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Polar and NonPolar Molecules: How To Tell If a Molecule is Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This video provides a fast way for you to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar. It provides examples so you can quickly distinguish nonpolar molecules from those that are polar. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of molecules that are classified as polar or nonpolar: N2, O2, Cl2, F2, H2 He, Ne, Ar, Xe CH4, C2H6, CH2=CH2, CF4, SBr6, BH3, CO2, PCl5, H2O, NH3, HF, CH3OH, CH3NH2, CH3COOH OCS, CH3F, SO2
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2360577 CrashCourse
Polar and Non Polar Covalent Molecules, Polar vs. Nonpolar - CLEAR & SIMPLE
 
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CLEAR & SIMPLE - What is the difference between polar and nonpolar molecules? Check out this video on Molecular Polarity which makes this EASY. Polar and Non Polar Covalent Molecules - This video explains how to determine if a molecule is polar or non polar. I show you how, based on symmetry alone, a molecule can be determined to polar or non polar. Although I show you the shapes of the molecules, it is important for you to be able to classify the shapes according to the VSEPR Theory, so please learn your shapes. The degree of polarity can be determine to a certain extent by the differences in electronegativity, but I don't cover that in this video. Best wishes in learning.
Views: 198028 sciencepost
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
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This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 148209 Crash Chemistry Academy
Polar & Non polar molecule || Bond moment || Dipole moment || GIC-4
 
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General organic chemistry for NEET , JEE , XII & XI examination. #NEET #JEEmains #JEEadvance #examination #Chemistryvideo #hindivideo #Freeeducation #bestvideolecture #chemistryVideo #pradeepsharma Disclaimer - All the content are of fair use . Under various sections of law the content is copyrighted . An educational institution work for the benefit of society . Subscribe followings for regular updates - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pradeepsharma1010 Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/PICSedusolutions/?ref=bookmarks website - https://chemistryvideolecture.com/ website - https://picsinstitute.com/ PICS INSTITUTE provides Class room programme for IIT-JEE | AIPMT | CBSE \ XI | XII . PICS INSTITUTE provides #Free education for the subject #Chemistry for #NTSE ,#NSTSE,#KVPY, #Science Olympiad and School exams etc. #Students can get exercise based upon this law by subscribing our you tube channel and sending request in comment section.
Views: 11722 Pradeep Sharma
How to Determine if a Molecule is Polar or Not
 
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Recorded on March 5, 2012 using a Flip Cam.
Views: 836535 Sandy Erwin
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: Animations, Examples, and Practice
 
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Learn to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar based on the polarity between bonds and the molecular geometry (shape). We start with the polarity between bonds using the electronegativity (EN) values on the Periodic Table provided. After that we’ll look at how the shape of the molecule, based on VSEPR, allows us to determine if the entire molecule is polar or nonpolar. In the video you will also learn how to deal with unbonded electron pairs (lone) and how it affects the symmetry and polarity of molecules. To help you learn and retain knowledge practice problems, with solutions, are provided throughout the video. Contents: - Finding is a bond between two atoms is polar or nonpolar. - Practice. - Finding is molecules are symmetrical and how this impacts polarity. - Practice. - The role of unbonded electron pairs on molecular shape and polarity. - Practice - Wrap up on polar and nonpolar molecules. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding Molecular Shapes done with PhET's free online website: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/molecule-shapes/latest/molecule-shapes_en.html Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 38097 Wayne Breslyn
Molecular Shape and Polarity: How to determine whether a molecule will be polar or nonpolar
 
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http://purplebonding.com A polar molecule is a molecule that has poles -- a positive and negative pole to be exact. To determine whether a molecule is polar, you first need to determine if the bonds between the atoms are polar. Next, you use VSEPR, valence shell electron pair repulsion theory, to predict the shape of the molecule. Some shapes will cause the dipoles to cancel out, much as in an even-sided tug-of-war. Some shapes will be asymmetrical, and the dipoles will not cancel out. These factors explain why carbon dioxide CO2 is nonpolar, whereas water H2O is. Watch the video to learn more about determining molecular polarity.
Views: 42381 CheminTen
How To Tell if a Bond is Polar or Nonpolar (the super easy way)
 
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In this video I will show you how to tell if a bond is polar or non-polar. I have tried to make this explanation as simple as possible.
VSEPR Theory: Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This is an introduction to the basics of VSEPR Theory. VSEPR theory is a set of rules for how to look at a Lewis structure and determine the three dimensional (3D) shape of a molecule. The shapes have to do with the location of bonds and lone electrons pairs. In this video, we'll look at the following shapes: linear, trigonal planar, bent, tetrahedral, and trigonal bipyramidal
Views: 1636986 Tyler DeWitt
4.2 Polar and non-polar molecules (SL)
 
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Applications and skills: Prediction of molecular polarity from bond polarity and molecular geometry.
Views: 15046 Mike Sugiyama Jones
Is H2O Polar or Nonpolar?
 
