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Congo, My Precious. The Curse of the coltan mines in Congo
 
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Watch more https://rtd.rt.com/tags/illegal-mining/ The Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa is one of the world’s most resource-rich countries. A wide range of rare minerals can be found here in abundance, all commanding high prices in world commodity markets. Diamonds for jewellery, tantalum, tungsten and gold for electronics; uranium used in power generation and weaponry and many others. Congo has copious deposits of raw materials that are in high demand internationally but remains one of the poorest countries in the world. From colonisation, with the horrors of slavery and other atrocities, to a turbulent and equally brutal present in which militant groups control the mines, Congo’s richness in natural resources has brought nothing but misery. Referred to as “conflict minerals”, these riches leave only a trail of death, destruction and poverty. Under Belgian rule, Congolese labourers were often required to meet quotas when mining different minerals. Failure could mean punishment by having a hand cut off with a machete. The country gained independence in 1960, but that didn’t put a stop to slave and child labour or to crimes being committed to extract and exploit the minerals. Warring militant fractions from inside the country and beyond seized control of mines for their own benefit while terrorising local populations. For our translator, Bernard Kalume Buleri, his country’s history of turmoil is very personal; like most Congolese people, he and his family fell victim to the unending mineral based power struggle. Born in the year of his country’s independence, he has lived through war and seen his homeland torn apart by violent looting and greed. His story is a damning testament, illustrating how nature’s bounty, instead of being a blessing, becomes a deadly curse. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rtd_documentary_channel/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 840683 RT Documentary
Mining Coltan in the DRC
 
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Video by MISEREOR. This video filmed at the Fungamwaka mine in the DRC reveals the working conditions of artisanal miners who extract the minerals that enter many daily life products such as laptops, smartphones and other electronic devices. The Fungamwaka mine is an example of a "clean mine", where no rebel groups are present to illegally tax the miners, and child labor is banned. In a sector too often dominated by exploitations and human rights violations, this example demonstrates how the sector could be cleaned up under effective regulation. The costs of doing so cannot simply be passed on mine workers who are struggling to make a decent living, but should be covered by the companies sourcing these minerals along the full supply chain.
Views: 27393 CIDSE CathDevAgencies
Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo
 
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Warlords, soldiers, and child laborers all toil over a mineral you've never even heard of. Coltan is a conflict mineral in nearly every cell phone, laptop, and electronic device. It's also tied to the deaths of over 5 million people in Congo since 1990. Hosted by Alison Suroosh Alvi | Originally released in 2011 at http://vice.com Click here to help: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/ Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 3659474 VICE
Special report : Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children
 
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It is an essential part of most mobile gadgets sold around the world and demand for cobalt is soaring. But the process of extracting the mineral from the earth comes at a huge human cost. A Sky News investigation has found children as young as four working in dangerous and squalid conditions in Cobalt mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for as little as 8p a day. Sky's special correspondent Alex Crawford reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 151378 Sky News
Mineral Rape in the DRC
 
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Grand Theft Congo (2005): The major problem facing Africa is corruption and control of resources. In the DRC, the military is stealing minerals to sell to Western companies. For downloads and more information visit http://www.journeyman.tv/18683/short-films/grand-theft-congo.html At a remote mine in central DRC, workers with torches and pick axes hack at the ruddy earth. They are mining cassiterite, a mineral vital in the production of laptops and mobile phones. But dispersed among the miners are Congolese Government troops -- in plain clothes for the camera -- literally forcing most workers to work at gunpoint. 'The soldiers always steal everything. They even come to shoot people down the mineshafts,' complains Regina Maponda. Western greed for cassiterite is fuelling the boom -- at an airfield near the mine, soldiers jealously guard their loot as it makes it way to Japan and the West. Conflict mining is a curse, and it is difficult to see what the G8 leaders can do. Elizabeth Jones - Ref. 2705 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 38870 Journeyman Pictures
Le coltan, le "minerai sale" du Congo
 
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La RDC dispose d'importantes réserves de pétrole, de cuivre, ainsi que de coltan ou de cassitérite, très recherchés dans la haute technologie.
Views: 305497 Documentaire Société
Your Smartphone Was Made By Child Slave Labor - Congo Cobalt Mines
 
