Home
Search results “Cut and fill mining losses at gettysburg”
Gettysburg Artifacts "If These Things Could Talk" (Lecture)
 
01:09:44
Gettysburg National Military Park Ranger Tom Holbrook puts on his white gloves and tells the story of a number of Civil War artifacts circa 1865. Descendants of the owner of one particular artifact, a canteen with a note attached, are present in the audience for this winter lecture at the Gettysburg Museum and Visitors Center.
Views: 61698 GettysburgNPS
2018 Winter Lecture Series - “A Great Weight at My Heart”: The Army of the Potomac after Gettysburg
 
47:46
This presentation, “A Great Weight at My Heart”: The Army of the Potomac after Gettysburg, describes what happened to the Army of the Potomac after the three day battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
Views: 4977 GettysburgNPS
Sherman's Armies in South Carolina (Lecture)
 
01:27:18
National Park Service Ranger Bert Barnett follows the path of General William T. Sherman as his armies move through South Carolina in 1865.
Views: 42743 GettysburgNPS
The Irish Brigade - Ranger Angie Atkinson
 
46:02
Join Supervisory Park Ranger Angie Atkinson for a look at one of the more famous units to see action during the American Civil War, the Irish Brigade. From the Sunken Road at Antietam to the Bloody Wheatfield at Gettysburg, Angie describes the history and significance of this storied group of American soldiers.
Views: 23309 GettysburgNPS
2018 Winter Lecture Series - “The movement was south.” General Grant and the Overland Campaign
 
50:22
Ulysses S. Grant was chosen by President Abraham Lincoln to lead all military forces in 1864 to finally put an end to the fighting during the Civil War. Grant's Overland Campaign against Robert E. Lee would be a turning point in the war and one that Lee could not ultimately match.
Views: 7257 GettysburgNPS
FULL DOCUMENTARY: Mississippi's War: Slavery and Secession | MPB
 
58:34
State’s Rights vs Slavery? What was the motivating factor that lead to the conflict? Examine the reasons behind Mississippi’s decision to secede from the United States, and the ramifications that action had on its citizens. Learn more at http://www.mpbonline.org/mississippiswar
19. To Appomattox and Beyond: The End of the War and a Search for Meanings
 
51:12
The Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST 119) Professor Blight uses Herman Melville's poem "On the Slain Collegians" to introduce the horrifying slaughter of 1864. The architect of the strategy that would eventually lead to Union victory, but at a staggering human cost, was Ulysses S. Grant, brought East to assume control of all Union armies in 1864. Professor Blight narrates the campaigns of 1864, including the Battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, and the siege of Petersburg. While Robert E. Lee battled Grant to a stalemate in Virginia, however, William Tecumseh Sherman's Union forces took Atlanta before beginning their March to the Sea, destroying Confederate morale and fighting power from the inside. Professor Blight closes his lecture with a description of the first Memorial Day, celebrated by African Americans in Charleston, SC 1865. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Melville's "On the Slain Collegians" 05:21 - Chapter 2. Grant's Strategic Changes from the West to the East 13:26 - Chapter 3. The Psyche of Robert E. Lee 19:17 - Chapter 4. Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Crater: Grant and Lee in 1864 33:21 - Chapter 5. Sherman's March to the Sea 42:23 - Chapter 6. The Beginning of Memorial Day and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.
Views: 50092 YaleCourses
Commencement 2019 - Full Ceremony
 
02:42:21
Gettysburg College Class of 2019 full commencement ceremony.
Views: 309 Gettysburg College
End of the Civil War Book Fair, Part 3: Their Last Full Measure: The Final Days of the Civil War
 
49:10
2:00pm Historian Joseph Wheelan relates the dramatic events which followed one after another, leading ultimately to Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and Lincoln’s assassination. A book signing follows the discussion. To access live, real-time captioning, please click on the link below or insert the following URL into a separate browser window: http://www.streamtext.net/text.aspx?event=041815nara1100am
Views: 1630 US National Archives
Civil War Homecoming
 
01:56:47
The year 1865 saw inauguration, abolition, armistice, assassination, grief, celebration, and reunion. The brand new state of Minnesota mourned and commemorated along with the rest of the nation. A live stage show featuring Dan Chouinard, Beth Gilleland, Dane Stauffer, Kevin Kling, Maria Jette, T. Mychael Rambo, Prudence Johnson, members of the Roe Family Singers, and the Brass Messengers as well as Eric Jacobson, Annette Atkins, Gwen Westerman, Mark Ritchie, Dean Urdahl, Patricia Bauer, and David Geister. ACT I 0:00:00 Opening sequence: Randal Dietrich & Stephen Smith 0:01:20 Music: The Vacant Chair 0:04:00 Welcome: Dan Chouinard 0:05:30 Lincoln’s 2nd Inaugural (part 1 of 2): Dean Urdahl 0:07:30 Music: Weeping Sad & Lonely 0:10:00 Civil War literature: Dan Chouinard 0:10:30 Bowlers: Beth Gilleland & Dane Stauffer 0:13:25 Christie Brothers: Mark Ritchie & Kevin Kling 0:16:00 1861-1864: Eric Jacobson 0:23:00 Gettysburg: Kevin Kling 0:27:30 Music: Brother Green 0:29:30 Civil War Music: Dan Chouinard 0:31:30 Music: Battle Cry of Freedom 0:32:20 1865: Dan Chouinard 0:32:50 Music: Home for Me 0:35:50 13th Amendment: Dan Chouinard 0:38:40 Lincoln’s 2nd Inaugural (part 2 of 2): Dean Urdahl 0:40:20 Frederick Douglass: T. Mychael Rambo 0:42:00 Music: True Lover’s Fairwell 0:42:45 Bowlers: Beth Gilleland & Dane Stauffer 0:46:20 Lee’s Surrender/Fall of Richmond: Pat Bauer 0:47:15 Music: Dixie 0:48:00 Lincoln’s assassination: Dan Chouinard 0:51:50 LeDuc: Pat Bauer & David Geister 0:53:17 Funeral Train: Dan Chouinard 0:56:00 Grand Review: Dan Chouinard 0:56:50 Christie Brothers: Mark Ritchie & Kevin Kling 0:58:50 Music: Down by the Riverside 1:00:55 Intermission: Stephen Smith, Shari Lamke, Randal Dietrich ACT II 1:02:00 Shall We Gather At the River 1:03:40 Homecomings: Mark Ritchie & Kevin Kling & Dan Chouinard 1:07:05 Music: Home Sweet Home 1:08:30 Music: Maiden in the Garden 1:10:45 Civil War Veterans: Dan Chouinard 1:12:30 Bowlers: Beth Gilleland & Dane Stauffer 1:14:45 MN & the Civil War: Annette Atkins 1:19:30 Blacks in MN: Dan Chouinard & T. Mychael Rambo 1:22:00 Music: I’ll Overcome Someday 1:25:00 Native People: Gwen Westerman 1:31:45 War’s Legacy: Eric Jacobson 1:38:50 Litany of stories 1:44:50 Angel Band 1:47:20 Civil War in our Midst 1:52:20 Music: Jacob’s Ladder 1:55:40 Closing Comments & Credits
Views: 960 minnesotahistory
Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America
 
01:13:47
Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America In his new biography, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner T. J. Stiles radically changes our view of Gen. George Armstrong Custer and his turbulent times. Stiles paints a portrait of Custer both deeply personal and sweeping in scope, proving how much of Custer’s legacy has been ignored. A book signing follows the program.
Views: 7533 US National Archives
Legacies of Letterman: The Army Medical Corps, 1864-1945 (Lecture)
 