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If you look at the Lewis structure for H2O we can see that it is not a symmetrical molecule. However, to determine if H2O is polar we need to look at the molecular geometry or shape of the molecule. Polarity results from an unequal sharing of valence electrons. Because the H2O molecule is not symmetrical there is a region of unequal sharing. The Nitrogen atom is more electronegative and therefore the valence electrons are near them more often. This makes it more negative. The Hydrogen atoms at the bottom of the structure are then more positive. Therefore, H2O is a polar molecule.
Views: 32607 Wayne Breslyn
Is Cl2 Polar or Non-polar?  (Chlorine Gas)
 
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Learn to determine if Cl2 is polar or nonpolar based on the Lewis Structure and the molecular geometry (shape). We start with the Lewis Structure and then use VSEPR to determine the shape of the molecule. After that we’ll look at how the shape of the molecule, based on VSEPR, allows us to determine if the entire molecule is polar or nonpolar. If you look at the Lewis Structure for Cl2 it appears to be a symmetrical molecule. However, to determine if Cl2 is polar we consider the molecular geometry. A polar molecule results from an unequal/unsymmetrical sharing of valence electrons. While there may be unequal sharing of electrons in the individual bonds, in a nonpolar molecule like Cl2 these bonds are evenly distributed and cancel out. There is no net dipole and the Cl2 is non-polar. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding/ Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo). Molecular Shapes done with PhET's free online website: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/molecule-shapes/latest/molecule-shapes_en.html
Views: 1914 Wayne Breslyn
Chemistry Experiment 5.2 Polar and Nonpolar (Berean Builders)
 
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Chemistry Experiment 5.2 Polar and Nonpolar Discovering Design with Chemistry by Dr. Jay L. Wile Fig Leaf Times Two by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200096 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 645 Teach at Home
Distinguish Between Polar & Nonpolar Molecules in Biology : The Marvels of Cells & DNA
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation Polarity has to do with the distribution of electrons in a molecule. Distinguish between polar and nonpolar molecules with help from an experienced science professional in this free video clip. Expert: Michael Maidaa Contact: www.linkedin.com/pub/michael-maidaa/38/2b2/ Bio: Michael Maidaa graduated from USC Santa Barbara with a B.S in Biological Sciences. Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: Cells and DNA are some of the most complicated and fascinating things found in nature. Find out about the marvels of cells and DNA with help from an experienced science professional in this free video series.
Views: 40445 eHowEducation
Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds
 
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This video is Awesome! Understand Bonding Like Never Before. Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds - This video shows how to determine the type of bond that will form based on electronegativity values. The difference in electronegativity values result in the bond being ionic, non polar covalent or polar covalent. Ionic bonds result from the transfer of electrons, polar covalent from the uneven sharing of electrons and non polar covalent bonds from the even sharing of electrons. Tune in for the video on Polar Molecules.
Views: 129824 sciencepost
Polar Covalent Bonds
 
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Polar covalent bonds result from eneven sharing of electrons. Learn how to predict if a bond will be polar or nonpolar in this video.
Views: 149452 The Science Classroom
Electronegativity and bonding | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Electronegativity differences in bonding using Pauling scale. Using differences in electronegativity to classify bonds as covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 699827 Tyler DeWitt
Polar and Nonpolar Molecules
 
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"Hair-raising" electrostatic demonstration of polar water molecules! This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 15965 FlinnScientific
Water: A Polar Molecule
 