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Your Smartphone Is Powered by Child Labor at Cobalt Mines in Africa. Human rights watchdog Amnesty International has accused several tech and auto industry giants of turning a blind eye to child labor. In a damning report released on Tuesday, the organization found that major brands, including Apple, Samsung, Sony, and Volkswagen, were allowing cobalt mined by children into their products. Cobalt — a metallic element that is found mostly in minerals — is a key component in the lithium-ion rechargeable batteries that power electronic devices such as laptops, smartphones, and electric cars. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), in central Africa, is the world's top cobalt producer, accounting for more than half of the planet's supply. According to the DRC's government, 20 percent of the cobalt exported by country is extracted from mines in the southern province of Katanga. Much of the cobalt mined in the region is sold to Congo Dongfang Mining International (CDM), a company owned by Chinese mineral company Zhejiang Huayou Cobalt Company Ltd (Huayou Cobalt), which the Amnesty report describes as one of the world's leading manufacturers of cobalt products. According to Amnesty, the components produced by Huayou Cobalt are then sold on to battery manufacturers in China and South Korea, who, in turn, supply some of the world's top electronics companies. A 2014 report by children's rights agency UNICEF found that approximately 40,000 children worked in mines in southern DRC, and that many of them were involved in the mining of cobalt. 'There is lots of dust, it is very easy to catch colds, and we hurt all over.' Amnesty said its report was researched jointly with DRC-based NGO African Resources Watch (Afrewatch). The report is based on interviews of miners working at four sites in the DRC. As part of their investigation, researchers spoke to 17 children, ages 9 to 17. One child said he started working at the mine when he was 7. Most of the children interviewed by Amnesty worked above ground, collecting ore and sorting through rocks, which they then washed in streams and lakes around the mines. The children described working gruelling, 12-hour shifts in the extreme heat or in the rain, often for no more than 1,000 to 2,000 Congolese Francs ($1-$2) per day. Some of them explained that their school day was bookended with shifts at the mine, and that they also worked weekends and during the holidays. Paul, 14, told researchers he also worked underground in the mines, often spending up to 24 hours at a time in unsafe tunnels. "I arrived in the morning and would leave the following morning," he said. Researchers found that the vast majority of workers in the DRC's mines handle cobalt without wearing any protective gear, such as gloves or facemasks, despite the known dangers of chronic exposure to cobalt dust. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has warned that extended exposure to cobalt dust can result in "respiratory sensitization, asthma, shortness of breath," as well as dermatitis and a serious condition known as "hard metal lung disease." Amnesty said the children they interviewed complained of frequent illness. "There is lots of dust, it is very easy to catch colds, and we hurt all over," Dany, a 15-year-old miner, told the watchdog. Amnesty also found that many of the underage miners were malnourished and subjected to "physical abuse, sexual exploitation and violence." Many of the children endured regular beatings at the hands of security guards, who also extorted them for a cut of their earnings. "They asked for money, but we didn't have any... They grabbed my friend and pushed her into a tank containing diesel oil," said Mathy, who told researchers she was 12 at the time of the incident. In a response published as an annex to the report, Apple said that underage labor was "never tolerated in our supply chain and we are proud to have led the industry in pioneering new safeguards." The company said that it was "actively looking for any violations." Microsoft said that it did not "tolerate the use of child, involuntary or forced labor" in its supply chain, but added that it was "unable to say with absolute assurance" whether cobalt in its products could be traced back to ore in the Katanga region. Samsung SDI noted that "up until now, there has been no case of child labor violations reported or detected from Samsung's SDI's plants or suppliers." But like Microsoft, the Korean company also said that it could not determine whether its cobalt supplies originated in Katanga. Music: Road of Fortunes by Dhruva Aliman https://dhruvaaliman.bandcamp.com/album/road-of-fortunes http://www.dhruvaaliman.com/
Views: 16578 Wise Wanderer
Congo: A land of riches - BBC News
 
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The Democratic Republic of the Congo could be one of the richest countries in Africa because of its mineral wealth, but yet it’s one of the poorest. Corruption and exploitation has cost the country billions. With the elections there’s hope the country’s new leaders can improve the lives of millions of people. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog DR Congo has vast resources - from the pristine rainforests to the valuable ores that lie beneath the soil. It has gold, diamonds, uranium, rare-earth metals, copper and cobalt - an essential ingredient in electric car batteries. The south-eastern province of Katanga is the centre of the country’s mining industry with vast areas of open-cast pits and 60% of the world’s cobalt reserves. To Find out more: World News Documentary: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/n3ct5fyt World Service Podcast: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06v... VR Hub: https://www.bbc.co.uk/virtualreality
Views: 16629 BBC News
Congo: A journey to the heart of Africa - Full documentary - BBC Africa
 
