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The mole and Avogadro's number | Atoms, compounds, and ions | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the idea of a mole as a number (vs. an animal). Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-compounds/v/empirical-molecular-and-structural-formulas?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-the-atom/v/atomic-mass?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2165302 Khan Academy
What is an equivalent? | Lab values and concentrations | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Figure out how to calculate an equivalent and how it relates to a mole. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/lab-values/v/the-mole-and-avogadro-s-number?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/lab-values/v/units-for-common-medical-lab-values?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 157829 khanacademymedicine
Introduction to Combustion Analysis, Empirical Formula & Molecular Formula Problems
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to find the empirical formula and molecular formula using combustion analysis. It explains how to calculate the number of moles of each element given the mass in grams of CO2 and H2O. Examples include compounds containing Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen. This video contains plenty of practice problems New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Stoichiometry: Limiting reagent | Chemical reactions and stoichiometry | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Stoichiometry problem where we find the limiting reagent and calculate grams of product formed. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/limiting-reagent-stoichiometry/v/limiting-reactant-example-problem-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/stoichiometry-ideal/v/stoichiometry-example-problem-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1612808 Khan Academy
Molar Heat Capacities of Gases, Equipartition of Energy & Degrees of Freedom
 
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This physics video tutorial explains how to calculate the molar heat capacity of a monoatomic gas and a diatomic gas. it gives a simple formula to achieve this. In addition, it discusses the equipartition of energy principle as it relates to the average translational kinetic energy for each degree of freedom for a molecule. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Physics Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU6wPPLDsoTj1_wEf0LSNeR Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Law of Conservation of Mass - Fundamental Chemical Laws, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial discusses the law of conservation of mass and provides examples associated with chemical reactions. The conservation of mass in a chemical reaction is one of the fundamental laws in chemistry. The total mass of the reactants must equal the total mass of the products in a chemical reaction. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
From ExPASy to the PDB
 
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How to go from the accession number on ExPASY to getting a structure from the Protein Data Bank. You can also do a keyword search from the Protein Data Bank to download structures without going to ExPASy.
Views: 536 Steven Rafferty
Molarity vs. molality | Lab values and concentrations | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Learn how molarity and molality differ! Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/lab-values/v/molarity-vs-osmolarity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/lab-values/v/the-mole-and-avogadro-s-number?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 240930 khanacademymedicine
How To Calculate Gas Volumes | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Do you want to know how to calculate the volume of gases? This chemistry video will show you how to do it with simple real world examples. If you know two of these three, you can work out the third: mass in grams, number of moles and molar mass. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
STOICHIOMETRY - Limiting Reactant & Excess Reactant Stoichiometry & Moles
 
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STOICHIOMETRY - Limiting Reactant & Excess Reactant Stoichiometry & Moles - A video showing two examples of how to solve Limiting Reactant stoichiometry problems. This video also explains how to determine the excess reactant too. Stoichiometry can be a difficult concept, tune in to see how easy it can be.
Views: 203706 sciencepost
Quantifying Chemical Reactions: Stoichiometry and Moles (Accessible Preview)
 
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To manipulate chemical reactions on a large scale, scientists use stoichiometry to quantify those reactions. The use of stoichiometry ensures there are the right amount of reactants and products. Without it, reactions can be incomplete, with expensive materials wasted and harmful byproducts created. Using stoichiometry, scientists are creating chemicals that take the place of petroleum in fabricating sustainable materials. At a different lab, scientists are mimicking the process of photosynthesis to convert the sun’s energy into storable chemical energy. Part of Chemistry: Challenges and Solutions Series. Producer/Distributor: ANNENBERG Production Year: 2014 Grade Level: 10-12 Registered DCMP members can access this title for free at the following URL: http://www.dcmp.org/media/8692
Views: 190 dcmpnad
Molar Mass Lesson (Revised)
 
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This screen cast briefly describes how to find the molar mass of an element and a compound. It was intended for any secondary student learning chemistry. In order to understand the content, the learner must have a basic understanding of atoms, chemical formulas, and the periodic table. In order to view this video, you need a computer with internet access.
Views: 505 Jodie Hale
How to Calculate the Density of a Molecule : Chemistry and Physics Calculations
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation Calculating the density of a molecule can be accomplished using information you already have access to. Calculate the density of a molecule with help from a teacher with over 20 years of experience in this free video clip. Expert: Janice Creneti Bio: Janice Creneti has a bachelor's degree in secondary science education and biology from Boston University. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: Chemistry and physics calculations need to be completed in a very specific way, as oftentimes an answer will tell you quite a bit about a particular element or problem that you're working with. Get tips on how to complete various types of chemistry and physics calculations with help from a teacher with over 20 years of experience in this free video series.
Views: 5490 eHowEducation
Empirical Formula vs Molecular Formula Calculations for the MCAT
 