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Water: A Polar Molecule In this video Paul Andersen explains how the polarity of water makes life on the planet possible. Oxygen is highly electronegative and pulls the electrons closely creating a partial negative charge. The polarity of water (and the corresponding hydrogen bonds) create cohesion, adhesion, capillary action, high specific heat, and a universally good solvent. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Adblocker. English: Table of Electronegatives, March 24, 2013. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Electronegative.jpg. Blacus, Victor. Two Phases (water and Oil) in the Same State of Aggregation (liquid)., September 2010. Victor Blacus. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Water_and_oil.jpg. "File:Blue Linckia Starfish.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 28, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blue_Linckia_Starfish.JPG. "File:Bozeman MT Areal.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bozeman_MT_areal.jpg. "File:Downtown-Seattle.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Downtown-Seattle.JPG. "File:Hex ice.GIF." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hex_ice.GIF. "File:Surface Tension March 2009-3.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Surface_tension_March_2009-3.jpg. "File:Water-Elpot-Transparent-3D-Balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water-elpot-transparent-3D-balls.png. H'arnet. Français : Niveau D'un Liquide Dans Un Ensemble de Tubes Capillaires Par Rapport Au Niveau de La Surface Libre Du Liquide Dans Des Tubes de Section Ne Faisant Pas Intervenir La Capillarité Appartenant Tous À Un Même Système de Vases Communicants., August 17, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capillarit%C3%A9.PNG. Jynto. Space-Filling Model of the Allolactose Molecule, a Disaccharide Similar to Lactose., June 9, 2011. Own work This chemical image was created with Discovery Studio Visualizer. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allolactose-3D-spacefill.png. ———. Space-Filling Model of the Allolactose Molecule, a Disaccharide Similar to Lactose., June 9, 2011. Own work This chemical image was created with Discovery Studio Visualizer. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allolactose-3D-spacefill.png. Kdv2754. English: A Ball and Stick Model of a Triglyceride Fat., September 31, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Triglyceride_ballandstick.GIF. Melgar, Michael. A Drop of Water Frozen by Flash, March 15, 2007. english wikipedia. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Michael_Melgar_LiquidArt_resize_droplet.jpg. MesserWoland. Deutsch: Kapillarität Am Beispiel von Wasser Und QuecksilberEnglish: CapillarityNederlands: CapillariteitTürkçe: Kılcallık, November 9, 2006. own work created in Inkscape, based on the graphics by Daniel Stiefelmaier. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capillarity.svg. NASA. English: Astronaut Clayton Anderson Watches as a Water Bubble Floats in the Middeck of Space Shuttle Discovery during the STS-131 Mission. Note That His Image in the Bubble Is Upside down Because the Bubble Refracted the Light., April 12, 2010. www.nasa.gov : HTML : JPG. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clayton_Anderson_zero_g_edit.jpg. NASA/JPL-Caltech. English: This Artist's Concept Shows a Simulated View from the Surface of Jupiter's Moon Europa. Europa's Potentially Rough, Icy Surface, Tinged with Reddish Areas That Scientists Hope to Learn More About, Can Be Seen in the Foreground. The Giant Planet Jupiter Looms over the Horizon., August 6, 2013. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/jpl/multimedia/pia17043.html#.UgLCUuig5w0. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:View_from_Europa%27s_Surface_(Artist%27s_Concept).jpg. Pallbo. English: Image of Sugarcubes Isolated on Black., November 3, 2007. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sugarcubes.jpg. Riccio. Italiano: Molecole D'acqua Con Evidenziati I Legami a Idrogeno Ma Non I Momenti Di Dipolo)., January 4, 2014. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Molecole_d%27acqua.png. "Salts & Solubility." PhET. Accessed February 27, 2014. https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/soluble-salts.
Views: 345410 Bozeman Science
How to Determine Whether a Molecule has an Overall Molecular Dipole Moment
 
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A discussion of the method used to determine whether a molecule has an overall molecular dipole moment or not. Polar versus nonpolar molecues. General Chemistry
Views: 61372 Shawn Shields
Polar and Non-Polar Covalent Molecules
 
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Review of Polar and Non-Polar Covalent Bonds, explanation of how the force of a -pole- goes beyond the area of the pole itself, and then how to determine if Covalently Bonded Molecule is Polar or Non-Polar.
Views: 91463 MahanChem
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 847217 ketzbook
Polarity of Molecules - How To Determine Molecular Polarity
 
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Molecular Polarity - This video shows you how to determine the polarity of molecules by drawing dipole moments.
Views: 3931 Math & Science 2024
Is CH4 Polar or Nonpolar?
 
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If you look at the Lewis structure for CH4 it appears to be a symmetrical molecule. However, to determine if CH4 is polar we consider the molecular geometry or shape of the molecule. Polarity results from an unequal sharing of valence electrons. In CH4 the sharing is equal. Therefore CH4 is a nonpolar molecule. While there may be a difference in electronegativity between the Carbon and Hydrogen bonds, there is no net (overall) polarity. That makes CH4 a nonpolar molecule. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding/
Views: 60749 Wayne Breslyn
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Dipole Forces
 
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017 - Dipole Forces In this video Paul Andersen describes the intermolecular forces associated with dipoles. A dipole is a molecule that has split charge. Dipole may form associations with other dipoles, induced dipoles or ions. An important type of dipole-dipole forces are hydrogen bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:ADN Animation.gif." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ADN_animation.gif. "File:GC DNA Base Pair.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GC_DNA_base_pair.svg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:NaCl.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaCl.png. "File:Water Molecule 3D.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_molecule_3D.svg.
Views: 320113 Bozeman Science
Sigma and Pi Bonds: Hybridization Explained!
 