01:03:49
Education Specialist Barb Sanders explores advancements in military medicine from the end of the Civil War to World War II. From the system of triage, evacuation and hospital care instituted by Medical Director Jonathan Letterman, through both the First and Second World Wars, the medical advances of the Civil War ultimately resulted in the advent of penicillin, blood collection, aeromedical evacuation and the treatment of psychiatric casualties.
Views: 1693 GettysburgNPS
How to Ask Forrest Fenn a Question
 
02:14:33
Join "A Gypsy's Kiss" as they tell you about their search for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, New Mexico in 2010 and described in his first memoir, "The Thrill of the Chase." #forrestfenn #fenntreasure #agypsyskiss
Views: 2407 A Gypsy's Kiss
ch 10) The Other Civil War
 
01:51:14
chapter 10: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 10, "The Other Civil War", covers the Anti-Rent movement, the Dorr Rebellion, the Flour Riot of 1837, the Molly Maguires, the rise of labor unions, the Lowell girls movement, and other class struggles centered around the various depressions of the 19th century. He describes the abuse of government power by corporations and the efforts by workers to resist those abuses.
Views: 10776 andi burridge
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Audiobook by Harriet Jacobs | Audiobook with subtitles
 
07:41:17
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself Harriet JACOBS Harriet Jacobs' autobiography, written under the pseudonym Linda Brent, details her experiences as a slave in North Carolina, her escape to freedom in the north, and her ensuing struggles to free her children. The narrative was partly serialized in the New York Tribune, but was discontinued because Jacobs' depictions of the sexual abuse of female slaves were considered too shocking. It was published in book form in 1861. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett). Genre(s): Memoirs Our Custom URL : https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks Subscribe To Our Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks?sub_confirmation=1 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself Harriet JACOBS Harriet Jacobs' autobiography, written under the pseudonym Linda Brent, details her experiences as a slave in North Carolina, her escape to freedom in the north, and her ensuing struggles to free her children. The narrative was partly serialized in the New York Tribune, but was discontinued because Jacobs' depictions of the sexual abuse of female slaves were considered too shocking. It was published in book form in 1861. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett). Genre(s): Memoirs Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
Views: 1012 Audio book Audiobooks
Democracy's Greatest Leaders - Lincoln & Chuchill
 
01:07:07
The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies Presents: Democracy's Greatest Leaders - Abraham Lincoln & Winston Churchill by Presidential Historian, and Hauenstein Center Director, Gleaves Whitney
Views: 8269 GVSU
Joseph Devlin - How to Speak and Write Correctly -  HQ - FULL AudioBook - Subtitles
 
05:43:03
📥 Download: 📗 Epub :http://www.loyalbooks.com/download/epub/How-to-Speak-and-Write-Correctly-by-Joseph-Devlin.epub 📘 Mobi (Kindle) :http://www.loyalbooks.com/download/mobi/How-to-Speak-and-Write-Correctly-by-Joseph-Devlin.mobi 📄 Text :http://www.loyalbooks.com/download/text/How-to-Speak-and-Write-Correctly-by-Joseph-Devlin.txt 📌 Chapter: ▫️ Chapter 00 : Introduction 00:00:00 ▫️ Chapter 01 : Requirements of Speech 00:02:31 ▫️ Chapter 02 : Essentials of English Gra 00:15:14 ▫️ Chapter 03 : The Sentence 00:56:01 ▫️ Chapter 04 : Figurative Language 01:25:21 ▫️ Chapter 05 : Punctuation 01:42:55 ▫️ Chapter 06 : Letter Writing 02:16:06 ▫️ Chapter 07 : Errors 02:42:38 ▫️ Chapter 08 : Pitfalls to Avoid 03:09:16 ▫️ Chapter 09 : Style 03:46:37 ▫️ Chapter 10 : Suggestions 04:14:21 ▫️ Chapter 11 : Slang 04:32:56 ▫️ Chapter 12 : Writing for Newspapers 04:50:33 ▫️ Chapter 13 : Choice of Words 05:09:33 ▫️ Chapter 14 : English Language 05:23:07 ▫️ Chapter 15 : Masters and Masterpieces 05:37:29 📝 Synopsis: A book on improving eloquence, proficiency and grammar in everyday communication. ‘How to Speak and Write Correctly’ is not a manual of the styles to use in speaking and writing, nor is it a manual for grammar. It is a simple, useful book for helping ordinary people in effective communication. It lays down and explains broad rules of communication, further giving useful tips for effective communication. The book also lists common mistakes in communication and offers suggestions on how best to avoid them. The book covers the requirements of speech with the three essentials being purity, Propriety and precision. It then looks at the essentials of English grammar by looking at the divisions of grammar and how they make or break effective communication. Next, the sentence is broken down into its constituent pieces and the structure is explained so that the reader knows how to construct coherent sentences. The book also discusses how to use figurative language to convey meaning in a vivid and impressive manner. The book then delves into punctuation, highlighting some of the common misuses and how to correct them. Those that still revere the art of letter writing will not be disappointed because the book has tips and tricks on writing letters for whatever purpose. A few chapters have been dedicated to errors made by authors ever so often and how to correct them. The book also explores style and how a writer can nurture his own style in order to express himself and appeal to his audience. There are many interesting points that are highlighted in this book and readers will find ‘How to Speak and Write Correctly’ a pleasant read for both those new in the language as well as seasoned English speakers.
Views: 197 BOOKODIO
Orchard Revolution, FULL MOVIE
 
01:30:06
The news media is constantly reporting on the demise of America. They report on major problems like obesity, diabetes, and environmental pollution. Yet the news media rarely reports on the stories of hope, the stories of Americans taking action to overcome these problems. Director Matt Byron is sick and tired of the news media's fear mongering. He sets out to find stories of hope. He searches for people who are taking action to overcome America's human health and environmental health crises. Please support our film and watch in high definition at: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/orchardrevolution We hope you enjoy the film and we hope it inspires you to plant 5 fruit trees!
Views: 1242 Orchard Revolution
2018 Ideas Conference - Full Event
 
08:06:36
For the past 15 years, the Center for American Progress has served as a creative engine for introducing bold solutions that advance progressive values on nearly every possible front. In the past year alone, we have defended the Affordable Care Act; outlined policies to create workplaces that support women and families; discussed the impact of race across a wide range of issue areas; and helped drive opposition to President Donald Trump’s tax plan. At CAP, we believe that ideas are the heart of all progressive change, but we also know that ideas aren’t enough. It takes grassroots advocacy and real leadership supporting those ideas to create true progressive change. As we celebrate our 15th year of big ideas, CAP is bringing together elected officials, policy experts, cultural influencers, and grassroots activists at the 2018 CAP Ideas Conference, where we will explore and unveil new ideas that can make America a place for every single one of us to thrive. SPEAKERS INCLUDE: ` SEN. CORY BOOKER | (D-NJ) SEN. SHERROD BROWN | (D-OH) JULIÁN CASTRO | Former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development MAYOR BILL DE BLASIO | New York, NY RYAN DEITSCH | Activist and Student, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School SEN. KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND | (D-NY) FATIMA GOSS GRAVES | President and CEO, National Women’s Law Center GOV. JAY INSLEE | (D-WA) SEN. DOUG JONES | (D-AL) REP. JOSEPH KENNEDY III | (D-MA) SEN. AMY KLOBUCHAR | (D-MN) PAUL KRUGMAN | Economist, Nobel laureate MARIA TERESA KUMAR | President and CEO, Voto Latino REP. TED LIEU | (D-CA) SARAH MCBRIDE | Author and National Press Secretary, Human Rights Campaign SEN. CHRIS MURPHY | (D-CT) GOV. PHIL MURPHY | (D-NJ) DEJUAN PATTERSON | Founding Partner/CEO, The BeMore Group CECILE RICHARDS | President, Planned Parenthood Federation of America SEN. BERNIE SANDERS | (I-VT) REP. TERRI SEWELL | (D-AL) SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN | (D-MA) SALLY YATES | Former acting U.S. Attorney General
Views: 6696 seeprogress
Conquest Over Time by Michael Shaara
 