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http://Leah4sci.com/reactions presents: Empirical Formula vs Molecular Formula Calculations for MCAT General Chemistry Tired of conflicting and confusing MCAT advice? Access My FREE guide for everything MCAT prep: http://mcatstrategyguide.com/guide In this video: [0:25] Introduction to Molecular Formula [2:14] Definition of Empirical Formula [5:09] Sample Amino Acid Problem [7:08] Sample Percent Mass Problem This video explains the definitions, similarities, and differences between an atom's empirical formula and its molecular formula. You will also see when the empirical and molecular formulas are the same, and a percent by mass example! Links & Resources Mentioned in this Video: Amino Acid Cheat Sheet: http://leah4sci.com/amino-acids-mcat-cheat-sheet-study-guide/ Catch the entire MCAT Stoichiometry and Reactions Video Tutorial Series along with the Stoichiometry Practice Quiz and Cheat Sheet on my website at http://leah4sci.com/reactions This series will help you master AAMC Content Category 4E! Need help crafting a custom MCAT study schedule that takes your personal life and background into consideration? The strategy bootcamp will help you do that and so much more. Details: http://leah4sci.com/strategybootcamp For more hands on help with every step of the progress from strategy/planning to content review and more, come join me in the MCAT Study Hall. Full details: http://join.mcatstudyhall.com Looking for one-on-one help reviewing questions, passages and full lengths? I offer private online MCAT tutoring. Details http://leah4sci.com/mcat-tutoring/ Finally, for questions and comments, find me on social media here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Leah4Sci Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leah4Sci Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leah4sci/ Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LeahFisch Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leah4sci/
Views: 1439 Leah4sciMCAT
Determining the Mole Ratio
 
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Determining the mole ratios of a balanced chemical equation for stoichiometry.
Views: 91150 SMARTERTEACHER
Measurement and Significant Figures
 
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When we take a measurement or make a calculation, how many digits do we use? There's rules, friend! You must obey the sig figs. Don't worry, learn all about them in this clip, and you'll be the coolest kid on the block. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Molecular Weight and Formula Weight in MCAT General Chemistry
 
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http://Leah4sci.com/reactions presents: Molecular Weight and Formula Weight in MCAT General Chemistry Tired of conflicting and confusing MCAT advice? Access My FREE guide for everything MCAT prep: http://mcatstrategyguide.com/guide In this video: [0:16] Definition of Molecular Weight [1:08] Finding the AMU of Water [2:38] Finding Molecular Weight of Ethanol [4:47] The Difference Between AMU and g/mol [9:25] Molecular Weight for Ions Ex: NaCl and Glucose This video show you how to find molecular weight in AMUs, grams per mole, and formula weight conversions simply, how to convert from atomic mass units to grams, and an example of finding the molecular weight of glucose. Links & Resources Mentioned in this Video: MCAT Math Without a Calculator: http://leah4sci.com/mcat/mcat-math-without-a-calculator/ MCAT Passage Practice: http://leah4sci.com/scientific-journals-for-mcat-passage-reading-practice/ Catch the entire MCAT Stoichiometry and Reactions Video Tutorial Series along with the Stoichiometry Practice Quiz and Cheat Sheet on my website at http://leah4sci.com/reactions This series will help you master AAMC Content Category 4E! Need help crafting a custom MCAT study schedule that takes your personal life and background into consideration? The strategy bootcamp will help you do that and so much more. Details: http://leah4sci.com/strategybootcamp For more hands on help with every step of the progress from strategy/planning to content review and more, come join me in the MCAT Study Hall. Full details: http://join.mcatstudyhall.com Looking for one-on-one help reviewing questions, passages and full lengths? I offer private online MCAT tutoring. Details http://leah4sci.com/mcat-tutoring/ Finally, for questions and comments, find me on social media here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Leah4Sci Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leah4Sci Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leah4sci/ Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LeahFisch Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leah4sci/
Views: 1961 Leah4sciMCAT
Molarity Molality and Molar Mass for MCAT General Chemistry
 