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Sigma bonds are the FIRST bonds to be made between two atoms. They are made from hybridized orbitals. Pi bonds are the SECOND and THIRD bonds to be made. They are made from leftover "p" orbitals. Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 1299248 chemistNATE
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 43393 Socratica
Non Polar Amino Acids Video
 
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Want the mp3? Email me at- [email protected] If the picture of non polar amino acids is hard to see, download it here- https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B2S-qPnFosj2UGNhY2Z4c1huYkE/edit?usp=sharing
Views: 4155 MisterETutorials
Lewis Diagrams and VSEPR Models
 
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022 - Lewis Diagrams and VSEPR Models In this video Paul Andersen explains how you can use Lewis Diagrams and VSEPR Models to make predictions about molecules. The Lewis diagrams are a two-dimensional representations of covalent bonds and the VSEPR models show how the molecule could exist in three dimensional space. Pi bonding and odd valence electrons require an extension of this model. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: AJ. A Blue Balloon on a Ribbon, July 18, 2008. Open clip Art Library image's page. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Blue_toy_balloon.svg. "File:Acetic Acid Atoms.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acetic_acid_atoms.svg. "File:AX4E0-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 16, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AX4E0-3D-balls.png. "File:AX6E0-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AX6E0-3D-balls.png. "File:Bent-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bent-3D-balls.png. "File:Linear-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Linear-3D-balls.png. "File:Nitrate-ion-resonance-2D.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrate-ion-resonance-2D.png. "File:Nitrogen-dioxide-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-dioxide-3D-vdW.png. "File:Pi-Bond.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pi-Bond.svg. "File:Sigma Bond.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sigma_bond.svg. "File:Tetrahedral-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tetrahedral-3D-balls.png. "File:Trigonal-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trigonal-3D-balls.png. "File:Trigonal-bipyramidal-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trigonal-bipyramidal-3D-balls.png.
Views: 359547 Bozeman Science
Biomolecules (Updated)
 
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Updated video on biomolecules (macromolecules): carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids by the Amoeba Sisters including examples, functions, monomers, and structures! Expand details for table of contents. 👇 This video has a handout here: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html (Note: The old version of this video was called biomolecule band.) Table of Contents: What are Biomolecules? 0:22 Monomers 0:40 Carbohydrates 1:08 Lipids 2:04 Proteins 4:09 Nucleic Acids 5:14 Video Note: Video mentions that many do not consider lipids to have true monomers. This is due to the fact that their building blocks are made of two different substances (glycerol and fatty acids) that attach to each other--rather than attaching as one type of monomer to another. Also, due the the diversity of lipids, there are lipids that have a very different structure than discussed in this video. Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 1747978 Amoeba Sisters
Molecular Solids
 
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026 - Molecular Solids In this video Paul Andersen describes the structure and explains the properties of molecular solids. High intramolecular forces hold electrons and reduce conductivity, whereas low intermolecular forces decrease the melting point. Important polymers can be formed from monomers and have both commercial and biological value. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:Bentley Snowflake14.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bentley_Snowflake14.jpg. "File:Carbon-dioxide-crystal-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Carbon-dioxide-crystal-3D-vdW.png. "File:Dry Ice Pellets Subliming.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dry_Ice_Pellets_Subliming.jpg. "File:Ethylene-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethylene-3D-vdW.png. "File:Fullerene C540.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fullerene_c540.png. "File:Hex ice.GIF." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hex_ice.GIF. "File:Methane-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-balls.png. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:Plastic Household Items.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Plastic_household_items.jpg. "File:Plastic Household Items.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Plastic_household_items.jpg. "File:Polyethylene-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Polyethylene-3D-vdW.png. "File:Selenocysteine Skeletal 3D.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Selenocysteine_skeletal_3D.svg. "File:Sulfur-sample.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sulfur-sample.jpg. Mills, Ben. Ball-and-stick Model of the β-D-glucose Molecule, C6H12O6, as Found in the Crystal Structure., May 21, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucose-from-xtal-3D-balls.png.
Views: 50548 Bozeman Science
Lewis Dot Structures
 
04:41
Finally, you'll understand all those weird pictures of molecules with the letters and the lines and the dots! Those are lewis dot structures. Let's learn how to draw them. It's easier than you think. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 466849 Professor Dave Explains
Drawing 3D Molecules
 
12:34
Views: 16988 Moleqlar
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
08:50
There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 37141 Socratica
Is Dirt Polar Or Nonpolar In Water?
 
