magnetoreception.html “Migratory birds use a magnetic compass in their eye for navigation. The involved sensory mechanisms have long remained elusive, but now, researchers have revealed exactly where in the eye avian navigation is situated.” Billions of Birds Migrate: Where Do They Go? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/03/bird-migration-interactive-maps/ “ Migratory birds have made their thousand-mile flights for millennia, but we are just now learning to map their mesmerizing journeys.” Why Do Birds Migrate? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302082310.htm “One textbook explanation suggests either eating fruit or living in non-forested environments were the precursors needed to evolve migratory behavior. Not so, report a pair of ecologists from The University of Arizona in Tucson. The pressure to migrate comes from seasonal food scarcity.” ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Special thanks to Amy Shira Teitel for writing this episode of Seeker! Check Amy out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/astVintageSpace This episode of Seeker was hosted by Trace Dominguez
Views: 89200 Seeker
How to Pronounce Cryptochromes
 
00:29
This video shows you how to pronounce Cryptochromes
Photochromes & Mechanism of interconversion
 
10:43
Photochromes Mechanism of interconversion F.Sc II (Biology) Chapter 18 Reproduction