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http://Leah4sci.com/reactions presents: Molarity, Molality, and Molar Mass Calculations for MCAT General Chemistry Tired of conflicting and confusing MCAT advice? Access My FREE guide for everything MCAT prep: http://mcatstrategyguide.com/guide In this video: [0:53] Difference between Molarity and Molarity [6:33] Molarity breakdown and example [12:16] Molality breakdown and example [16:11] Molarity Vs. Molality recap [19:58] When to think of Molarity and Molality as the same This video covers definitions, step by step calculations, and conversions of molar mass, molarity, and molality. You will also see examples such as finding the mass of glucose, density of water, and a quick trick to save you time on your MCAT exam regarding molarity vs molality! Links & Resources Mentioned in this Video: MCAT Math Series: http://leah4sci.com/mcat/mcat-math-without-a-calculator/ MCAT Conversions Series: http://leah4sci.com/mcat/mcat-math-without-a-calculator/unit-conversions/ Catch the entire MCAT Stoichiometry and Reactions Video Tutorial Series along with the Stoichiometry Practice Quiz and Cheat Sheet on my website at http://leah4sci.com/reactions This series will help you master AAMC Content Category 4E! Need help crafting a custom MCAT study schedule that takes your personal life and background into consideration? The strategy bootcamp will help you do that and so much more. Details: http://leah4sci.com/strategybootcamp For more hands on help with every step of the progress from strategy/planning to content review and more, come join me in the MCAT Study Hall. Full details: http://join.mcatstudyhall.com Looking for one-on-one help reviewing questions, passages and full lengths? I offer private online MCAT tutoring. Details http://leah4sci.com/mcat-tutoring/ Finally, for questions and comments, find me on social media here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Leah4Sci Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leah4Sci Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leah4sci/ Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LeahFisch Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leah4sci/
Views: 1957 Leah4sciMCAT
Properties of water | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Properties of water. What are the properties of water? What is water made of? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Mole Conversions Tutorial: how to convert mole - mass, mole - particle, mass - particle problems
 
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What is a mole and why do we use it; what is molar mass; step by step tutorial explaining how to convert mole-mass and mass-mole and how to use the periodic table for determination of molar mass; mole-particle and particle-mole conversions explained; mass-particle and particle-mass conversions explained using a dimensional analysis approach. CC Academy videos are easy 101 crash course tutorials for step by step Chemistry help on your chemistry homework, problems, and experiments. Check out our best lessons: - Solution Stoichiometry Tutorial: How to use Molarity - Stoichiometry - Quantum Numbers - Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Explained - Covalent Bonding Tutorial: Covalent vs. Ionic bonds - Metallic Bonding and Metallic Properties Explained: Electron Sea Model - Effective Nuclear Charge, Shielding, and Periodic Properties - Electron Configuration Tutorial + How to Derive Configurations from Periodic Table - Orbitals, the Basics: Atomic Orbital Tutorial — probability, shapes, energy - Metric Prefix Conversions Tutorial - Gas Law Practice Problems: Boyle's Law, Charles Law, Gay Lussac's, Combined Gas Law — More on the Mole | Wiki — "The mole is the unit of measurement in the International System of Units (SI) for amount of substance. It is defined as the amount of a chemical substance that contains as many elementary entities, e.g., atoms, molecules, ions, electrons, or photons, as there are atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12 (12C), the isotope of carbon with relative atomic mass 12 by definition. This number is expressed by the Avogadro constant, which has a value of 6.022140857(74)×1023 mol-1. The mole is one of the base units of the SI, and has the unit symbol mol. The mole is widely used in chemistry as a convenient way to express amounts of reactants and products of chemical reactions. For example, the chemical equation 2 H2 + O2 → 2 H2O implies that 2 mol of dihydrogen (H2) and 1 mol of dioxygen (O2) react to form 2 mol of water (H2O). The mole may also be used to express the number of atoms, ions, or other elementary entities in a given sample of any substance. The concentration of a solution is commonly expressed by its molarity, defined as the number of moles of the dissolved substance per litre of solution. While according to the official SI definition, the words "mol(es) of" should be followed by a singular word denoting a substance ("water", "oxygen"), they are commonly used by chemists with a plural word referring to elementary entities, such as atoms or electrons. In this usage,[1] mole is a number equal to 0.6022 trillion trillions, i.e. Avogadro's number. The expression "mol(es) of electrons", widely used in electrochemistry, is particularly incompatible with the SI definition since there is no 'electron substance' whose amount could be quantified. The number of molecules per mole is known as Avogadro's constant, and is defined such that the mass of one mole of a substance, expressed in grams, is equal to the mean relative molecular mass of the substance. For example, the mean relative molecular mass of natural water is about 18.015, therefore, one mole of water has a mass of about 18.015 grams. The term gram-molecule was formerly used for essentially the same concept.[2] The term gram-atom has been used for a related but distinct concept, namely a quantity of a substance that contains Avogadro's number of atoms, whether isolated or combined in molecules. Thus, for example, 1 mole of MgB2 is 1 gram-molecule of MgB2 but 3 gram-atoms of MgB2.[3][4] In honor of the unit, some chemists celebrate October 23, which is a reference to the 1023 scale of the Avogadro constant, as "Mole Day". Some also do the same for February 6 and June 2." Wikipedia contributors. "Mole (unit)." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 27 Jun. 2016. Web. 2 Jul. 2016.
Balancing Chemical Equations
 