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Edit non polar molecules do not have positive or negative regions. This is because oil and grease are non polar, which means they will not dissolve in the water 'salt' end of soap molecule ionic hydrophilic (water soluble). Is cooking oil, sugar, soap, and dirt polar or non in water what is chemistry. Soap [email protected] elmhurst college. Polar and non polar molecules tmjh 8th grade science. Soap polar nonpolar molecules oil water soap what makes or nonpolar? Quora. The 'salt' end of the soap molecule is ionic and hydrophilic (water dirt non polar. Lipids are usually long organic compounds, such as fats, waxes or sterols and contain a the hydrocarbon chain is non polar hydrophobic (repelled by water); And 'salt' end of soap molecule ionic hydrophilic (water soluble) h3o ions which form when an acid dissolves in water h interact with salts nonpolar ends that oils dirt jun 30, 2017 part natural negatively charged. Most of what we call dirt is grease or oil which will not come off with just water. Surfactants helping molecules get along lesson what is soap? (video) how a soap works stock video clip k004 5878 science photo soaps & detergents no brain too small. Is dirt polar or non answers. Its hydrophilic grease and oil are nonpolar insoluble in water they learn about the idea of polar non molecules how act with running over dishes will not clean them; We have to use soap!feb 3, 2015 is added, but do interact. When grease or oil (non polar hydrocarbons) are mixed with a soap water solution, the molecules work as bridge between and non long hydrocarbon chain is of course hydrophobic (repelled by water). Nonpolar compounds, like oil and grease, cannot dissolve in water. Googleusercontent search. Polar compounds can dissolve in water. How does soap work? Edinformatics. Structural biochemistry lipids soap wikibooks, open books for an chapter 23 acids, bases, and salts flashcards what is made of how does it clean? Thoughtco. Soap work? Chagrin valley soap how does soap chagrinvalleysoapandsalve work url? Q webcache. Is cs2 non polar or polar? Readily in water (sugars) refers to a substance that does not dissolve readily (fats, oils). Soap is a wonderful chemical which has molecules that are polar at one end and nonpolar the other soaps contain type of molecule called lipids. When molecules of a stearate soap are added, it has charged head and long non polar tail consisting chain end the or detergent dissolves in water, hydrophobic water is solvent and, as been oil (which holds dirt to. Soap work? Chagrin valley soap. Why does adding a little dish detergent (soap) i can see why you staying home today dirt is usually constituted of greasy substances, as oil, that are non polar and not with water molecules around it, while the tail interact may 25, 2017why we use soap. Polar and non polar molecules nau. Soap and detergents teachers' online primary science. How does soap work? Chagrin valley. Are soap molecules polar or non polar? Youtube. Grease simply dissolves into the water when magical soap is appliedoil and don't mix, right? That's why you shake up your salad dressing; To temporarily force them together.
Views: 92 Question After
Covalent Bonding
 
07:01
019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 192301 Bozeman Science
Bond Length and Bond Energy
 
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052 - Bond Length and Bond Energy In this video Paul Andersen explains how the bond length and bond energy are calculated using an energy distance graph. The strength of the bond is determined by the charges in the constituent atoms. As the charge increases the bond energy increases and the bond length decreases. Increasing numbers of bonds will also increase the energy and decrease the length. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cdang. Deutsch: Prinzip Des Laue-Verfahrens: Ein Einfallender Monochromatischer Röntgenstrahl Trifft Auf Ein Einkristall, Wird an Diesem in Bestimmte Richtungen Gebeugt Und Erzeugt Auf Der Dahinter Liegenden Fotoplatte Ein Beugungsmuster, March 30, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cliche_de_laue_principe.svg. "File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png. "File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png.
Views: 147830 Bozeman Science
Organic Chemistry 1 - Introduction / Basic Overview
 