01:18:29
Pat Travis, a spacer renowned for his luck, is suddenly quite out of it. His job is to beat his competitors to sign newly-Contacted human races to commercial contracts... But what can he do when he finds he's on a planet that consults astrology for literally every major decision - and he has arrived on one of the worst-aspected days in history?
Views: 1147 Audiobooks Unleashed
Philosophies of Diversity: Multiplying, Intersecting, Pluralizing and Planetizing the Love of Wisdom
 
01:51:50
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness Forum are co-sponsoring this panel discussion focused on the importance of diversifying philosophy and on various ways that diversity can be theorized and practiced. Panel participants include Sara Acevedo, Drew Dellinger, Lilly Falconer, and Matt Segall. The panel will be moderated by Felipe Restrepo.
History of the United States (1849–1865) | Wikipedia audio article
 
50:20
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States (1849–1865) 00:02:34 1 Economic and cultural changes 00:02:44 1.1 Developing a Market Economy 00:06:15 1.2 Immigration and Labor 00:08:31 2 Political upheaval 00:08:41 2.1 Wilmot Proviso 00:09:34 2.2 The Popular Sovereignty Debate 00:10:56 2.3 California Gold Rush 00:12:09 2.4 Compromise of 1850 00:13:30 2.5 Antislavery and abolitionism 00:16:05 2.6 Kansas–Nebraska Act 00:17:51 2.7 Bleeding Kansas 00:19:24 2.8 The new Republican Party 00:20:22 2.9 Election of 1856 00:22:37 2.10 Dred Scott decision 00:24:13 2.11 Lincoln-Douglas debates 00:26:29 2.12 John Brown's raid 00:28:08 2.13 Election of 1860 00:29:45 2.14 Secession 00:30:50 3 Civil War 00:33:18 3.1 War in the East 00:36:43 3.2 War in the West 00:37:42 3.3 End of the Confederacy 00:38:47 3.4 Home fronts 00:38:56 3.4.1 United States 00:41:33 3.4.2 Confederate States 00:43:50 3.5 Assassination of Abraham Lincoln 00:44:42 4 See also 00:45:23 5 Notes 00:45:32 6 Further reading 00:49:56 7 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Industrialization went forward in the Northwest. A rail network and a telegraph network linked the nation economically, opening up new markets. Immigration brought millions of European workers and farmers to the North. In the South, planters shifted operations (and slaves) from the poor soils of the Southeast to the rich cotton lands of the Southwest. Issues of slavery in the new territories acquired in the War with Mexico (which ended in 1848) were temporarily resolved by the Compromise of 1850. One provision, the Fugitive Slave Law, sparked intense controversy, as revealed in the enormous interest in the plight of the escaped slave in Uncle Tom's Cabin, an anti-slavery novel and play. In 1854, the Kansas–Nebraska Act reversed long-standing compromises by providing that each new state of the Union would decide its posture on slavery. The newly formed Republican Party stood against the expansion of slavery and won control of most northern states (with enough electoral votes to win the presidency in 1860). The invasion of Bloody Kansas by pro- and anti-slavery factions intent on voting slavery up or down, with resulting bloodshed, angered both North and South. The Supreme Court tried to resolve the issue of slavery in the territories with a pro-slavery ruling in Dred Scott v. Sandford that angered the North. After the 1860 election of Republican Abraham Lincoln, seven Southern states declared their secession from the United States between late 1860 and 1861, establishing a rebel government, the Confederate States of America on February 9, 1861. The Civil War began when Confederate General Pierre Beauregard opened fire upon Union troops at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. Four more states seceded as Lincoln called for troops to fight an insurrection. The next four years were the darkest in American history as the nation tore at itself using the latest military technology and highly motivated soldiers. The urban, industrialized Northern states (the Union) eventually defeated the mainly rural, agricultural Southern states (the Confederacy), but between 600,000 and 700,000 American soldiers (on both sides combined) were killed, and much of the infrastructure of the South was devastated. About 8% of all white males aged 13 to 43 died in the war, including 6% in the North and an extraordinary 18% in the South. In the end, slavery was abolished, and the Union was restored, richer and more powerful than ever, while the South was embittered and impoverished.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Emancipation Proclamation | Wikipedia audio article
 
55:33
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Emancipation Proclamation 00:05:00 1 Authority 00:08:02 2 Coverage 00:11:11 3 Background 00:11:20 3.1 Military action prior to emancipation 00:12:10 3.2 Governmental action towards emancipation 00:14:45 3.3 Public opinion of emancipation 00:19:46 4 Drafting and issuance of the proclamation 00:24:46 5 Implementation 00:26:27 5.1 Immediate impact 00:31:21 5.2 Political impact 00:35:29 5.2.1 Confederate response 00:37:47 5.3 International impact 00:39:30 6 Gettysburg Address 00:40:02 7 Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction (1863) 00:40:37 8 Postbellum 00:42:10 9 Critiques 00:44:18 10 Legacy in the civil rights era 00:44:28 10.1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 00:46:29 10.1.1 The "Second Emancipation Proclamation" 00:47:01 10.2 President John F. Kennedy 00:48:17 10.3 President Lyndon B. Johnson 00:50:58 11 In popular culture 00:52:06 12 See also 00:53:14 13 Notes 00:53:23 13.1 Primary sources 00:53:32 14 Further reading 00:53:41 15 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. It changed the federal legal status of more than 3.5 million enslaved African Americans in the designated areas of the South from slave to free. As soon as a slave escaped the control of the Confederate government, by running away or through advances of federal troops, the former slave became free. Ultimately, the rebel surrender liberated and resulted in the proclamation's application to all of the designated former slaves. It did not cover slaves in Union areas that were freed by state action (or three years later by the 13th amendment in December 1865). It was issued as a war measure during the American Civil War, directed to all of the areas in rebellion and all segments of the executive branch (including the Army and Navy) of the United States.The Proclamation ordered the freedom of all slaves in ten states. Because it was issued under the president's authority to suppress rebellion (war powers), it necessarily excluded areas not in rebellion, but still applied to more than 3.5 million of the 4 million slaves. The Proclamation was based on the president's constitutional authority as commander in chief of the armed forces; it was not a law passed by Congress. The Proclamation was issued in January 1863 after U.S government issued a series of warnings in the summer of 1862 under the Second Confiscation Act, allowing Southern Confederate supporters 60 days to surrender, or face confiscation of land and slaves. The Proclamation also ordered that suitable persons among those freed could be enrolled into the paid service of United States' forces, and ordered the Union Army (and all segments of the Executive branch) to "recognize and maintain the freedom of" the ex-slaves. The Proclamation did not compensate the owners, did not outlaw slavery, and did not grant citizenship to the ex-slaves (called freedmen). It made the eradication of slavery an explicit war goal, in addition to the goal of reuniting the Union.Around 25,000 to 75,000 slaves in regions where the US Army was active were immediately emancipated. It could not be enforced in areas still under rebellion, but, as the Union army took control of Confederate regions, the Proclamation provided the legal framework for freeing more than three and a half million slaves in those regions. Prior to the Proclamation, in accordance with the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, escaped slaves were either returned to their masters or held in camps as contraband for later return. The Proclamation applied only to slaves in Confederate-held lands; it did not apply to those in the four slave states that were not in rebellion (Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri, which were unnamed), nor to Tennessee (unnamed but occupied by Union troops since 1862) and lower Louisiana (also under occupation), and specifically excluded those ...
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Wilbur Haines
 