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The Democratic Republic of the Congo is a vast, mineral rich country the size of Western Europe. For many, it's still tainted by Joseph Conrad's brutal portrayal of colonial imperialism immortalised in The Heart of Darkness, written over 100 years ago. That's not surprising when most news reports from the DRC tell of death, disease and suffering. Alastair Leithead takes an epic journey from the Atlantic Ocean to the far reaches of the Congo river to explore how history has shaped the Congo of today and uncover the lesser told stories of this beautiful, if troubled country. In the largest rain forest outside of the Amazon he comes face to face with its gorillas and hunts with pygmies, he travels into the heart of the Ebola outbreak with United Nations peacekeepers, and explores the cobalt mines which will drive our electric cars of the future. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetoafrica Website: https://www.bbc.com/africa Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcnewsafrica/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bbcafrica/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcafrica/
Views: 25307 BBC News Africa
Diamond Deals in the DRC
 
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Views: 5588 airHockeyBest
Coltan mining in the Congo
 
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Views: 63850 sharon3156
Conflict and Coltan in Eastern Congo
 
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An obscure mineral mined in Eastern Congo is critical for the production of all modern mobile electronics. It is also responsible for funding dangerous militias who use violence and rape to intimidate and threaten the people who work in the mines. Read more about
Views: 5632 Boston University
Troubles at Banro Gold Mine in Eastern Congo
 
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Canadian mining company Banro has encountered challenges at its industrial gold mine in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, with locals complaining of displacement and a lack of jobs for area workers. Photo: Phil Moore for The Wall Street Journal Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 9216 Wall Street Journal
CBS News finds children mining cobalt in Democratic Republic of Congo
 
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A CBS News investigation found that children are mining cobalt, an expensive metal used in batteries that power smartphones and electric cars. Foreign affairs columnist Bobby Ghosh speaks to CBSN about what companies like Apple and Tesla are trying to do to clean up their supply chains.
Views: 11610 CBS News
Coltan Mining in DRC
 
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Views: 857 Shelley C
Smartphones: The world in your pocket - The Congolese Blood in your hand
 
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Google, Apple, Intel and other tech companies revealed that minerals sold to fund combattants in the Democratic Republic of Congo and nearby countries may be used in the manufacture of their gadgets. Everyday its an emergency in east of Congo due to crisis war and sexual violence. The disclosures come thanks to the reform-focused Dodd-Frank Act, which now requires thousands of companies to release an annual report detailing the use of so-called conflict minerals. Tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold-products common in electronics and known collectively as "3TG" are mined heavily in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other central African countries. Proceeds from some of the mines are used to fun an ongoing war that's become the deadliest armed conflict since World War 2, according to one study. However, because such materials travel through a variety of smelters, manufacturersand distributors before they end up in a phone or laptop, vetting the entire manufacturing line is a difficult, expensive process. The SEC has estimated that compliance with the new rule cost companies $3 to $4 billion in the first year and will cost $206 to $609 million in subsequent years. In regulatory filings, the tech giants continuously said they did not have sufficient data to fully determine whether conflict minerals were present in their products. Google wrote in its filing that "based on our due diligence, we have reason to believe that portion of the 3TG used in our products originated from the covered countries, but we have not identified any instances of sourcing that directly or indirectly supported conflict in the covered countries". The company disclosed that about 36 percent of its smelters in the Democratic republic of the Congo region have been certified as not trafficking in conflict minerals, but it could notmake a firm determination about other suppliers. Apple, which began tracking the practices of individual smelters in 2010, said that 80 percent of the smelters it does business with in the region do not use conflict minerals. But like Google, Apple said it did not know enough to definitively say whether the other suppliers use them. Intel, meanwhile, said that its microprocessors and chipsets are conflict-free, but it could not determine the conflict status of its other products. And Amazon said "majority" of the suppliers that contribute to its kindle pipeline are not using conflict minerals. Every company which made a disclosure said they would pressure their questionable suppliers to be certified as compliant with conflict-free standards. overall, the reports indicate that tech companies are at least advocating for the manufacture of conflict-free products, but they are finding it difficult to implement such initiatives on a practical level. No ones is keen on abandoning the region entirely-despite raised awareness of conflict minerals, the Democratic Republic of the Congo's share of tantalum production actually increased in 2013, according to the Wall street Journal. Some companies even argue that continuing to draw minerals from the region could allow them to be a force for good. "Rather than simply funneling its demand through a limited number of verified smelters or those that are not sourcing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," Apple wrote, "Apple believes the best way to impact human rights abuses on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo is to have critical mass of smelters verified as conflict-free, so that demand from other questionable sources is reduced."
Views: 30995 MUKELENGE
Digging for Gold: Conflict in The Congo - Equator - BBC
 