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The art of balancing equations in chemistry! More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=RnGu3xO2h74 About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything.
Views: 2260667 Khan Academy
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 634527 Tyler DeWitt
Stoichiometry and the Mole | Intro & Theory
 
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Experiment 3 in CHEM 1310 is titled "Two Challenges Using Stoichiometry and the Mole." In this experiment, we'll apply stoichiometry to design and execute a chemical synthesis, and use it to figure out which of two possible products is formed in a redox reaction.
Views: 1673 Michael Evans
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2126989 CrashCourse
What are the Diatomic Elements?
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Learn what the diatomic elements are, how to remember them, and what they look like. Diatomic elements are all gases, and they form molecules because they don't have full valence shells on their own. The diatomic elements are: Bromine, Iodine, Nitrogen, Chlorine, Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine. Ways to remember them are: BrINClHOF and Have No Fear Of Ice Cold Beer.
Views: 129940 Tyler DeWitt
Rust : Prevention and treatment | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:51
Learn the basics about Rust, it's prevention and treatment. What causes rust? Why do only metals rust? How do you prevent rust? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Lec-1 Introduction and Fundamental Concepts
 
01:00:02
Lecture Series on Basic Thermodynamics by Prof.S.K. Som, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 959272 nptelhrd
Limiting Reagents and Percent Yield
 
04:35
Chemistry doesn't always work perfectly, silly. Molecules are left over when one thing runs out! Also we never get all of the products that we thought we might by doing the math. You gotta know about the limiting reagents and the percent yield! Don't worry, it's as easy as bologna sandwiches. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Carlos Bustamante: Single Molecule Manipulation in Biochemistry
 
38:30
https://www.ibiology.org/biochemistry/optical-tweezers/ Dr. Bustamante begins his talk by explaining why one would wish to study biochemical reactions at the level of single molecules. He explains that many processes within the cell are carried out by very few molecules. By studying single molecules, it is possible to obtain details about the mechanism of a reaction that cannot be ascertained by studying a population of molecules. Bustamante goes on to describe the technique of optical tweezers and how it can be used to manipulate single molecules. His lab has successfully used this method to follow DNA transcription one molecule at a time and RNA translation one codon at a time. In both cases, single molecule studies provided detailed information about complex biochemical processes.
Views: 9053 iBiology
What Happens when Stuff Dissolves?
 
04:10
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll look at what happens when you dissolve ionic and covalent compounds in water. Ionic compounds break apart into the ions that make them up, a process called dissociation, while covalent compounds only break into the molecules, not the individual atoms.
Views: 364389 Tyler DeWitt
Orbitals | Electronic structure of atoms | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
13:38
Introduction to orbitals. Relates energy shell to rows and periods in the periodic table. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/electronic-structure-of-atoms/electron-configurations-jay-sal/v/more-on-orbitals-and-electron-configuration?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/electronic-structure-of-atoms/orbitals-and-electrons/v/quantum-numbers-for-the-first-four-shells?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2172042 Khan Academy
Introduction to the atom | Chemistry of life | Biology | Khan Academy
 
21:05
The atom, proton, neutron and electron Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/electron-shells-and-orbitals/v/orbitals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/elements-and-atoms/v/elements-and-atoms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2303403 Khan Academy
Percentage Uncertainty
 
04:33
Explaining the difference between absolute uncertainty, relative uncertainty and percentage uncertainty.
Views: 131283 Jumeirah College Science
Reactions of metals with water | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:53
Learn the basics about Reactions of metals with water. Which metals react to water? What reactions can we notice? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
13. Regression
 