01:39:55
Wilbur served in the U.S. Army and shares remarkable stories of his experience in the military.
Views: 63 CCHistory Project
Siege of Petersburg | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:10:11
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Siege of Petersburg 00:01:30 1 Background 00:01:39 1.1 Military situation 00:06:37 2 Opposing forces 00:06:46 2.1 Union 00:10:00 2.2 Confederate 00:11:59 2.3 Comparison between Union and Confederate armies 00:13:21 2.4 Role of African Americans 00:13:48 3 Initial attempts to capture Petersburg 00:13:59 3.1 Butler's assault (June 9) 00:17:06 3.2 Meade's assaults (June 15–18,1864) 00:24:09 4 Initial attempts to cut the railroads (June 21–30) 00:25:05 4.1 Jerusalem Plank Road (June 21–23) 00:27:26 4.2 Wilson-Kautz Raid (June 22 – July 1) 00:33:59 5 First Battle of Deep Bottom (July 27–29) 00:37:01 6 The Crater (July 30) 00:41:42 7 Second Deep Bottom (August 14–20) 00:45:52 8 Operations against the Weldon Railroad 00:46:02 8.1 Globe Tavern (August 18–21) 00:49:18 8.2 Second Reams Station (August 25) 00:53:16 9 Beefsteak Raid (September 14–17) 00:55:25 10 Union offensives, late September 00:55:35 10.1 New Market Heights (September 29–30) 00:56:23 10.2 Peebles Farm (September 30 – October 2) 00:57:39 11 Actions near Richmond, October 00:57:49 11.1 Darbytown and New Market Roads (October 7) 00:58:26 11.2 Darbytown Road (October 13) 00:58:57 11.3 Fair Oaks and Darbytown Road (October 27–28) 00:59:37 12 Boydton Plank Road (October 27–28) 01:00:31 13 Hatcher's Run (February 5–7, 1865) 01:01:46 14 Confederate breakout attempt at Fort Stedman (March 25) 01:05:55 15 Aftermath 01:07:41 16 Classifying the campaigns 01:08:30 17 Battlefield preservation 01:09:42 18 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Richmond–Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War. Although it is more popularly known as the Siege of Petersburg, it was not a classic military siege, in which a city is usually surrounded and all supply lines are cut off, nor was it strictly limited to actions against Petersburg. The campaign consisted of nine months of trench warfare in which Union forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant assaulted Petersburg unsuccessfully and then constructed trench lines that eventually extended over 30 miles (48 km) from the eastern outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, to around the eastern and southern outskirts of Petersburg. Petersburg was crucial to the supply of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's army and the Confederate capital of Richmond. Numerous raids were conducted and battles fought in attempts to cut off the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. Many of these battles caused the lengthening of the trench lines. Lee finally gave in to the pressure and abandoned both cities in April 1865, leading to his retreat and surrender at Appomattox Court House. The Siege of Petersburg foreshadowed the trench warfare that was common in World War I, earning it a prominent position in military history. It also featured the war's largest concentration of African American troops, who suffered heavy casualties at such engagements as the Battle of the Crater and Chaffin's Farm.
Views: 23 wikipedia tts
Winter Commencment, Dec. 20, 2013, 10 a.m.
 
01:06:06
Towson University Winter Commencement, College of Health Professions, College of Liberal Arts, December 20, 2013, 10 a.m., SECU Arena. Students receiving diplomas have been edited from this video. A professional DVD of the full ceremony is available to purchase from Northeast Photo Network (1-800-929-7427).
Views: 361 Towson University
City Council 7:23:18
 
02:02:53
CITY OF EUREKA SPRINGS COUNCIL MEETING Monday, July 23, 2018 6 p.m. AGENDA CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL, ESTABLISH QUORUM PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES: July 9, 2018 COMMISSION, COMMITTEE, AUTHORITY REPORTS AND EXPIRED TERMS: Planning – Pos. 3 – vacant – expires 7/1/20. Pos. 5 – vacant – expires 1/1/19 CAPC – Pos. 2 – expired 6/30/18. Pos. 7 – expired 6/30/18 – Application for renewing from Carol Wright Hospital – Pos. 7 – vacant – expires 9/7/20 Parks HDC – Pos. 6 – vacant – expires 3/7/20 – vote on application from Margaret (Magi) Hayde Cemetery – Pos. 1 – vacant -- expires 2/15/21. Pos. 2 – vacant – expires 2/15/21. PUBLIC COMMENTS -- 3 minutes for each citizen UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. Ordinance No. 2269 Amending Adoption of Plans – 3rd reading 2. Ordinance No. 2270 Amending R-1 Victorian residential – w/Planning’s amendments 3. Ordinance No. 2271 Amending C-1, C-2 and C-3 – 3rd reading 4. Ordinance No. 2272 Amending Planned Unit Development – w/Planning’s amendments 5. Fifth ordinance from Planning re: Amending R-2 Contemporary residential – w/Planning’s amendments 6. Update on Auditorium remodel – Mr. Thomas and Ms. Greene – August 13 NEW BUSINESS: 1. Quit Claim Deeds – Parks Commission 2. Discussion of adjusting the Public Works budget – Ms. Kendrick and Mr. Thomas 3. Discussion of downtown curb cuts – Mr. Mitchell and Ms. Schneider AGENDA SETTING CITY COUNCIL COMMENTS MAYOR’S COMMENTS ADJOURNMENT
Senate Session 2012-05-17 (13:53:31-14:56:24)
 
01:02:54
Begin consideration of the motion to proceed to S 3187, the FDA user fee reauthorization bill. At 10:30am, the Senate will turn to executive session to consider the following two nominations to the Federal Reserve under an agreement that allows for up to 90 mins of debate on the nominations concurrently: 1.) Jeremy Stein of MA to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve; and 2.) Jerome Powell of MD to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.
Views: 269 CSPANSenate2012
SUNY Purchase College Commencement 2013
 
02:50:19
Friday, May 17th, 2013, 12:30 P.M. Westchester County Center
Views: 1825 PurchaseCollege
Confederate States of America | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:14:48
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Confederate States of America Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy and the South, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, whose economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.Each state declared its secession from the United States, which became known as the Union during the ensuing civil war, following the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories. Before Lincoln took office in March, a new Confederate government was established in February 1861, which was considered illegal by the government of the United States. States volunteered militia units and the new government hastened to form its own Confederate States Army from scratch practically overnight. After the American Civil War began in April, four slave states of the Upper South—Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina—also declared their secession and joined the Confederacy. The Confederacy later accepted Missouri and Kentucky as members, although neither officially declared secession nor were they ever largely controlled by Confederate forces; Confederate shadow governments attempted to control the two states but were later exiled from them. The government of the United States (the Union) rejected the claims of secession and considered the Confederacy illegally founded. The War began with the Confederate attack upon Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, a Union fort in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. No foreign government officially recognized the Confederacy as an independent country, although Great Britain and France granted it belligerent status, which allowed Confederate agents to contract with private concerns for arms and other supplies. In early 1865, after four years of heavy fighting which led to 620,000–850,000 military deaths, all the Confederate forces surrendered and the Confederacy vanished. The war lacked a formal end; nearly all Confederate forces had been forced into surrender or deliberately disbanded by the end of 1865, by which point the dwindling manpower and resources of the Confederacy were facing overwhelming odds. By 1865, Jefferson Davis lamented that the Confederacy had "disappeared".
Views: 74 wikipedia tts
HSN | Connected Life with Brett Chukerman 01.03.2018 - 07 PM
 
01:00:01
Shop Connected Life on HSN.com https://goo.gl/ihbYFU .Brett makes living connected easy with innovative technology and meaningful motivation.Prices shown on the previously recorded video may not represent the current price. View hsn.com to view the current selling price. Prices shown on the previously recorded video may not represent the current price. View hsn.com to view the current selling price.SHOP NOW http://www.hsn.com
Views: 97 HSNtv
Siege of Vicksburg | Wikipedia audio article
 
29:59
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Siege of Vicksburg 00:02:04 1 Background 00:02:13 1.1 Military situation 00:04:29 1.2 Fortifications 00:05:33 2 Opposing forces 00:05:42 2.1 Union 00:06:21 2.2 Confederate 00:06:48 3 Siege 00:06:56 3.1 Assaults 00:13:39 3.2 Siege operations 00:18:52 3.3 Command changes 00:20:46 3.4 Louisiana operations 00:23:31 3.5 Crater at the Third Louisiana Redan 00:24:56 3.6 Capture 00:27:35 4 Aftermath 00:27:59 5 Battlefield preservation 00:29:24 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Siege of Vicksburg (May 18 – July 4, 1863) was the final major military action in the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War. In a series of maneuvers, Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and his Army of the Tennessee crossed the Mississippi River and drove the Confederate Army of Mississippi, led by Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton, into the defensive lines surrounding the fortress city of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Vicksburg was the last major Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River; therefore, capturing it completed the second part of the Northern strategy, the Anaconda Plan. When two major assaults (May 19 and 22, 1863) against the Confederate fortifications were repulsed with heavy casualties, Grant decided to besiege the city beginning on May 25. After holding out for more than forty days, with their reinforcement and supplies nearly gone, the garrison finally surrendered on July 4. The successful ending of the Vicksburg Campaign significantly degraded the ability of the Confederacy to maintain its war effort, as described in the Aftermath section of the campaign article. Some historians—e.g., Ballard, p. 308—suggest that the decisive battle in the campaign was actually the Battle of Champion Hill, which, once won by Grant, made victory in the subsequent siege a foregone conclusion. This action (combined with the surrender of Port Hudson to Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks on July 9) yielded command of the Mississippi River to the Union forces, who would hold it for the rest of the conflict. The Confederate surrender on July 4, 1863 is sometimes considered, when combined with Gen. Robert E. Lee's defeat at Gettysburg by Maj. Gen. George Meade, the turning point of the war. It cut off the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas from the rest of the Confederate States, effectively splitting the Confederacy in two for the duration of the war. The Union victory also permanently severed communication between the Trans-Mississippi Department and the balance of the Confederacy.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Confederate States of America | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:14:48
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Confederate States of America Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy and the South, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, whose economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.Each state declared its secession from the United States, which became known as the Union during the ensuing civil war, following the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories. Before Lincoln took office in March, a new Confederate government was established in February 1861, which was considered illegal by the government of the United States. States volunteered militia units and the new government hastened to form its own Confederate States Army from scratch practically overnight. After the American Civil War began in April, four slave states of the Upper South—Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina—also declared their secession and joined the Confederacy. The Confederacy later accepted Missouri and Kentucky as members, although neither officially declared secession nor were they ever largely controlled by Confederate forces; Confederate shadow governments attempted to control the two states but were later exiled from them. The government of the United States (the Union) rejected the claims of secession and considered the Confederacy illegally founded. The War began with the Confederate attack upon Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, a Union fort in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. No foreign government officially recognized the Confederacy as an independent country, although Great Britain and France granted it belligerent status, which allowed Confederate agents to contract with private concerns for arms and other supplies. In early 1865, after four years of heavy fighting which led to 620,000–850,000 military deaths, all the Confederate forces surrendered and the Confederacy vanished. The war lacked a formal end; nearly all Confederate forces had been forced into surrender or deliberately disbanded by the end of 1865, by which point the dwindling manpower and resources of the Confederacy were facing overwhelming odds. By 1865, Jefferson Davis lamented that the Confederacy had "disappeared".
Views: 63 wikipedia tts
Formal 06/24/14 - Norfolk City Council
 
02:04:44
04:02 PH-1 PUBLIC HEARING on the application of Old Dominion University, for the closing vacating and discontinuing a portion of 50th Street from the eastern line of Hampton Boulevard 04:20 PH-2 PUBLIC HEARING on the application of Handsome Biscuit, for change of zoning to modify the conditions attached to property zoned conditional C-2 (Corridor Commercial) on property located at 2511 Colonial Avenue 05:20 PH-3 PUBLIC HEARING on the application of the City Planning Commission, to amend the City's General Plan, plaNorfolk2030, to establish development criteria related to landscaping, setbacks, and parking to encourage a mix of uses and enhanced pedestrian activity along the southernmost sections of Colonial Avenue and Granby Street in the Park Place neighborhood 06:25 PH-4 PUBLIC HEARING to hear comments on the conveyance of a GEM Lot to Martha E. Cooper on property located 1720 Todd Street 07:02 PH-5 PUBLIC HEARING to hear comments on approving a Lease Agreement with Stumpy Lake Golf Course for operation of Lambert's Point Golf Course 11:18 PH-6 PUBLIC HEARING on the application of Talbot Hall West, LLC, a) to amend the City's General Plan, PlaNorfolk2030 from Institutional to Single Family Suburban; b) to amend the Zoning Ordinance to add Section 27-39, "Talbot Hall Residential Planned Development" (PD-R Talbot Hall) District and c) for a change of zoning from IN-1 (Institutional) to PD-R Talbot Hall on property located at 600 Talbot Hall Road 07:46 R-1 Accepting a 2013 Supplemental Local Emergency Management Performance Grant in the amount of $9,300.00 from Virginia Department of Emergency Management for the City's Office of Emergency Management and appropriating and authorizing the expenditure of the grant funds for the Sheltering Capability Program 08:12 R-2 To amend and reordain Sections 15-2, 15-3, 15-5, 15-8 and 15-9 of the Norfolk City Code, 1979 SO AS TO conform with the Stormwater Design and Construction Manual Incorporated in Chapter 41.2 08:36 R-3 To amend Ordinance Number 45,072, which permits 401 Granby Street, L.L.C. to add two blade signs to the encroaching structure 09:12 R-4 Permitting Greg Gruszeczka to encroach into Fearer Avenue right of way at 2701 Davis Street with a paved driveway approximately 10' by 115' in length 09:34 R-5 Permitting Seaboard Building, L.L.C. to encroach into W. Plume Street and Randolph Street rights of way at 100 W. Plume Street with existing canopy, roof cornices and awnings 09:55 R-6 To amend the Norfolk City Code, SO AS TO add one Trustee who may be a Retiree to the Board of Trustees of the Employees? Retirement System 10:28 R-7 Acknowledging and concurring with the May 21, 2014 Resolution of Norfolk Public Schools electing the employer certified contribution rate of 11.12% on behalf of employees who are members of the Virginia Retirement System effective July 1, 2014 Walk on Comments should be directed to city clerk's office or [email protected]
Views: 232 NorfolkTV
Magic Kingdom Live Stream - 2-9-18 - Walt Disney World
 
02:49:03
Today (Friday), we'll be live streaming at the Magic Kingdom in the Walt Disney World Resort! This Live Stream will feature lots of rides, including the TTA Peoplemover and Buzz Lightyear's Space Ranger Spin just to name a couple. Also, we will be watching the Happily Ever After Fireworks this evening, so be sure to stay tuned for that as well! We hope you enjoy our Live Stream at the Magic Kingdom! See you soon! Check out our Sponsors: Want the best Disney info on the web? Visit our friends at MickeyBlog - http://www.mickeyblog.com Want to plan a trip to Disney? Get 100% FREE planning assistance at http://www.mickeytravels.com Visit http://www.windowrepairparts.us for all of your window repair needs! Use the coupon code ResortTV1 for 20% off of your purchase! Visit http://neverlandmercantile.com for some amazing, Disney Parks-inspired bath products! Use coupon code RESORTTV1 to get 15% off of your order this weekend! Visit http://www.dreamersempire.com to help us build a community of family-friendly live streaming content! Check out Disney Demystified Volume 2 by David Mumpower: http://a.co/5cUAv4M Also, check out Volume 1 as well: http://a.co/9DEoRbb Beech Home Co. - Vintage Home Goods, Books, and Disney Stuff! https://www.etsy.com/shop/BeechHomeCo https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6ioa_A-96xrBqJQKZ1DCwg Use coupon code ResortTV1 for 15% off of your Etsy purchase! How to support ResortTV1: During Live Streams - Click the Dollar sign by the Chat Box. (Not available on iPhone, iPad or Smart TV's). Anytime - Go to http://paypal.me/ResortTV1 Anytime - Go to http://www.patreon.com/ResortTV1 We finally got a PO Box! Mail will be featured on Live Streams! Send us some mail at: ResortTV1 P.O. Box 3008 Windermere, FL 34786 Order a ResortTV1 T-Shirt: http://shop.spreadshirt.com/ResortTV1 Connect with us on your favorite networks: Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/rStEPsY Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ResortTV1 YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/ResortTV1 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ResortTV1 Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/ResortTV1 Google+: https://plus.google.com/+ResortTV1/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ResortTV1/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ResortTV1/
Views: 16634 ResortTV1
Korean War | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:58:48
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Korean War Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Korean War (in South Korean Hangul: 한국전쟁; Hanja: 韓國戰爭; RR: Hanguk Jeonjaeng, "Korean War"; in North Korean Chosŏn'gŭl: 조국해방전쟁; Hancha: 祖國解放戰爭; MR: Choguk haebang chŏnjaeng, "Fatherland: Liberation War"; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States). The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border.As a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea had been split into two sovereign states. Both governments claimed to be the sole legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces—supported by the Soviet Union and China—moved into the south on 25 June 1950. The United Nations Security Council authorized the formation and dispatch of UN forces to Korea to repel what was recognized as a North Korean invasion. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing around 90% of the military personnel.After the first two months of war, South Korean and U.S. forces rapidly dispatched to Korea were on the point of defeat, forced back to a small area in the south known as the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Incheon, and cut off many North Korean troops. Those who escaped envelopment and capture were forced back north. UN forces rapidly approached the Yalu River—the border with China—but in October 1950, mass Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. The surprise Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951. In these reversals of fortune, Seoul changed hands four times, and the last two years of fighting became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies. The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty was ever signed, and according to some sources the two Koreas are technically still at war, engaged in a frozen conflict. In April 2018, the leaders of North and South Korea met at the demilitarized zone and agreed to sign a treaty by the end of the year to formally end the Korean War.As a war undeclared by all participants, the conflict helped bring the term "police action" into common use. It also led to the permanent alteration of the balance of power within the United Nations, where Resolution 377—passed in 1950 to allow a bypassing of the Security Council if that body could not reach an agreement—led to the General Assembly displacing the Security Council as the primary organ of the UN.
Views: 43 wikipedia tts
CCSD Board of Education - Capital Project Meeting - August 30 2017
 
04:05:59
The Cornwall Central School District held a meeting at Cornwall Central High School on August 30th 2017 regarding the Capital Project.
Battle of Chickamauga | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:11:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Battle of Chickamauga 00:02:37 1 Background 00:02:45 1.1 Military situation 00:06:03 1.2 "iRiver of Death/i" 00:07:28 2 Initial movements in the Chickamauga Campaign 00:07:39 2.1 Planning the Union advance 00:10:08 2.2 Crossing the Tennessee 00:12:44 2.3 Into Georgia 00:14:38 2.4 Davis's Cross Roads 00:17:04 2.5 Final maneuvers 00:19:52 3 Opposing forces 00:20:01 3.1 Union 00:21:39 3.2 Confederate 00:23:20 4 Opening engagements 00:23:29 4.1 September 18 00:25:43 5 Battle 00:25:51 5.1 First day: September 19 00:38:17 5.2 Planning for the second day 00:43:55 5.3 Second day: September 20 01:02:03 6 Aftermath 01:04:39 6.1 Casualties 01:05:59 6.2 Reactions and effects 01:08:26 6.3 Subsequent events 01:09:05 7 Additional battle maps 01:09:22 8 Battlefield preservation 01:09:50 9 Portrayals in fiction and film 01:10:51 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Battle of Chickamauga, fought on September 18 – 20, 1863, between U.S. and Confederate forces in the American Civil War, marked the end of a Union offensive in southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia — the Chickamauga Campaign. It was the first major battle of the war fought in Georgia, the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater, and involved the second-highest number of casualties after the Battle of Gettysburg. The battle was fought between the Army of the Cumberland under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans and the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Gen. Braxton Bragg, and was named for Chickamauga Creek, which meanders near the battle area in northwest Georgia (and ultimately flows into the Tennessee River about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northeast of downtown Chattanooga). After his successful Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed the offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg's army out of Chattanooga, heading south. The Union troops followed it and brushed with it at Davis's Cross Roads. Bragg was determined to reoccupy Chattanooga and decided to meet a part of Rosecrans's army, defeat it, and then move back into the city. On September 17 he headed north, intending to attack the isolated XXI Corps. As Bragg marched north on September 18, his cavalry and infantry fought with Union cavalry and mounted infantry, which were armed with Spencer repeating rifles. Fighting began in earnest on the morning of September 19. Bragg's men strongly assaulted but could not break the Union line. The next day, Bragg resumed his assault. In late morning, Rosecrans was misinformed that he had a gap in his line. In moving units to shore up the supposed gap, Rosecrans accidentally created an actual gap, directly in the path of an eight-brigade assault on a narrow front by Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, whose corps had been detached from the Army of Northern Virginia. In the resulting rout, Longstreet's attack drove one-third of the Union army, including Rosecrans himself, from the field. Union units spontaneously rallied to create a defensive line on Horseshoe Ridge ("Snodgrass Hill"), forming a new right wing for the line of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, who assumed overall command of remaining forces. Although the Confederates launched costly and determined assaults, Thomas and his men held until twilight. Union forces then retired to Chattanooga while the Confederates occupied the surrounding heights, besieging the city.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
The Life and Adventures of Nat Love by Nat Love | Audio book with subtitles
 
04:23:41
The Life and Adventures of Nat Love Nat LOVE Nat Love was born a slave, emancipated into abject poverty, grew up riding the range as a cowboy and spent his maturity riding the rails as a Pullman Porter. For me, the most amazing thing about him is that despite the circumstances of his life, which included being owned like a farm animal solely because of the color of his skin and spending later decades living and working as an equal with white coworkers, he was an unrepentant racist! Convinced that the only good Indian was a dead one, and that all Mexicans were "greasers" and/or "bums," he rarely passed up a chance to shoot a member of either group, whether in self-defense or cold blood, and shows no sign of having appreciated the difference. At one point, he fell in love with a Mexican girl but, apparently unable to tolerate this reality, considered her "Spanish." Nat Love was a fascinating character who lived in equally interesting times, and one only wishes his autobiography was much longer and more detailed. summary by ohsostrange Genre(s): Biography & Autobiography Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
A Rebel's Recollections by George Cary Eggleston
 
05:28:53
George Cary Eggleston's Civil War memoir begins with a separate essay on the living conditions and political opinions of Virginia’s citizenry before secession. The body of the work contains vivid descriptions and accounts of the men and women of the South during the time of the Confederacy. Eggleston praises its war heroes, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and Jeb Stuart, but is highly critical of Jefferson Davis and of his government’s inefficiencies, red-tape, and favoritism. The book concludes with the war's end and a tribute to the character of the newly freed slaves. This informative and engaging work, much of which appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, enjoyed great popularity throughout the country. Originally published in 1874, it went through four editions by 1905. 1874 Preface - 00:00 1905 Preface - 01:41 The Old Regime in the Old Dominion - 07:23 Chapter 1. The Mustering - 1:05:21 Chapter 2. The Men Who Made the Army - 1:34:04 Chapter 3. The Temper of the Women - 2:02:09 Chapter 4. Of the Time When Money Was "Easy" - 2:22:18 Chapter 5. The Chevalier of the Lost Cause - 2:54:22 Chapter 6. Lee, Jackson, and Some Lesser Worthies - 3:25:10 Chapter 7. Some Queer People - 3:55:59 Chapter 8. Red Tape - 4:19:48 Chapter 9. The End, and After - 4:56:36
Views: 1328 Audiobooks Unleashed
The Long Way Home / Heaven Is in the Sky / I Have Three Heads / Epitaph's Spoon River Anthology
 