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Simon visits the Congo to see the conflicts surrounding the gold-digging industry first hand. Subscribe to the BBC Studios channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=BBCWorldwide BBC Studios Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCStudios This is a channel from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes..
Views: 15992 BBC Studios
Inside the murky business of cobalt mining in DR Congo
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN Cobalt is an essential component of batteries for smartphones and electric cars. Around 60% of it comes from just one country, DR Congo – and most of the metal is exported to China. But there are ethical concerns: Amnesty International says children and adults are mining cobalt in extremely hazardous conditions. Meanwhile, around a quarter of the cobalt extracted in DR Congo is sold through the black market. This report is from our France 2 colleagues, with Erin Ogunkeye. A programme prepared by Florence Viala, Gaëlle Essoo and Claire Pryde. http://www.france24.com/en/reportages Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 24534 FRANCE 24 English
Why Isn't Congo as Rich as Saudi Arabia? Massive Tax Evasion
 
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The Democratic Republic of the Congo is rich in natural resources, yet the average citizen lives on only 72 cents a day. The foreign mining companies are getting rich while the general population is living in poverty. Many Congolese citizens are diging through the dirt on their hands and knees in search their fair share of the countries natural minerals. While there are taxes on the mining companies who benefit from the countries resources it is proving difficult to actually collect the money that is owed. Vocativ spoke to one tax inspector who explained that tax evasion and government fraud is rampant throughout the mining industry. So it seems that until those benefiting from the countries natural wealth start paying their fare share, many average citizens will have to continue digging through the mud to get by. Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=vocativvideo See more on our website: http://www.vocativ.com Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vocativ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Vocativ
Views: 248810 Vocativ
Blood In The Mobile (ENGLISH) - FULL DOCUMENTARY
 
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Blood in the Mobile is a 2010 documentary film by Danish film director Frank Piasecki Poulsen. The film addresses the issue of conflict minerals by examining illegal cassiterite mining in the North-Kivu province in eastern DR Congo. In particular, it focuses on the cassiterite mine in Bisie.[1] The film is co-financed by Danish, German, Finnish, Hungarian and Irish television, as well as the Danish National film board. The film premiered in Denmark on September 1, 2010. During the making of the film Frank Piasecki Poulsen is working with communications professional and new media entrepreneur Mikkel Skov Petersen on the online campaign of the same name. The campaign is addressing Poulsen and Petersens notion of the responsibility of the manufacturers of mobile phones on the situation in war torn eastern Congo. The project is collaborating with NGOs like Dutch-based Make It Fair and British-based Global Witness who are also engaged in changing the conduct of Western companies regarding the industrial use of minerals of unknown origin. The cassiterite dug out in the illegal mines in North-Kivu is according to Danish corporate monitor organization Danwatch [2] primarily purchased as tin by the electronics industry after processing in East Asia. Apart from trying to raise awareness of the issue of illegal mining and alleged lack of corporate social responsibility from the mobile phone industry, the campaign is an attempt to experiment with new ways of building an audience and create additional funding for documentary films. The production of the film and the campaign is run in association with Danish new media company Spacesheep, founded in 2009 by Poulsen and Petersen in association with major Danish independent TV and film production company Koncern.
Views: 30876 Tidus Coop.
Boy describes struggle of mining cobalt in Democratic Republic of Congo
 
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A CBS News investigation found that child labor is being used in the mining of cobalt in Africa. Many top electronic and electric vehicle companies need cobalt to help power their products. Debora Patta follows one young boy home from a mine to understand the challenges he faces as his family's main provider. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 2432 CBS This Morning
Gold mining in Congo (DRC)
 
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Gold mining in Congo (DRC)
Views: 594 Sergey Antonov
Dangerous Cobalt Mines in Congo Pose Challenges for Big Tech
 
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Tech companies are trying to clean up the way they source​ cobalt,​ a key ingredient in batteries for smartphones​, laptops and electric cars​. The mineral is often dug by hand under hazardous conditions in the Democratic Republic of Congo​. Photo: Alexandra Wexler/The Wall Street Journal Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 7773 Wall Street Journal
Coltan Issue in the Congo..."Choose Life" - Pastor Moss
 