01:16:02
MIT 18.650 Statistics for Applications, Fall 2016 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/18-650F16 Instructor: Philippe Rigollet In this lecture, Prof. Rigollet talked about linear regression and multivariate case. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 7054 MIT OpenCourseWare
Measures of electricity | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:27
Learn the basics about Measures of electricity. What techniques and methods are used to measure electricity? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Use of the Exponent Key on the Sharp EL-531X Calculator
 
01:07
Learn how to use the exponent key on the Sharp EL-531X calculator.
Views: 39263 The Solutions Lab
Stomach Acid | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:51
Learn the basics about what stomach acid is as part of the acids and bases topic. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
How To Balance Equations - Part 1 | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
03:03
Learn the basics about balancing equations, as a part of chemical calculations. The law of conservation of mass states that no atoms are lost or made during a chemical reaction. There are different ways of arranging the atoms. Chemical reactions are about rearranging atoms. Chemical reactions can be represented by symbol equations so long as the number of atoms on each side of the equals sign remains the same. Equations need to be balanced to conserve atoms, by putting numbers in front. A good way to balance an equation is to use a table to keep track of everything. You can only change the big number in front of the compounds, which says how many molecules you have. Charges in a formula also need to be balanced. So, both the atoms and the charges have to balance. Nothing can appear or disappear! This is the most important rule about balancing: no atoms or charges can be made or destroyed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Comparing Acidity
 
02:05
Acidity of Protons (Hydrogen Atom) Comparison and explanation. There are many sites of Hydrogen atoms in a single organic molecule, which is the most and least acidic? I will guide you through. LATEST VIDEO: Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. https://youtu.be/R7aenGDGy_Q Click to access to more great videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhGppvvkkaMQ3WIGSATQp4F81nJYA-Yip Subscribe to receive videos on new instruments, machines in science, chemistry. If you would like to have more chemistry fun, and learn about cool science, subscribe to this channel to view the upcoming videos. Thanks for watching and never give up in whatever you do ! REMEMBER: “The beginning is always the hardest” FUN MAN Homepage: https://www.chemistry.nus.edu.sg/people/Teaching_staff/fungfm.htm National University of Singapore: http://www.nus.edu.sg/ Department of Chemistry: https://www.chemistry.nus.edu.sg/index.php “Ever tried. Ever failed. No Matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” - Samuel Beckett LIGHT-HEARTED CHEMISTRY LECTURE SERIES – FUN MAN FLIPPED CLASSROOM Carboxylic Acid Derivative https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNa-2B0UwyE Alkene https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_C2fw0obLdA Inductive – Resonance Effect https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DajkT2SNwZc VIDEOS ON CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES IN THE LAB UV Spectroscopy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5uIVQGFDE4 Thin Layer Chromatography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iV1GfI_BbKE Flash Column Chromatography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci2uu9Cuf5s NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv38vCHcksU Liquid-liquid extraction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdsZjeywrTk Folding Fluted Filter paper https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hY3XuXa0YuE ChemDraw Pro 15.0 Tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=037WCSsoivo Schlenk Line https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eov60kI7yw8 Glove Box https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpTc-qcNPgY
Views: 188 Fun Man FUNG
How to eat an Avocado: Nutrition Benefits, Tips & Preparation
 
16:41
On this episode of Healthytarian Living, holistic teacher Evita Ochel (http://www.evitaochel.com) shares how to eat an avocado. The video includes a demo of its preparation, sharing about the fruit's nutritional benefits, buying tips, storing, meal ideas and more. New to whole-food, plant-based eating? Check out Evita's complete video course How to Eat Whole-Food, Plant-Based on Udemy: bit.ly/1MiA3qE Avocado Recipes from Healthytarian: 1. Guacamole: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEpfIAQEIW8 2. Chocolate Avocado Pudding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgNizPsGc-s 3. Red-Green Festive Salad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVXhOH2IuUg 4. Asparagus Radish Seasonal Salad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpIIQM8VgYk NOTE: Take extra care and be mindful when using your kitchen knives to cut avocados or remove pits. The degree of sharpness and type of knife you use will make a big difference, and your safety is your responsibility.
Views: 2415186 Healthytarian
Relative atomic mass and standard atomic weight
 