04:01:53
This video tutorial provides an introduction or basic overview on what you will learn in your first college semester of organic chemistry. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Organic Chemistry Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5vjCqnVb6s&index=1&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU3gxU8RwqkEET2ilZ80Znj Support: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics covered in this video: 1. How To Draw Lewis Structures of Organic Compounds -Butane, Hexane, 2-methylpentane, 2-chloro-3-bromoheptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane, 2-butene, and 3-hexyne 2. How To Draw a Line Structure From a Condensed Structure: CH3CHCH2, (CH3)3CCH2CCH, (CH3)2CHCH2CH2 3. How to Draw The Lewis Structure of Functional Groups Alcohols, Carboxylic Acids, Esters, Aldehydes, Ketones, Alkyl Halides, Ethers, Amines, Amides, & Ionic Structures 4. Octet Rule, Multiple Bonding, Nonbonding Electrons, & Valency of Elements Such as Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, & Halogens like Fluorine, Bromine, and Chlorine 5. How To Calculate The Formal Charge of an Element 6. How To Draw Resonance Structures and How To Identify The Major Resonance Contributor 7. Acids and Basic Periodic Trend - Pka & Resonance Stabilization of the Conjugate Base 8. How To Predict The Products of an Acid Base Reaction In Organic Chemistry HBr + H2O CH3COOH + CH3OH CH3SH + CH3OH 9. How To Use Pka To Determine Where Equlibrium Will Shift Either To The Left or To The Right For Acid Base Reactions CH3COO- + CH3OH -- CH3COOH + CH3O- HO- + NH3 -- NH2- + H2O CH3O- + CH3SH -- CH3OH + CH3S- 10. How To Find The Hybridization, Bond Angle, and Molecular Geometry of every carbon atom or nonhydrogen atom in a compound. 11. How To Draw Sigma and Pi bonds For Ethene 12. How To Determine How Many Sigma and Pi Bonds Are In a Compound or Molecule. 13. Electronegativity and Bond Polarity 14. How To Draw Hydrogen Bonds In Water 15. The Difference Between Hydrogen Bonds and Covalent Bonds - 16. Intermolecular Bonds vs Intramolecular Bonds 17. How To Determine Which Compounds Are Polar vs Nonpolar 18. How To Know Which Compounds Are Soluble in Water - Miscible or Immiscible 19. Cis and Trans Geometric Isomers of 2-butene - No Rotation around Double Bonds 20. Conformations of Butane - Anti, Gauche, Eclipsed, Staggered, and Totally Eclipse 21. How To Draw The Newman Projection of 2-methylbutane along the C2-C3 bond 22. Angle & Ring Strain of Cycloalkanes - Cyclopropane, Cyclobutane, Cyclopentane, and Cyclohexane 23. Chair Conformations of Cyclohexane - Axial vs Equatorial Bonds 24. 1,3-diaxial Strain 25. How To Draw The Most Stable Chair Conformation of 1-tert-butyl-4-methylcyclohexane 26. Cis and Trans Chair Conformation For Cyclohexane 27. How To Determine if a Carbon Atom Is Chiral or Not 28. Enantiomers - Mirror Images - Physical Properties vs Optical Properties 29. How To Determine How Many Chiral Centers or Stereocenters Are in a Compound 30. How To Determine How Many Stereoisomers Are In a Compound 31. How To Determine R/S Configuration For a Chiral Center 32. How To Draw Fischer Projections 33. How To Assign R/S Absolute Configuration For Fischer Projections 34. Enantiomers, Diastereomers, Constitutional Isomers, & Meso Compounds 35. Addition, Substitution, Elimination & Rearrangement Reactions 36. SN2 Reactions - Nucleophile vs Substrate, 2nd Order Nucleophilic Substitution, Rate Law, Inversion of Stereochemistry, & Energy Diagram, Polar Aprotic Solvents 37. SN1 Reactions - Protic Solvents, Unequal Racemic Mixture - Retention & Inversion, First Order Nucleophilic Substitution 38. E1 Reactions - Carbocation Intermediate & First Elimination Process 39. E2 Reactions - Concerted Reaction Mechanism, Strong Unhindered vs Bulky Base - Hoffman vs Zaitsev - Major vs Minor Product 40. Electrophilic Addition Reactions of Alkenes 41. Hydrohalogenation Reactions of Alkenes - 1-butene + HBr and Peroxides 42. Regiochemistry - Markovnikov vs Anti-Markovnikov Addition 43. Stereochemistry - Anti vs Syn Addition 44. Steoreoselectivity vs Regioselectivity 45. Hydroboration Oxidation, Oxymercuration Demercuration, and Hydration 46. Hydrogenation, Bromination, and Syn Hydroxylation of Alkenes 47. Enantiomers & Meso Compounds - Alkene + Br2 - 1 vs 2 Products 48. Electrophilic Addition Reactions of Alkynes 49. Hydrogenation of Alkynes into Cis & Trans Alkenes Using H2/Lindlar's Catalyst and Na with NH3 50. Alkynes into Aldehydes & Ketones Using (Sia)2BH, THF and HgSO4, H2SO4, and H2O 51. Synthesis Reactions With Acetylene - C2H2 & NaNH2 With an Alkyl Halide like CH3Br and CH3CH2Br 52. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions of Alcohols 53. Oxidizing Agents of Alcohols - PCC, Na2Cr2O7 + H2SO4, H2CrO4 & KMnO4 - H3O+
Molecular Shape
 
05:05
Clark College Tutoring and Writing Center tutor Joey Smokey explains molecular shapes, introducing the concepts of electron geometry and molecular geometry. Joey provides images and descriptions of the five main molecular shapes: tetrahedral, trigonal planar, linear, bent, and trigonal pyramidal.
Views: 113583 Joey Smokey
Biological Molecules
 
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042 - Biological Molecules Paul Andersen describes the four major biological molecules found in living things. He begins with a brief discussion of polymerization. Dehydration synthesis is used to connect monomers into polymers and hydrolysis breaks them down again. The major characteristics of nucleic acids are described as well as there directionality from 3' to 5' end. Protein structure is describes as well as the structure of its monomers; amino acids. The carboxyl and amino ends of a protein are described. The major groups of lipids are included with a brief discussion of saturated, unsaturated and trans fats. Finally carbohydrates and their sugar monomers are discussed. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: →AzaToth. Myoglobin 3D Structure, February 5, 2008. self made based on PDB entry. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. en.wikibooks, Original uploader was Calibuon at. English: Each Nucleic Acid Contains Many Building Blocks Called Nucleotides. The Nucleotides Have a Distinctive Structure Composed of Three Components That Held Together by Covalent Bond:a Nitrogen-Containing Base (cytosine,thymine,acenine,guanine, a 5-Carbon Sugar - Ribose or Deoxyribose, a Phosphate Group., November 9, 2008. Transferred from en.wikibooks; transferred to Commons by User:Adrignola using CommonsHelper. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nucleotides.gif. "File:Alpha-D-Glucopyranose-2D-Skeletal.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alpha-D-glucopyranose-2D-skeletal.png. "File:Amino Acids.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Amino_Acids.svg. "File:Beta-D-Glucopyranose-2D-Skeletal.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucopyranose-2D-skeletal.png. "File:Biological Cell Vacuole.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Biological_cell_vacuole.svg. "File:Common Lipids Lmaps.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Common_lipids_lmaps.png. "File:Difference DNA RNA-EN.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Difference_DNA_RNA-EN.svg. "File:Nyc-Trans-Poster.gif." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, September 11, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Nyc-trans-poster.gif&oldid=464648357. "File:Rasyslami.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Rasyslami.jpg. "File:Starchy-Foods..jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Starchy-foods..jpg. glycoform. English: 3D Projection of Amylose, Alpha-1-4 Linked Glucose Polymer, January 3, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amylose_3Dprojection.corrected.png. michael. Probable Nucleic Acid Precipitated., May 6, 2007. Probable Nucleic Acid precipitated. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Probable_Nucleic_Acid_precipitated.jpg. Tyagi.anuj. Animo Group, August 20, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amino_Acid.JPG.
Views: 527247 Bozeman Science
Hybrid Orbitals explained - Valence Bond Theory | Crash Chemistry Academy
 
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This video looks at hybridization of carbon's valence orbitals in a bond, including single, double, and triple bonds. Explained are orbital overlap, sigma and pi bonds, and hybrid orbitals in carbon (methane, ethene, ethyne), nitrogen (ammonia) and in oxygen (water). A crash course tutorial on hybrid orbitals, hybridization, valence bond theory, single, double and triple bonds explained. CC Academy videos are easy 101 crash course tutorials for step by step Chemistry help on your chemistry homework, problems, and experiments. Check out our best lessons: - Solution Stoichiometry Tutorial: How to use Molarity - Stoichiometry - Quantum Numbers - Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Explained - Covalent Bonding Tutorial: Covalent vs. Ionic bonds - Metallic Bonding and Metallic Properties Explained: Electron Sea Model - Effective Nuclear Charge, Shielding, and Periodic Properties - Electron Configuration Tutorial + How to Derive Configurations from Periodic Table - Orbitals, the Basics: Atomic Orbital Tutorial — probability, shapes, energy - Metric Prefix Conversions Tutorial - Gas Law Practice Problems: Boyle's Law, Charles Law, Gay Lussac's, Combined Gas Law --- More on Atomic Orbitals -- Wikipedia "In chemistry, hybridisation (or hybridization) is the concept of mixing atomic orbitals into new hybrid orbitals (with different energies, shapes, etc., than the component atomic orbitals) suitable for the pairing of electrons to form chemical bonds in valence bond theory. Hybrid orbitals are very useful in the explanation of molecular geometry and atomic bonding properties. Chemist Linus Pauling first developed the hybridisation theory in 1931 in order to explain the structure of simple molecules such as methane (CH4) using atomic orbitals.[2] Pauling pointed out that a carbon atom forms four bonds by using one s and three p orbitals, so that "it might be inferred" that a carbon atom would form three bonds at right angles (using p orbitals) and a fourth weaker bond using the s orbital in some arbitrary direction. In reality however, methane has four bonds of equivalent strength separated by the tetrahedral bond angle of 109.5°. Pauling explained this by supposing that in the presence of four hydrogen atoms, the s and p orbitals form four equivalent combinations or hybrid orbitals, each denoted by sp3 to indicate its composition, which are directed along the four C-H bonds.[3] This concept was developed for such simple chemical systems, but the approach was later applied more widely, and today it is considered an effective heuristic for rationalising the structures of organic compounds. It gives a simple orbital picture equivalent to Lewis structures. Hybridisation theory finds its use mainly in organic chemistry.Hybrid orbitals are assumed to be mixtures of atomic orbitals, superimposed on each other in various proportions. For example, in methane, the C hybrid orbital which forms each carbon–hydrogen bond consists of 25% s character and 75% p character and is thus described as sp3 (read as s-p-three) hybridised. Quantum mechanics describes this hybrid as an sp3 wavefunction of the form N(s + √3pσ), where N is a normalisation constant (here 1/2) and pσ is a p orbital directed along the C-H axis to form a sigma bond. The ratio of coefficients (denoted λ in general) is √3 in this example. Since the electron density associated with an orbital is proportional to the square of the wavefunction, the ratio of p-character to s-character is λ2 = 3. The p character or the weight of the p component is N2λ2 = 3/4. The amount of p character or s character, which is decided mainly by orbital hybridisation, can be used to reliably predict molecular properties such as acidity or basicity." Wikipedia contributors. "Hybrid orbital." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 4 May. 2017. Web. 4 May. 2017.
Views: 156808 Crash Chemistry Academy
London Dispersion Forces
 
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016 - London Dispersion Forces In this video Paul Andersen describes the positive force intermolecular forces found between all atoms and molecules. As electrons are distributed unevenly it creates instantaneous dipoles which hold molecules together. This force even holds uncharged atoms (like Noble gases) together. London dispersion forces increase as surface area, molecule sizing and pi bonding increases. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: File:Bunsen-Tagung 1928 Ausschnitt.jpg, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bunsen-Tagung_1928_Ausschnitt.jpg. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:Neopentane 3D 1.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Neopentane_3D_1.png. "File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png. "File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2_Helium.png, n.d.
Views: 321104 Bozeman Science
K-Chem 7.4: Polarity
 
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Now that we have a handle on molecular shape, we can understand why some molecules are non-polar, even if they have polar bonds. And once we understand that, we can understand the source of our previously discussed Intermolecular Attractive Forces. Bonus: Enjoy the liberal use of the term “dipole moment”. Thanks for watching! Do you still have questions? Would you like to make a request, or a correction? Leave a comment, send an email (http://mrknuffke.net/contact), or check out the other resources available at http://mrknuffke.net/chemistry All work based on material originally created by Mark Rosengarten: http://markrosengarten.com Image Credits: All images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing, except where otherwise noted. Attribution credit where applicable: “File:3D Model Hydrogen Bonds in Water.svg - Wikimedia Commons.” Accessed August 1, 2015. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg. “OpenStax CNX.” Accessed July 31, 2015. http://cnx.org/contents/[email protected]:58/Chemistry. Zephyris. English: The Structure of DNA Showing with Detail Showing the Structure of the Four Bases, Adenine, Cytosine, Guanine and Thymine, and the Location of the Major and Minor Groove., April 26, 2011. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DNA_Structure%2BKey%2BLabelled.pn_NoBB.png.
Views: 400 David Knuffke
Polar/Nonpolar Liquids and Density Experiment
 
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Here is another easy, fun experiment for kids to do with basic things in the kitchen!
Exp 4 Trigonal Planar
 
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Learn how to recognize trigonal planar molecules using gumdrops.
Views: 148 designchemed
M2E Foundation Drawing and Naming Molecules
 
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Module 2: Chemical Foundation M2E Foundation Drawing and Naming Molecules This module introduces chemical building blocks and metrics, which are essential to understand the core concepts of green chemistry.
Views: 547 YaleCourses
Intermolecular Forces
 
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018 - Intermolecular Forces In this video Paul Andersen explains how intermolecular forces differ from intramolecular forces. He then explains how differences in these forces account for different properties in solid, liquids and gases. Some of these properties include the boiling point, melting point, surface tension, capillary action and miscibility. Intermolecular forces between gas molecules creates variation from ideal gas law. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Aejahnke. English: Enzyme Mechanism, May 22, 2011. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Enzyme_mechanism_1.jpg. "File:1GZX Haemoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:1GZX_Haemoglobin.png. "File:Dieselrainbow.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dieselrainbow.jpg. "File:Dieselrainbow.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dieselrainbow.jpg. "File:Ethyl Alcohol Usp Grade.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethyl_alcohol_usp_grade.jpg. "File:Kochendes Wasser02.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kochendes_wasser02.jpg. "File:NaCl.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaCl.png. "File:Reading the Meniscus.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Reading_the_meniscus.svg. "File:Sequoiafarm Sequoiadendron Giganteum.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sequoiafarm_Sequoiadendron_giganteum.jpg. "File:Vapor Pressure.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vapor_pressure.svg. "File:Water Molecule 3D.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_molecule_3D.svg. Konečný, Eduard. Slovenčina: Ilustrácia - Kapilárna Elevácia v Závislosti Od Priemeru Kapiláry a Materiálu z Ktrého Je Vyrobená Kapilára. Červenou Zmáčaný Povrch, Modrou - Nezmáčaný Povrch., February 17, 2007. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CapillaryAction.svg.
Views: 235538 Bozeman Science