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Pastor Moss of TUCC portion of his sermon covers the issue of children dying over the mining of Coltan - Educate yourself; an excellent documentary can be found at http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/blood-coltan/ - Download letter to write your senator: http://www.fredicircle.com/CongoConflictMineralsActLettertoSenator.pdf - Lookup where to write your senator: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm
Views: 45855 Fredricka Holloway
Congo, My Precious The Curse of the coltan mines in Congo (Trailer) Premiere 5/7
 
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More films about Congo: https://rtd.rt.com/tags/congo/ “Geological scandal” is a phrase often used to describe The Democratic Republic of Congo. It is one of the world’s most resource-rich countries with extensive deposits of gold, diamonds, tungsten and uranium amongst many others. The abundance of internationally valued minerals has however failed to bring any kind of prosperity. It began with colonial exploitation of the land and its people and continued in bloody civil war, the Congolese have harvested nothing from their country’s natural riches but misery and poverty. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rtd_documentary_channel/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 12008 RT Documentary
Le coltan, minerais de conflit au Congo
 
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Fungamwaka – une mine à l’est du Congo. Ces hommes travaillent pour que nous puissions téléphoner. Ils extraient du coltan – indispensable à la production de téléphones mobiles. La république démocratique du Congo est le deuxième fournisseur mondial de cette matière première rare. Fungamwaka est une mine modèle. Elle n’emploie pas d’enfant, l’État contrôle l’extraction et prélève des impôts. Les responsables de la mine travaillent de manière légale. Surtout, aucun groupe armé n’intervient ici qui finance son combat avec le trafic de matières premières. Car la longue guerre civile financée par la richesse du sol est le plus gros problème du Congo de l’Est. 90% des mines sont exploitées par des mineurs artisanaux dans des terrains frontaliers à peine accessibles – un paradis pour les groupes de rebelles qui exigent du travail forcé des travailleurs et vendent les trésors du sol sur le marché mondial en passant par les pays voisins comme le Ruanda. Les minerais sont lavés du sable à la pelle, comme aux anciens temps des chercheurs d’or. Dans la capitale de province, l’étain ne rapporte guère plus que 5 euros par kilo, le coltan quand-même 20 euros. C’est pourquoi Misereor et d’autres organisations européennes de développement demandent une intervention de l’Union Européenne. Ils souhaitent une législation ambitieuse qui coupera les liens entre les ressources naturelles et le conflit. Des entreprises agissant sur le marché européen et vendant des produits contenant des minéraux à conflit devraient être tenues responsables de leur chaîne d’approvisionnement. Elles devraient s’assurer que les droits de l’homme sont respectés tout au long de la chaîne – des matériaux bruts aux produits finis. Et elles devraient en couvrir les coûts. À Fungamwaka, les mineurs paient seuls les contrôles – ils gagnent moins. www.misereor.org/fr twitter: http://www.twitter.com/misereor
Views: 29767 Misereor
DRC authorities move to enhance effectiveness in the mining sector
 
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Authorities in the Democratic Republic of Congo have announced changes in the mining industry aimed at improving conditions for the final users of the country's minerals. One of them is about the establishment of economic zones around the country. The announcement was made at a mining conference in the DRC's Southwestern province of Lua-laba. It comes on the heels of a new mining code that raised taxes for mining firms. CGTN's Chris Ocam-ringa has that report. Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ow.ly/Zvqj30aIsgY Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cgtnafrica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cgtnafrica
Views: 236 CGTN Africa
Crisis In The Congo  Uncovering The Truth Full Documentary
 
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Crisis In The Congo Uncovering The Truth Full Documentary
Katanga Mine: an overview of Glencore’s KCC Mining in Congo, one of our mines in DRC
 
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Glencore’s Katanga Mine is one of the group’s copper mines in Africa; it’s a major mining operator in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It operates through two companies, both joint ventures: Kamoto Copper Company (KCC) and DRC Copper and Cobalt Project (DCP). KCC runs the Kamoto project, which includes exploration and mining properties, the Kamoto concentrator, the Luilu metallurgical plant, the Kamoto underground mine and two oxide open pit mines in the Kolwezi district of the DRC. It has capacity to produce 300,000 tonnes of first-class copper cathode each year. The mine in Kolwezi is a high grade copper-cobalt asset that employs over 17,000 people. The area where it’s located is part of the African Copperbelt, one of the world’s most important copper producing regions. Glencore’s investments into mining in this region since 2009, via KCC Kolwezi, are helping to expand copper mining in Congo. This video gives an overview of operations at KCC Mining DRC, including brief interviews with Gustave Nzeng, KCC Chairman; Dodo Nduw, Operations Manager; and Dede Madika, Copper Electrolysis Plant. For more information on Glencore and KCC Congo’s investments in mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo, as well as community development, visit http://www.glencore.com/public-positions/supporting-development-in-the-drc/ For more on Katanga Mining, visit www.katangamining.com.
Views: 8156 Glencore
Congo: Combating Illegal Coltan Mining | Global 3000
 
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The Democratic Republic of Congo has rich deposits of gold, diamonds, copper and other minerals that unscrupulous business people have been eager to exploit. Rebel groups have used the sale of raw materials to fund civil war, and Rwandan militias in eastern Congo are capitalizing on the sale of coltan, a crucial raw material in the manufacture of electronic devices.Now, developed countries are stepping up pressure on industry to buy exclusively clean, or conflict-free, raw materials. The United Nations has suggested developing a certification scheme to stamp out the trade of dirty or illegally mined materials.
Views: 8351 DW News
🇨🇩 Conflicted: The Fight Over Congo's Minerals | Fault Lines
 
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The Democratic Republic of the Congo is one of the least developed countries in the world. Yet it is also home to $24tn worth of untapped mineral reserves. In the eastern hills of the country, the "three Ts" - tantalum, tungsten and tin - are mined by hand, eventually making their way into electronic devices across the world. For a decade, advocacy groups in the US and Europe pressured technology companies to pay attention to violence-linked "conflict minerals" in their products. Fault Lines travels to the region to hear from miners who have been struggling to make ends meet and questions advocacy groups that say Dodd-Frank 1502 has been a success. With evidence of fraud and smuggling, how can some of the biggest brands in the tech industry take credit for reducing violence and claim to be sourcing "conflict-free?" Fault Lines investigates if the highly publicised campaign to stop "conflict minerals" is protecting the lives of some of the most vulnerable people in Africa, or if it is doing the opposite. - Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook - - https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 30432 Al Jazeera English
This is what we die for: Child labour in the DRC cobalt mines
 
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This film documents the hazardous conditions in which artisanal miners, including thousands of children, mine cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It goes on to trace how this cobalt is used to power mobile phones, laptop computers, and other portable electronic devices. Using basic hand tools, miners dig out rocks from tunnels deep underground, and accidents are common. Despite the potentially fatal health effects of prolonged exposure to cobalt, adult and child miners work without even the most basic protective equipment. MUSIC BY NIRAJ CHAG
Views: 123893 Amnesty International
In Focus: Congo's Bloody Coltan
 
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Learn more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/africa/democratic-republic-congo-drc Produced by the Pulitzer Center, "Congo's Bloody Coltan" is a quick glimpse at coltan's role in Congo's civil war. It was featured on "Foreign Exchange with Fareed Zakaria" in the Fall of 2006. The war beginning in 1998 that pitted the armies of Congo, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Angola against those of Uganda and Rwanda induced the largest humanitarian disaster since World War II, with an estimated four million Congolese lives lost. Congo's first national elections since 1965 have taken place, but true peace and democracy remain elusive goals. This report is part of Pulitzer Center-sponsored project "Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)" (http://bit.ly/v9W7YA) by Mvemba Phezo Dizolele.
Views: 243583 Pulitzer Center
'COLTAN' Millions Die For Minerals In Congo, For Western Use
 
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That's right. COLTAN is a mineral used for many devises we use today such as I PHONES, Playstation and much more. There are never any coverage in the news showing the total deaths of the Congo people, fighting to protect their minerals. Why? Does all black lives not matter? Africa is not how they portray on TV. Africa is full of wealth and this is what the Western Leaders are all trying to get their dirty murdering hands on. Enjoy the short film.
Views: 2062 Sharon Milling
Conflict Cell Phones - The Horror We Are All Responsible For - Conspiracy Files
 
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Conflict cellphones are casuing a war in the Congo that every one of us is responsible for. A nearly two decade long war in the eastern Congo has been the deadliest in the world since World War II. That means worse than Korea, Vietnam, all the conflicts the Middle East. Why don't we ever hear anything about it? Why the cover up? According to a study released by the International Rescue Committee, an estimated 5.4 million people have been killed in the the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1996. That's a death toll equivalent to the entire population of Colorado. 45,000 deaths occur every month!! And all this is taking place in an International news media blackout. In addition hundreds of thousands of women have been raped over the past decade. Who is responsible for this unspeakable horror? Could it be (pause – point at camera)... you? The protracted wars in the Congo have led to massively wide and diverse violence against civilians by an variety of armed groups. Sexual violence has become a tool of war and control on an immense scale for all the armed groups in the Congo. Both sides. But wait how can you be to blame for this, you are asking? I'll tell you why. Do you own a mobile phone, a laptop computer? A Nintendo or PlayStation? Perhaps you should ask, “How many people died today in order to manufacture my cell phone?” Our cell phones and almost all other electronic equipment contain an essential element called tantalum. Tantalum is comprised of two minerals: columbite and tantalite. The combination of these two elements is known as coltan. And 80 percent of the world’s coltan is mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Extraction and mining of this element has fueled vicious civil wars in the Congo since 1996. Everyone involved in the mining and sale of coltan are part of this civil war. Any household electronic, phone, remote, or a laptop can contain minerals mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Armed rebel groups connected with crimes of rape and murder profit from trade of these minerals. Sale of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the eastern part of the DRC finance the militia groups that contribute to the ongoing violence in the country. These armed groups that reap enormous profits from the mineral trade in eastern Congo regularly commit shocking atrocities as they fight to control the region's most valuable mines. As well as the transportation routes and opportunities to impose taxes on everyone involved in this trade. The world's news media totally ignores this conflict. Could it have anything do do with... well draw your own conclusions why the lives of these victims are so devalued and ignored. The armed groups perpetuating the violence generate an estimated $144 million each year by trading in four main minerals, gold, tantalum, tungsten, and tin. All of of these are required to make our consumer electronics products function properly. The global demand for coltan increased when cell-phone and other electronic manufacturers discovered that this element could be used to make the products more compact. Tantalum capacitors are essential to the miniaturization of our cell phones and other gadgets. Cobalt is an important component of rechargeable batteries in mobile phones, laptops and digital cameras. Since the beginning of 2009 there has been an alarming increase in reports of sexual violence which has coincided with the renewed offensive by the Congolese armed forces against the FDLR, a Rwandan Hutu militia whose leadership was responsible for the Rwandan genocide. Many of these incidents have occurred in and around mineral rich areas of the eastern Congo. Coltan is mined by hand in the Congo by groups of men digging basins in streams and then scraping off the surface mud. A team can mine one kilo of coltan per day. Children work in mines under horrible conditions. Women are violently raped by rebels and soldiers alike and abandoned by their communities. The entire process of putting that cell phone in your pocket results in indescribable horror at every step of the way. Because war costs money weapons, ammunition and equipment have to be purchased, troops must be paid and fed. The armed thugs either occupy the mines and force civilians to work there, or they block the roads and airports on which the minerals are transported so they can illegally tax the drivers, pilots and traders. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is as large as Texas, California, Montana, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and Colorado combined. Within this huge area there are only 300 miles of paved roads. Every day, porters carry 50 kilogram backpacks of this valuable rock across a 40-mile footpath to reach one of the many mines. Only to be met at the end of the trail at gunpoint by government soldiers who refuse reimbursement for their deadly trip.make up to five dollars a day for this work. http://www.facebook.com/conspiracyfiles http://www.youtube.com/conspiracyfiles
Views: 3993 Conspiracy Files
Cobalt mining in the DRC
 
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A new report by Amnesty International and Afrewatch traces the sale of cobalt, used in lithium-ion batteries, from mines where children as young as seven and adults work in perilous conditions. This video features footage filmed by Mark Dummett and Joe Westby from the Business and Human Rights Team at Amnesty International during a research mission to the Democratic Republic of Congo investigating mining and the employment of children in mines.
Children ditch school for mining in DRC
 
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NGOs are calling for action as children in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo turn their backs on school to work in the region's mines, rich in coltan, copper, cobalt, gold and diamonds. Duration: 02:18
Views: 3586 AFP news agency
Conflict Minerals 101
 
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Congo's conflict minerals leave a trail of destruction as they make their way from the mines in eastern Congo to the mobile phone in your pocket. How does the process work? What is the human cost? What can consumers do to help end the violence being fueled by Congo's illicit mineral trade? Enough's John Prendergast breaks it all down. Visit www.raisehopeforcongo.org to find out how you can help end the world's deadliest war in the Congo. Video directed and produced by Robert Padavick. Editing and animation by Jeff Trussell. Copyright 2009 Center for American Progress.
Views: 248040 Enough Project
DR Congo struggles to control minerals trade
 
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The Democratic Republic of Congo possesses vast quantities of minerals such as gold, diamonds and coltan, but the work of extracting them is hard and dangerous. The battle for control of the DRC's natural resources has been at the heart of the conflicts which have ravaged the country in recent years, with fraud and corruption meaning that the majority of mineral exports are beyond government control. Duration: 02:38
Views: 2795 AFP news agency
Capturing conflict mineral trade in DRC: Marcus Bleasdale at TEDxCourtauldInstitute
 
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The price of modern technology: capturing conflict mineral trade in Democratic Republic of Congo - Marcus Bleasdale Marcus Bleasdale is a documentary photographer who uses his work to influence policy makers around the world. His work appears in National Geographic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, TIME and his work on human rights and conflict has been shown at the US Senate, The US House of Representatives, The United Nations and the Houses of Parliament in the UK. In this eye-opening talk, Marcus' photographs bear witness to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo that is fuelled by conflict minerals to be used in everyday electronic devices. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 8809 TEDx Talks
Whose Wealth? Cobalt from Congo
 
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This short documentary shows the human rights violations and environmental pollution in Democratic Republic of Congo as a result of unresponsible cobalt mining. Cobalt is used in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries for smart phones, laptops, and electric vehicles. To know more about this, visit read.somo.nl/story/cobalt-blues/ and goodelectronics.org/@@search?SearchableText=cobalt
Views: 18857 SOMO Researcher
Gold Mining Fuels Conflict in Eastern DRC
 
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Decades of gold mining should have given Congo a ticket to prosperity. The plundering of gold however has done little but fuel conflict in the DRC For more great video reports from all over the globe, please go to http://www.vjmovement.com and subscribe to our Youtube channel.
Views: 2083 TheVJMovement
Blood, Sweat, and Batteries: Inside Congo's Cobalt Mines I Fortune
 
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Africa's copperbelt contains two-thirds of the entire world's cobalt, a mineral required for the production of cell phones, laptops, and most importantly, electric automobiles. Produced with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Subscribe to Fortune - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=FortuneMagazineVideo FORTUNE is a global leader in business journalism with a worldwide circulation of more than 1 million and a readership of nearly 5 million, with major franchises including the FORTUNE 500 and the FORTUNE 100 Best Companies to Work For. FORTUNE Live Media extends the brand's mission into live settings, hosting a wide range of annual conferences, including the FORTUNE Global Forum. Website: http://fortune.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FortuneMagazine Twitter: https://twitter.com/FortuneMagazine Fortune Magazine is published by Time Inc.
Views: 1681 Fortune Magazine
The Mineral Which Powers Your Mobile Phone Also Fuels Endless Violence in the Congo (2009)
 
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Congo Connection (2009): The mineral Coltan has fuelled a technological revolution in the West, but in the DRC it has become a talisman of brutal violence. For similar stories, see: Rage Of War In Congo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhHFHSNvTjo Thousands Displaced In The Congo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk9ZG20ymeE The Future of Virunga's Mountain Gorillas Is In Jeopardy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYTht_-lOuw Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/4553 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Modern technology relies upon a mineral found in the Congo. Is our appetite for the latest gadgets fuelling rebel fighting in the Congo - threatening the survival of central Africa’s great gorillas? On the inside of many devices like mobile phones and laptops is the mineral ‘Coltan’, which has made our gadgets smaller and more complex. In the mineral-rich Congo, armed militia watch over the children digging this mineral from the ground. “"The government only pretends to help us"” says one miner, who pays a government official just to work. “"The Congo is a shifting sands of various militia, the largest of which is the Congolese state itself”," explains an expert on blood minerals. Yet the miners depend on the little they get from mining to survive. Electronic giants like Apple now claim they will no longer use Coltan from this area but experts are convinced the militias will “smuggle it onto the market” regardless. For local miners, the move away from African minerals is “just another way of penalising Africans”. Coltan fuels a conflict, which has seen national parks become war zones, gorillas killed for meat and hundreds of houses set on fire in turf wars over mineral territory. Yet it also feeds 400,000 petty traders. Why did it take a mobile phone to make us appreciate the injustice in the Congo? ABC Australia – Ref. 4553 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 3491 Journeyman Pictures
Human cost of mining in DR Congo Minerals that produce cell phones etc
 
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Rebels in DRC Congo overtly go on charm offense with local people in Eastern Congo where coltan -- base mineral for cell phones and video games are extracted. In an Executive Order President Obama commissioned Special Op forces to rein in the rebels. In light of the President's Executive Order and the presence of U.S. Special Ops in Congo it can be deduced that such overt actions by the rebels is condoned. See also BBC investigation on this issue: - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8234583.stm
Views: 432 James Cannings

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