01:35:48
Spoon River Anthology (1915), by Edgar Lee Masters, is a collection of short free-form poems that collectively describe the life of the fictional small town of Spoon River, named after the real Spoon River that ran near Masters' home town. The collection includes two hundred and twelve separate characters, all providing two-hundred forty-four accounts of their lives and losses. The poems were originally published in the magazine Reedy's Mirror. Each following poem is an epitaph of a dead citizen, delivered by the dead themselves. They speak about the sorts of things one might expect: some recite their histories and turning points, others make observations of life from the outside, and petty ones complain of the treatment of their graves, while few tell how they really died. Speaking without reason to lie or fear the consequences, they construct a picture of life in their town that is shorn of façades. The interplay of various villagers — e.g. a bright and successful man crediting his parents for all he's accomplished, and an old woman weeping because he is secretly her illegitimate child — forms a gripping, if not pretty, whole. The subject of afterlife receives only the occasional brief mention, and even those seem to be contradictory. The work features such characters as Tom Merritt, Amos Sibley, Carl Hamblin, Fiddler Jones and A.D. Blood. Many of the characters that make appearances in Spoon River Anthology were based on real people that Masters knew or heard of in the two towns in which he grew up, Petersburg and Lewistown, Illinois. Most notable is Ann Rutledge, regarded in local legend to be Abraham Lincoln's early love interest though there is no actual proof of such a relationship. Rutledge's grave can still be found in a Petersburg cemetery, and a tour of graveyards in both towns reveals most of the surnames that Masters applied to his characters. Other local legends assert that Masters' fictional portrayal of local residents, often in unflattering light, created a lot of embarrassment and aggravation in his hometown. This is offered as an explanation for why he chose not to settle down in Lewistown or Petersburg. Spoon River Anthology is often used in second year characterization work in the Meisner technique of actor training. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoon_River_Anthology
Views: 157703 Remember This
Judah P. Benjamin | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:10:00
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Judah P. Benjamin 00:02:30 1 Early and personal life 00:08:18 2 Louisiana lawyer 00:11:33 3 Electoral career 00:11:43 3.1 State politician 00:15:36 3.2 Mexican railroad 00:16:44 3.3 Election to the Senate 00:19:20 3.4 Spokesman for slavery 00:23:20 3.5 Secession crisis 00:27:55 4 Confederate statesman 00:28:04 4.1 Attorney General 00:31:39 4.2 Secretary of War 00:38:58 4.3 Confederate Secretary of State 00:39:26 4.3.1 Basis of Confederate foreign policy 00:41:49 4.3.2 Appointment 00:43:27 4.3.3 Early days (1862–1863) 00:48:14 4.3.4 Increasing desperation (1863–1865) 00:52:52 5 Escape 00:57:41 6 Exile 01:03:22 7 Appraisal 01:09:25 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister. Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America. Benjamin was born to Sephardic Jewish parents from London, who had moved to St. Croix in the Danish West Indies when it was occupied by Britain during the Napoleonic Wars. Seeking greater opportunities, his family immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Charleston, South Carolina. Judah Benjamin attended Yale College but left without graduating. He moved to New Orleans, where he read law and passed the bar. Benjamin rose rapidly both at the bar and in politics. He became a wealthy planter and slaveowner and was elected to and served in both houses of the Louisiana legislature prior to his election by the legislature to the US Senate in 1852. There, he was an eloquent supporter of slavery. After Louisiana seceded in 1861, Benjamin resigned as senator and returned to New Orleans. He soon moved to Richmond after Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him as Attorney General. Benjamin had little to do in that position, but Davis was impressed by his competence and appointed him as Secretary of War. Benjamin firmly supported Davis, and the President reciprocated the loyalty by promoting him to Secretary of State in March 1862, while Benjamin was being criticized for the rebel defeat at the Battle of Roanoke Island. As Secretary of State, Benjamin attempted to gain official recognition for the Confederacy by France and the United Kingdom, but his efforts were ultimately unsuccessful. To preserve the Confederacy as military defeats made its situation increasingly desperate, he advocated freeing and arming the slaves late in the war, but his proposals were only partially accepted in the closing month of the war. When Davis fled the Confederate capital of Richmond in early 1865, Benjamin went with him. He left the presidential party and was successful in escaping from the mainland United States, but Davis was captured by Union troops. Benjamin sailed to Great Britain, where he settled and became a barrister, again rising to the top of his profession before retiring in 1883. He died in Paris the following year.
Views: 57 wikipedia tts
The Case of the White Kitten / Portrait of London / Star Boy
 
01:29:29
London is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest city, urban zone and metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the European Union by most measures.[note 1] Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[3] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core.[4] The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region[5] and the Greater London administrative area,[6][note 2] governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly.[7] London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence.[8] It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City[9][10][11] and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world depending on measurement.[note 3][12][13] London has been described as a world cultural capital.[14][15][16][17] It is the world's most-visited city measured by international arrivals[18] and has the world's largest city airport system measured by passenger traffic.[19] London's 43 universities form the largest concentration of higher education in Europe.[20] In 2012, London became the first city to host the modern Summer Olympic Games three times.[21] London has a diverse range of peoples and cultures, and more than 300 languages are spoken within its boundaries.[22] In March 2011, London had an official population of 8,174,100, making it the most populous municipality in the European Union,[23][24] and accounting for 12.5% of the UK population.[25] The Greater London Urban Area is the second-largest in the EU with a population of 8,278,251,[26] while the London metropolitan area is the largest in the EU with an estimated total population of between 12 million[27] and 14 million.[28] London had the largest population of any city in the world from around 1831 to 1925.[29]. The latest census reveals white Britons as minority in London for first time in modern times. [30] London contains four World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London; Kew Gardens; the site comprising the Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey, and St Margaret's Church; and the historic settlement of Greenwich (in which the Royal Observatory marks the Prime Meridian, 0° longitude, and GMT).[31] Other famous landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square, and The Shard. London is home to numerous museums, galleries, libraries, sporting events and other cultural institutions, including the British Museum, National Gallery, Tate Modern, British Library, Wimbledon, and 40 West End theatres.[32] The London Underground is the oldest underground railway network in the world and will complete 150 years of operations on 9 January 2013.[33][34] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London
Views: 207712 Remember This
John Hay | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:14:40
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: John Hay 00:02:10 1 Early life 00:02:19 1.1 Family and youth 00:03:49 1.2 Student and Lincoln supporter 00:06:31 2 American Civil War 00:06:41 2.1 Secretary to Lincoln 00:10:38 2.2 Presidential emissary 00:12:45 2.3 Assassination of Lincoln 00:15:01 3 Early diplomatic career 00:17:54 4 Wilderness years (1870–97) 00:18:05 4.1 iTribune/i and marriage 00:21:37 4.2 Return to politics 00:24:16 4.3 Wealthy traveler (1881–97) 00:24:27 4.3.1 Author and dilettante 00:27:19 4.3.2 McKinley backer 00:31:16 5 Ambassador 00:31:25 5.1 Appointment 00:34:16 5.2 Service 00:38:56 6 Secretary of State 00:39:06 6.1 McKinley years 00:40:12 6.1.1 Open Door Policy 00:43:50 6.1.2 Boxer Rebellion 00:45:43 6.1.3 Death of McKinley 00:47:44 6.2 Theodore Roosevelt administration 00:47:54 6.2.1 Staying on 00:49:28 6.2.2 Panama 00:54:22 6.2.3 Relationship with Roosevelt, other events 00:59:29 6.2.4 Final months and death 01:02:40 7 Literary career 01:02:49 7.1 Early works 01:06:03 7.2 iThe Bread-Winners/i 01:07:55 7.3 Lincoln biography 01:10:16 8 Assessment and legacy 01:14:17 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman and official whose career in government stretched over almost half a century. Beginning as a private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln, Hay's highest office was United States Secretary of State under Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt. Hay was also an author and biographer and wrote poetry and other literature throughout much of his life. Born in Indiana to an anti-slavery family that moved to Illinois when he was young, Hay showed great potential, and his family sent him to Brown University. After graduation in 1858, Hay read law in his uncle's office in Springfield, Illinois, adjacent to that of Lincoln. Hay worked for Lincoln's successful presidential campaign and became one of his private secretaries at the White House. Throughout the American Civil War, Hay was close to Lincoln and stood by his deathbed after the President was shot at Ford's Theatre. In addition to his other literary works, Hay co-authored with John George Nicolay a multi-volume biography of Lincoln that helped shape the assassinated president's historical image. After Lincoln's death, Hay spent several years at diplomatic posts in Europe, then worked for the New-York Tribune under Horace Greeley and Whitelaw Reid. Yet, Hay remained active in politics, and from 1879 to 1881 served as Assistant Secretary of State. Afterward, he remained in the private sector, until President McKinley, for whom he had been a major backer, made him Ambassador to the United Kingdom in 1897. Hay became Secretary of State the following year. Hay served for almost seven years as Secretary of State under President McKinley, and after McKinley's assassination, under Theodore Roosevelt. Hay was responsible for negotiating the Open Door Policy, which kept China open to trade with all countries on an equal basis, with international powers. By negotiating the Hay–Pauncefote Treaty with the United Kingdom, the (ultimately unratified) Hay–Herrán Treaty with Colombia, and finally the Hay–Bunau-Varilla Treaty with the newly-independent Republic of Panama, Hay also cleared the way for the building of the Panama Canal.
Views: 34 wikipedia tts
History of Alabama | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:17:03
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Alabama 00:07:20 1 Indigenous peoples, early history 00:07:31 1.1 Precontact 00:12:46 2 European colonization 00:24:20 3 Early statehood 00:31:56 4 Secession and Civil War, 1861-1865 00:39:45 4.1 Losses 00:41:27 5 Reconstruction, 1865-1875 00:48:48 6 Democratic politics and disfranchisement 1874-1901 00:53:30 7 Progressive era 1900-1930 00:58:45 7.1 Railroads and industry 01:00:38 8 New South, 1914-1945 01:06:23 9 Civil Rights Movement and redistricting, 1945-1975 01:15:24 10 1975-2000 01:15:36 11 Twenty-first century, 2000-present 01:16:22 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7698391929341336 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Alabama became a state of the United States of America on December 14, 1819. The United States arranged for Indian Removal after 1830, relocating most Southeast tribes to west of the Mississippi River to what was then called Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). These actions affected the Cherokee, Creek (Muscogee), and Chickasaw, among others. After this, European-American arrived in large numbers, bringing or buying African Americans in the domestic slave trade. In antebellum Alabama, wealthy planters created large cotton plantations based in the fertile central Black Belt of the upland region, which depended on the labor of enslaved Africans. Tens of thousands of slaves were transported to and sold in the state by slave traders who purchased them in the Upper South. In the mountains and foothills, poorer whites practiced subsistence farming. By 1860 blacks (nearly all slaves) comprised 45 percent of the state's 964,201 people. The state's wealthy planters considered slavery essential to their economy. As one of the largest slaveholding states, Alabama was among the first six states to secede. It declared its secession in January 1861 and joined the Confederate States of America in February. During the ensuing American Civil War Alabama had moderate levels of warfare. The population suffered economic losses and hardships as a result of the war. Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freed all enslaved people in Confederate states. The Southern capitulation in 1865 ended the Confederate state government. A decade of Reconstruction began, a controversial time that has a range of interpretation. Its biracial government established the first public schools and welfare institutions in the state. After the war, planters worked to get their vast cotton plantations back into production. African Americans chose to exert some independence as free tenant farmers and sharecroppers, rather than working in labor gangs. Wherever possible, African-American women left the fields. Small farms, which produced general crops before the war, turned to cotton as a cash crop. The market for cotton was overloaded, and prices dropped 50%.For a half century after the Civil War, Alabama was a poor, heavily rural state, with an economy based on cotton; most farmers were tenant, sharecroppers or laborers who did not own land. Reconstruction ended when conservative white Democrats, calling themselves known as "Redeemers" regained control of the state legislature by both legal and extralegal means (including violence and harassment). They established political and social dominance over African Americans. In 1901, Southern Democrats passed a state Constitution that effectively disfranchised most African Americans (who in 1900 comprised more than 45 percent of the state's population), as well as tens of thousands of poor whites. By 1941, a total 600,000 poor whites and 520,000 African Americans had been disfranchised. In addition, despite massive population changes in the state that accompanied urbanization and industrialization, the rural-dominated legislature refused to redistrict from 1901 to the 1960s, leading to massive malapportionment in Congressional and s ...
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
A Star is Born | 1937 - FREE MOVIE! Good Quality - Drama/Romance: With Subtitles
 
01:50:59
"Is the price of stardom a broken heart?" A thousand THANK YOUS if you support my work on Patreon. It takes a lot of time, effort and computer life in order to do this. The more that is received the greater amount of improved films will be made available on this channel. I owe you one...so let me know what kind of films you would like and I will do my best to get them uploaded for you to watch! https://www.patreon.com/BeforeISleepFilms A STAR IS BORN: Short Summary - A young woman comes to Hollywood with dreams of stardom, but achieves them only with the help of an alcoholic leading man whose best days are behind him. A STAR IS BORN: Full Synopsis - When a young actress (Janet Gaynor) arrives in Hollywood with hopes of stardom, a chance encounter places her under the wing of older actor Norman Maine (Fredric March). Adopting the stage name Vicki Lester, she co-stars with Norman in a major motion picture, but his success is clearly fading even as her career begins. After the couple wed, Vicki's fame continues to grow, but Norman descends into alcoholism, and she must decide between pursuing her dream and caring for him. Directed by William A. Wellman. Produced by David O. Selznick. Written by William A. Wellman, Robert Carson, Dorothy Parker Alan Campbell. Music by Max Steiner. Cinematography W. Howard Greene. Edited by James E. Newcom, Anson Stevenson Starring Janet Gaynor as Esther Blodgett/Vicki Lester, Fredric March as Norman Maine, Adolphe Menjou as Oliver Niles, May Robson as Grandmother Lettie, Andy Devine as Daniel "Danny" McGuire, Lionel Stander as Matt Libby, Owen Moore as Casey Burke, Peggy Wood as Miss Phillips, Elizabeth Jenns as Anita Regis, Edgar Kennedy as Pop Randall, J. C. Nugent as Mr. Blodgett, Guinn "Big Boy" Williams as posture coach, Clara Blandick as Aunt Mattie (uncredited), Lillian Harmer as wardrobe woman (uncredited), Carole Landis as girl in beret at Santa Anita bar (uncredited), George Chandler as Delivery Man (uncredited). A Star is Born 1937 - Good Quality: With Subtitles - Drama/Romance
Views: 279 BeforeiSleepFilms
The Great Gildersleeve: Christmas Shopping / Gildy Accused of Loafing / Christmas Stray Puppy
 
01:27:26
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 75103 Remember This