03:28
Check out the written tutorial here: http://www.ninetyeast.net/chemistry/grade-11-12-ib-a-levels/atoms-and-chemicals/relative-atomic-mass-and-standard-atomic-weight ---------------------------------------------------- An easy to understand chemistry tutorial, aimed to meet the A-level (grade 11 / 12) chemistry requirements. The atomic mass of an atom is the mass of that one atom. Different isotopes will have different atomic masses - so how do we know what the average atomic mass of a chemical element is? We look at the relative atomic mass. This can sometimes be referred to as the atomic weight of a chemical element (old terminology - no longer used). To calculate the relative atomic mass of an element we need to know three things: - its different naturally occurring isotopes - the atomic mass of each of those isotopes - the abundance of each of those isotopes in a sample Once you have this information you can calculate the relative atomic mass by (carbon example in video): - multiplying each isotope's atomic mass by its relative abundance - adding these multiplications together - dividing the result by the number of atoms in the sample. Take carbon for example. In a naturally occurring sample of 100 carbon atoms you'd have two isotopes - carbon-12 (12 u) and carbon-13 (13.003 u). Ninety-nine atoms in the sample would be carbon-12, and one would be carbon-13. Its relative atomic mass or atomic weight would be: ((12.000 u x 99) + (13.003 x 1))/100 = 12.010 To end this video we introduce you to one more term: standard atomic weight. The relative atomic mass of a chemical element varies depending on the abundance of isotopes found in a sample. Sometimes different samples will contain different proportions of isotopes. For example, a sample from the ocean floor may be quite different to a sample from the top of mount Everest or even from outer space. While this can be useful, in helping us identify where samples are from etc. it's also useful to have a standard, for example, for samples that we use in the lab. And that's exactly what the standard atomic weight - the mass based on a 'normal' sample. It's the value that you'll see quoted in periodic tables. You can turn the subtitles / captions on and off as you please, using the button in the bottom right hand corner. Want the slides to make notes on as you follow along? Easy peasy - check them out here: http://www.slideshare.net/NinetyEast/relative-atomic-mass-and-standard-atomic-weight You can also access a copy of the Periodic Table with standard atomic weights listed right here: http://www.slideshare.net/NinetyEast/periodic-table-with-standard-atomic-weight ---------------------------------------------------- Check out our website: https://www.ninetyeast.net Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/101181170213212222779/ Follow us on Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/NinetyEast
Views: 2375 NinetyEast
19. Aromatic Transition States: Cycloaddition and Electrocyclic Reactions
 
49:13
Freshman Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 125B) Cyclic conjugation that arises when p-orbitals touch one another can be as important for transition states as aromaticity is for stable molecules. It is the controlling factor in "pericyclic" reactions. Regiochemistry, stereochemistry, and kinetics show that two new sigma bonds are being formed simultaneously, if not symmetrically, in the 6-electron Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Although thermal dimerization of thymine residues in DNA is forbidden, photochemistry allows the 4-electron cycloaddition. "Electrocyclic" ring opening or closing chooses a conrotatory Möbius pathway, or a disrotatory Hückel pathway, according to the number of electron pairs involved and whether light is used in the process. Dewar benzene provides an example of a very unstable molecule that can be formed photochemically and then persists because of unfavorable orbital overlap in the transition state for ring opening. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Aromatic Ions 05:59 - Chapter 2. Pericyclic Reactions: Cycloaddition, the Diels-Alder Reaction, and Photochemistry 28:15 - Chapter 3. Electrocyclic Stereochemistry 44:27 - Chapter 4. How Bad is "Forbidden"? Opening Dewar Benzene Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 5988 YaleCourses
Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:05
Learn the basics about Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air. How do you extract oxygen? What are nitogren's properties? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
How to Register for Free "Regents Chemistry" Video Series
 
03:33
Please visit www.chemvideotutor.com for more videos and to get the FREE review sheet for "100 Ways to Pass the Chemistry Regents!" This video will show Tottenville High School students how to register for free access to the "Regents Chemistry" video series (https://www.udemy.com/regents-chemistry) as well as "100 Ways to Pass the Chemistry Regents!" (https://www.udemy.com/100-ways-to-pass-the-chemistry-regents/).
Elements and atoms | Atoms, compounds, and ions | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
13:09
How elements relate to atoms. The basics of how protons, electrons and neutrons make up an atom. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-the-atom/v/atomic-number-mass-number-and-isotopes?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 3266780 Khan Academy
Lec 2 | MIT 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry
 
47:47
Classification Schemes for the Elements Mendeleyev and the Periodic Table Atomic Structure View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/3-091F04 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 121142 MIT OpenCourseWare
Electrolysis of Molten Compounds | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:04
Learn the basics about Electrolysis of Molten Compounds. What is electrolysis? What are molten compounds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool