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The History of Ethereum
 
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The History of Ethereum - https://www.blockgeeks.com After Satoshi released Bitcoin to the world in 2008, a community of blockchain developers and researchers started to take shape around it. Many developers contributed to the open-source development of Bitcoin. Several magazines and online blogs also started to appear, writing about interesting projects and new ideas in the space. One of the members of this community was a Canadian teenager named Vitalik Buterin who worked as a writer for a publication called Bitcoin Magazine. As he was watching the ecosystem take shape, he noticed a common problem among projects: that many of them needed to start their own blockchain. This got Vitalik wondering: wouldn’t it be nice to have one single blockchain that everyone could build their applications on, just like we have one single internet that everyone can build their websites on. Instead of figuring out how to start a blockchain, developers would then be able to focus on building their own applications. So in late 2013, Vitalik published the Ethereum whitepaper which built on many concepts from Bitcoin. The whitepaper is available today on the Ethereum Github page. In the paper, he outlined the limitations of the Bitcoin blockchain and proposed a new general-purpose blockchain that could be used as a decentralized application platform. Ethereum would be able to do everything Bitcoin could, like sending transactions between accounts, and a whole lot more. The main issue with Bitcoin was the lack of a general-purpose programming language that would allow you to create any sort of application on top of its blockchain. Bitcoin scripts are not Turing-complete, meaning you cant write simple structures like loops, and they are also limited in capability because they cant store state. These scripts are also referred to as simple versions of smart contracts. The Ethereum whitepaper described its own native currency called ether and a new runtime environment for smart contracts, called the Ethereum Virtual Machine, or EVM. A subsequent yellowpaper was released in mid-2014 by collaborator Gavin Wood that would define the technical specification of the EVM and how it would work. The yellowpaper was used to create several open-source implementations in different languages, the most popular one being the Go language client, also known as geth. The second most popular implementation was written in the Rust language and is called the Parity client. Anyone running a client is a node in the Ethereum network, which currently has over 25 thousand nodes around the world. Smart contracts are just application logic that can be expressed using the operations defined in the EVM, and they can also store data on the blockchain. EVM opcodes are low-level machine language which isn’t very human-readable, so developers write smart contracts in high-level languages that compile down to EVM opcodes. Several high-level languages exist like Serpent and Viper, but the most popular one today is called Solidity and it has a syntax similar to Javascript. Smart contracts can contain some data as well as code that manipulates that data. You can think of a smart contract like a class that has fields and methods. Anyone can use Solidity to write a smart contract and deploy it to the Ethereum blockchain using a simple transaction. You would do this by compiling your Solidity smart contract down to EVM bytecode, and then sending the bytecode as part of a transaction to the Ethereum network. Once the transaction gets mined, the smart contract is deployed to the blockchain and given a public address. Anyone can then interact with the smart contract by sending transactions to its address and specifying which method they want to invoke. The result of the method call is written to the blockchain after the transaction is mined. There is also a cost associated with invoking a smart contract method called gas. Gas is just a unit of measurement that determines how much computation an EVM opcode requires. The price of one unit of gas is set in ether, and is known as the gas price. The gas price is used to calculate the total transaction fee for invoking a method call based on how much gas it requires, and it must be paid by the sender of the transaction. An interesting thing to note is that any transaction that invokes a smart contract method gets executed on every single Ethereum node. This means that in order to mine a transaction into a block, you have to invoke any smart contract methods for it as well. In this sense, Ethereum can be thought of as a decentralized world computer where you pay for computation using ether. To read more, be sure to visit us at www.blockgeeks.com
Views: 4623 Blockgeeks
DNA of crypto currencies (englisch) like Bitcoin, Ethereum or Dash
 
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A short overview of the DNA of crypto currencies in the crypto - ecosystem. A neural network gives us a useful hint of future applications for the disruptive blockchain technology. Hier the previous (in german language) version of this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09hD4IWNECk
Stanford Seminar - Scoring (automatically) news articles to fight misinformation
 
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EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Seminar Scoring (automatically) news articles to fight misinformation Speaker: Frédéric Filloux and Eun Seo Jo, Stanford University Deepnews.ai wants to make a decisive contribution to the sustainability of the journalistic information ecosystem by addressing two problems: - The lack of correlation between the cost of producing great editorial content and its economic value. - The vast untapped potential for news editorial products. Deepnews.ai willl have a simple and accessible scoring system: the online platform receives a batch of news stories will score on a scale of 1 to 5 based on their journalistic quality. This is done automatically and in real time. This scoring system has multiple applications. On the business side, the greatest potential is the possibility to adjust the price of an advertisement to the quality of the editorial context. There is room for improvement. Today, a story that required months of work and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars carries the same unitary value (a few dollars per thousand page views) as a short, gossipy article. But times are changing. In the digital ad business, indicators are blinking red: CPMs, click-through rates, and viewability are on a steady downward decline. We believe that inevitably, advertisers and marketers will seek high-quality content--as long as they can rely on a credible indicator of quality. Deepnews.ai will interface with ad servers to assess the value of a story and price and serve ads accordingly. The higher a story's quality score, the pricier the ad space adjacent to it can be. This adjustment will substantially raise the revenue per page to match the quality of news.On the editorial side: The ability to assess the quality of news will open up opportunities for new products and services such as: Recommendation engines improvement: instead of relying on keywords or frequency, Deepnews.ai will surface stories based on substantial quality, which will increase the number of articles read per visit. (Currently, visitors to many news sites read less than two articles per visit). Personalization: We believe a reader's profile should not be limited to consumption analytics but should reflect his or her editorial preferences. Deepnews.ai is considering a dedicated "tag" which will be able to connect stories' metadata with a reader's affinity. Curation: Publishers will be able to use Deepnews.ai to offer curation services, a business currently left to players like Google and Apple. By providing technology that can automatically surface the best stories from trusted websites (even small ones), Deepnews.ai can help publishers expand their footprint. The platform will be based on two of ML approaches: a feature-based model and a text content analytic model. About the Speaker: Filloux is currently a John S. Knight Senior Research Fellow at Stanford University where he works on an artifcial intelligence project applied to journalism. Deepnews.ai is aimed at surfacing quality journalism from the web, in real time, at scale and automatically. By withelisting numerous news sources and authors, Deepnews.ai will also fight misiniformation. During the academic year 2016-2017, Frederic was an International Journalism Fellow at the JSK, along with seventeen other media professionals selected for the program. He is a graduate from the Bordeaux school of Journalism. [email protected] [email protected] https://mondaynote.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/filloux/ Twitter: @filloux Eun Seo Jo is a PhD candidate in the digital humanities and history at Stanford. She has worked on large corpus text projects with the Stanford Literary Lab focusing on the applications of machine learning methods on historical and literary questions. She is a graduate fellow at the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA) and a digital humanities consultant at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research (CIDR). Her dissertation is a computational linguistic analysis of Modernization Theory in modern American foreign policy. For more information about this seminar and its speaker, you can visit https://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/180314.html Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series provided by the Stanford Computer Forum. Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 767 stanfordonline
USENIX Security '17 - Reverse Engineering x86 Processor Microcode
 
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Philipp Koppe, Benjamin Kollenda, Marc Fyrbiak, Christian Kison, Robert Gawlik, Christof Paar, and Thorsten Holz, Ruhr-University Bochum Microcode is an abstraction layer on top of the physical components of a CPU and present in most general-purpose CPUs today. In addition to facilitate complex and vast instruction sets, it also provides an update mechanism that allows CPUs to be patched in-place without requiring any special hardware. While it is well-known that CPUs are regularly updated with this mechanism, very little is known about its inner workings given that microcode and the update mechanism are proprietary and have not been throughly analyzed yet. In this paper, we reverse engineer the microcode semantics and inner workings of its update mechanism of conventional COTS CPUs on the example of AMD’s K8 and K10 microarchitectures. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to develop custom microcode updates. We describe the microcode semantics and additionally present a set of microprograms that demonstrate the possibilities offered by this technology. To this end, our microprograms range from CPU-assisted instrumentation to microcoded Trojans that can even be reached from within a web browser and enable remote code execution and cryptographic implementation attacks. View the full program: https://www.usenix.org/sec17/program
Views: 2392 USENIX
DEF CON 26 IoT VILLAGE - John Dunlap - FPGAs a new attack surface for embedded adversaries
 
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In this talk, reverse engineer and security expert John Dunlap will present security hazards concerning the ever expanding use of Field Programmable Gate Array systems. FPGA’s are reconfigurable computers that allow programmers to redesign a CPU as if it were hardware. With this amazing capability comes significant security risks. John Dunlap will present a threat model for FPGA systems, including methods of both hardware and software attack for the purposes of exploitation and reverse engineering.
Views: 1118 DEFCONConference
AES Presentation
 
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Views: 40 Ryan Yankowsky
Cashless Society - Economic Slavery or Tool to End Corruption & Bring Transparency?
 
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Can a cashless society bring us increased freedom and transparency and end the plague of corruption? One Brazilian bank is making an attempt. Sources https://www.coindesk.com/this-brazilian-bank-is-using-ethereum-to-issue-a-stablecoin https://www.thebalance.com/pros-and-cons-of-moving-to-a-cashless-society-4160702 SUPPORT ME ON PATREON patreon.com/thecryptolark RECOMMENDED EXCHANGES BINANCE https://bit.ly/2Dyvpps KUCOIN https://bit.ly/2zLJKuv LIQUID - https://bit.ly/2Di72M2 COINBASE - GET $10 Free Bitcoin for signing up! https://bit.ly/2zqeVfV ABRA - GET $25 IN BTC - https://invite.abra.com/p9lwV0WqCR CRYPTOCURRENCY HARDWARE WALLETS LEDGER NANO S https://bit.ly/2yZp4j5 TREZOR https://bit.ly/2qERryf CERTIFIED CRYPTOCURRENCY BROKERAGE Caleb & Brown https://bit.ly/2Feq8F6 SOCIAL MEDIA - These are my only accounts, beware of scammers! TWITTER twitter.com/TheCryptoLark FACEBOOK facebook.com/TheCryptoLark TELEGRAM GROUP t.me/thecryptolark TELEGRAM HANDLE @cryptolark MINDS minds.com STEEMIT steemit.com/@larksongbird D-TUBE d.tube/#!/c/larksongbird PODCAST - find me on I-tunes "Crypto Waves" https://bit.ly/2B0X1kH CONTACT E-mail [email protected] with business or event enquiries. DISCLAIMER Everything expressed here is my opinion and not official investment advice - please do your own research before risking your own money. This video may contain copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available for research or academic purposes. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this video is distributed without profit, for research and educational purposes. Custom intro and tunes created by The Maker's Initiative - Auckland, NZ Thanks for watching; please like, subscribe, and share if you found this useful! #bitcoin #ethereum #cryptocurrency #neo #elastos #litecoin #eos #ripple #ontology #monero #stellarlumenes #cardano #nem #dash #ethereumclassic #vechain #tezos #zcash #dogecoin
Views: 2292 The Crypto Lark
DEF CON 22 - Alex Pinto - Secure Because Math: A Deep Dive On Machine Learning-Based Monitoring
 
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Presentation Available here: https://defcon.org/images/defcon-22/dc-22-presentations/Pinto-Maxwell/DEFCON-22-Pinto-Maxwell-Secure-Because-Math-Updated.pdf Secure Because Math: A Deep Dive On Machine Learning-Based Monitoring Alex Pinto CHIEF DATA SCIENTIST, MLSEC PROJECT We could all have predicted this with our magical Big Data analytics platforms, but it seems that Machine Learning is the new hotness in Information Security. A great number of startups with ‘cy’ and ‘threat’ in their names that claim that their product will defend or detect more effectively than their neighbour's product "because math". And it should be easy to fool people without a PhD or two that math just works. Indeed, math is powerful and large scale machine learning is an important cornerstone of much of the systems that we use today. However, not all algorithms and techniques are born equal. Machine Learning is a most powerful tool box, but not every tool can be applied to every problem and that’s where the pitfalls lie. This presentation will describe the different techniques available for data analysis and machine learning for information security, and discuss their strengths and caveats. The Ghost of Marketing Past will also show how similar the unfulfilled promises of deterministic and exploratory analysis were, and how to avoid making the same mistakes again. Finally, the presentation will describe the techniques and feature sets that were developed by the presenter on the past year as a part of his ongoing research project on the subject, in particular present some interesting results obtained since the last presentation on DefCon 21, and some ideas that could improve the application of machine learning for use in information security, especially in its use as a helper for security analysts in incident detection and response. Alex Pinto is the Chief Data Scientist of MLSec Project. The goal of the project is to provide a platform for hypothesis testing for people interested in the development of machine learning algorithms to support the information security monitoring practice. He has over 14 years dedicated to information security solutions architecture, strategic advisory and monitoring. He has experience with a great range of security products, and has managed SOCs and SIEM implementations for way too long. Alex currently currently holds the CISSP-ISSAP, CISA, CISM and PMP certifications, not that anyone cares. He was also a PCI QSA for almost 7 years, but is almost fully recovered. Twitter: @alexcpsec
Views: 4094 DEFCONConference
Jason Calacanis: "Angel: How to Invest in Technology Startups" | Talks at Google
 
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Jason Calacanis is a technology entrepreneur, angel investor, and the host of the weekly podcast This Week in Startups. As a scout for Silicon Valley venture capital firm Sequoia Capital and later as an angel investor, Jason has invested in 150 early-stage startups, including four that have achieved billion-dollar valuations (so far). His book, "Angel: How to Invest in Technology Startups," is published by HarperBusiness. Calacanis and Google Research Operations Manager Heath Row discuss the skills needed to pick a hit investment, what to look for in founders and investment opportunities, why VC should be democratized, and the difference between Silicon Alley, the Digital Coast, and Silicon Valley. Get the book here: https://goo.gl/8MGKW5 Moderated by Heath Row, Research Operations Manager, Google.
Views: 14522 Talks at Google
Understand the Blockchain in Two Minutes
 
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Over the past decade, an alternative digital paradigm has slowly been taking shape at the edges of the internet. This new paradigm is the blockchain. After incubating through millions of Bitcoin transactions and a host of developer projects, it is now on the tips of tongues of CEOs and CTOs, startup entrepreneurs, and even governance activists. Though these stakeholders are beginning to understand the disruptive potential of blockchain technology and are experimenting with its most promising applications, few have asked a more fundamental question: What will a world driven by blockchains look like a decade from now? Learn more: http://www.iftf.org/blockchainfutureslab Contact us: http://www.iftf.org/blockchainfutureslab/contact
MLTalks: Neal Stephenson
 
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Award-winning sci-fi author Neal Stephenson, who is also the chief futurist at Magic Leap, in conversation with Ariel Ekblaw, founder and lead of the Media Lab's Space Exploration Initiative, and Joe Paradiso, head of the Responsive Environments research group. #MLTalks More information at:https://www.media.mit.edu/events/mltalks-stephenson/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 6710 MIT Media Lab
“Moore’s Law Is Really Dead: What Next?” at ACM Turing 50 Celebration
 
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The 50-year reign of Moore’s Law, which delivered a billion-fold increase in transistors per chip, is finally over. Given that transistors are no longer getting much better, that the power budgets of microprocessors are not increasing, and that we’ve already replaced the single power-hungry processor with several energy-efficient ones, the only path to improve energy-performance-cost is specialized hardware. Microprocessors of the future will include special-purpose processors that do one class of computation much better than general-purpose processors. Accelerators for deep neural networks are but one of many potential targets. Panelists will discuss what old doors this seismic change will close and what new doors it will open. Moderator: John Hennessy, Stanford University Panelists: Doug Burger, Microsoft Research Norman P. Jouppi, Google Margaret Martonosi, Princeton University Butler Lampson (1992 Turing Laureate), Microsoft
Microsoft Build 2019 - LIVE Stream - Day 2 (May 7)
 
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To watch more sessions and ask questions live on air head over to https://aka.ms/MicrosoftBuildLive
Views: 15911 Microsoft Developer
Dr. Manuel Chakravarty, IOHK Language Architect, on Cardano programming - Episode 14
 
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Follow Dr. Manuel Chakravarty https://twitter.com/tacticalgrace Trezor Model T hardware wallet now supports ADA https://shop.trezor.io/product/trezor-model-t?offer_id=15&aff_id=1728 Download Yoroi https://yoroiwallet.com Follow us on https://twitter.com/CardanoEffect https://www.facebook.com/cardano.effect https://www.reddit.com/r/thecardanoeffect Contact us with questions [email protected] Youtube Channels https://www.youtube.com/c/sebastienguillemot https://www.youtube.com/c/DigitalFortress https://www.youtube.com/c/philpa6 For greater community involvement you can visit the conversations at: Forum: https://forum.cardano.org Telegram: https://t.me/CardanoGeneral Music from ProleteR: Bandcamp : https://proleter.bandcamp.com/album/curses-from-past-times-ep Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ProleteR.beats Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/proleter-beatmaker The Cardano Effect is licensed under Creative Commons CC BY 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ADA Tip Jar: DdzFFzCqrhsviEQfHp1HMbXBk7LMoPXGPijAgDk2D3rpWD3i9sHhsviUB1TiZFyMbTM2z8kkPLHKeB6G5fTzNkY93GGUTBxiAyDXbXn1 #thecardanoeffect #cardano #ada
Views: 2737 The Cardano Effect
Vint Cerf | Talks at Google
 
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Googlers are lucky to have among them some great luminaries of computer science, including VP and Chief Internet Evangelist Vint Cerf. If you dont know Vint, you can start by checking out his nearly 380,000 mentions on Google, the pivotal roles hes played in developing the web, the significant honors he's received all over the world, and his nickname, father of the Internet. You can learn more by attending a rare tech talk by Vint, presented by the Greyglers*: Reimagining the Internet: If we'd known then what we know now, what would we have done differently? Back in the Internet's design phase, Bob Kahn and I spent six months developing concepts and architecture and a year creating the TCP specification, but we didn't know that the idea would work. We concentrated on solving the problems we envisioned, such as networks that couldn't handle each other's packet lengths. Security against direct attacks and authentication of sources weren't high on the agenda. Now that we have spam, DDOS, viruses, and worms, we look back and think about what we might have done differently had we realized that we were creating a global infrastructure for the 21st century!
Views: 41641 Talks at Google
DEF CON 23 - John Seymour - Quantum Classification of Malware
 
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Quantum computation has recently become an important area for security research, with its applications to factoring large numbers and secure communication. In practice, only one company (D-Wave) has claimed to create a quantum computer which can solve relatively hard problems, and that claim has been met with much skepticism. Regardless of whether it is using quantum effects for computation or not, the D-Wave architecture cannot run the standard quantum algorithms, such as Grover’s and Shor’s. The D-Wave architecture is instead purported to be useful for machine learning and for heuristically solving NP-Complete problems. We'll show why the D-Wave and the machine learning problem for malware classification seem especially suited for each other. We also explain how to translate the classification problem for malicious executables into an optimization problem which a D-Wave machine can solve. Specifically, using a 512-qubit D-Wave Two processor, we show that a minimalist malware classifier, with cross-validation accuracy comparable to standard machine learning algorithms, can be created. However, even such a minimalist classifier incurs a surprising level of overhead. Speaker Bio: John Seymour is a Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where he performs research at the intersection of machine learning and information security. He's mostly interested in avoiding and helping others avoid some of the major pitfalls in machine learning, especially in dataset preparation (seriously, do people still use malware datasets from 1998?) In 2014, he completed his Master’s thesis on the subject of quantum computation applied to malware analysis. He currently works at CyberPoint International, a company which performs network and host-based machine learning, located in Baltimore, MD.
Views: 1253 DEFCONConference
Getting Started With Cryptocurrencies - Episode 4 - Learning Cryptocurrency with Energi
 
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Welcome to Episode 4 - Getting Started with Cryptocurrencies. This video will cover some important terminology, words, and concepts that are common in the cryptocurrency space. We will also briefly cover some of the most popular cryptocurrencies of today. Topics covered in this video include smart contracts, internet of things, dApps, altcoins, marketcaps, and much more. Cryptocurrencies are probably the biggest revolution in economic history the world has ever seen. In this video series you are going to get all the necessary information to get started in cryptos. Timestamps: 0:51 Getting familiar with crypto 6:33 Bull markets vs Bear market 7:58 How to evaluate a crypto 11:07 How to buy cryptos Energi Website https://www.energi.world/ Energi Earndrop (Round 2 and 3 currently live!) https://earndrop.energi.world/homepage -These videos express opinions about the cryptocurrency market. They are not investment advice. Always do your own thorough research before making any investment decisions. -These videos are independently directed and produced. They were submitted as a proposal to the Energi ecosystem (at https://vote.energi.network/), and were subsequently supported by the Energi decentralized community. Social Medias Twitter: https://twitter.com/Energicrypto Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/sCtgNC3 Telegram General Energi Chat: https://t.me/energicrypto Telegram Announcement Channel: https://t.me/energiannouncements Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/energicryptocurrency/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/energicrypto/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCABQly0NNR2j_M_iDpy8mA/ Medium: https://medium.com/energi Github: https://github.com/energicryptocurrency LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/energi-core/ Exchanges Cryptopia: https://www.cryptopia.co.nz/Exchange/?market=NRG_BTC CryptoBridge: https://wallet.crypto-bridge.org/market/BRIDGE.NRG_BRIDGE.BTC Coinexchange: https://www.coinexchange.io/market/NRG/BTC
Views: 585 Energi
PlayStation Live From E3 Day 1
 
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#PlayStationE3 continues with live programming all day Tuesday. Here’s what’s coming up: 11:00 AM - The Last of Us Part II | E3 Coliseum Panel 12:00 PM - Ghost of Tsushima | Gameplay Rewind 12:15 PM - Dreams | Live Gameplay Demo 12:45 PM - Spyro Reignited Trilogy | Live Gameplay Demo 1:00 PM - Days Gone | Live Gameplay Demo 1:15 PM - The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit 1:30 PM - Marvel’s Spider-Man | Live Gameplay Demo 2:00 PM - Concrete Genie | Live Gameplay Demo 2:15 PM - Kingdom Hearts 3 | Developer Interview 2:30 PM - Assassin’s Creed Odyssey | Developer Interview 2:45 PM - Hitman 2 | Developer Interview 3:00 PM - Death Stranding | E3 Coliseum Panel 4:00 PM - Resident Evil 2 | Live Gameplay Demo 4:15 PM - Trover Save the Universe | Justin Roiland Interview 4:45 PM - Nioh 2 | Developer Interview 5:00 PM - Anthem | Developer Interview 5:15 PM - Days Gone | Developer Interview 5:30 PM - Scuf Vantage Controller Unboxing 5:45 PM - Just Cause 4 | Developer Interview 6:15 PM - Shadow of the Tomb Raider | Developer Interview 6:30 PM - Call of Duty: Black Ops IIII | Developer Interview
Views: 35794 PlayStation Europe
DEFCON 13: Lost in Translation
 
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Speaker: Christian Grothoff This presentation describes the possibilities of steganographically embedding information in the "noise" created by automatic translation of natural language documents. An automated natural language translation system is ideal for steganographic applications, since natural language translation leaves plenty of room for variation. Also, because there are frequent errors in legitimate automatic text translations, additional errors inserted by an information hiding mechanism are plausibly undetectable and would appear to be part of the normal noise associated with translation. Significantly, it should be extremely difficult for an adversary to determine if inaccuracies in the translation are caused by the use of steganography or by perceptions and deficiencies of the translation software. A prototype, Lost in Translation (LiT), will be presented. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/defcon13_information To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/defcon13_videos
Views: 106 Christiaan008
El Mito del Estado Emprendedor
 
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En este vídeo se presenta y critica el libro 'El Estado Emprendedor' de Mariana Mazzucato.
Views: 907 SFLBarcelona TV
Walter Isaacson: "The Innovators" | Talks at Google
 
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The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution Walter Isaacson and two pioneers of the Internet, Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn, discuss Isaacson's new book, and how their collaboration changed the way the world communicates. In his new book, The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, Walter Issacson explores the power of creative and disruptive innovation. This conversation, led by Cerf, Google's Chief Internet Evangelist, and delves into Isaacson's story of the Digital Revolution and the people who made it happen. "
Views: 24471 Talks at Google
“Quantum Computing: Far Away? Around the Corner?" at ACM Turing 50 Celebration
 
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Quantum computing holds the promise to enormously increase computing performance in areas including cryptography, optimization, search, quantum chemistry, materials science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, personalized medicine and drug discovery. Quantum computing hardware is maturing swiftly. Depending on the expert you talk with, quantum computing is around the corner or a few years away. Concurrently, research on algorithms that take advantage of quantum computing is also moving briskly. In this discussion, panelists will look at where we are in both theory and practice, where we are headed, and what quantum skills the average computer scientist will eventually need. Moderator: Umesh Vazirani, University of California, Berkeley Panelists: Dorit Aharonov, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jay M. Gambetta, IBM Research John Martinis, Google and University of California, Santa Barbara Andrew Chi-Chih Yao (2000 Turing Laureate), Tsinghua University
#Binance Exchange Instructional Video Competition! 2,000 $BNB in Prizes! #cryptocurrency
 
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REGISTER, DEPOSIT, WITHDRAWL, and TRADE Please use our Binance Referal: https://www.binance.com/?ref=15306963 HOW TO SPEND CRYPTOCURRENCY! STRATEGY! DON’T FEAR THE FUD! FUD IS CRUD! CRYPTO NEWS and MORE! THAT’S YOU! THAT’S ME! LAMBOS AIN’T FREE ! WE ARE THE CRYPTOSPENDERS! Always open for advertisement place your ads here. LOL This channel is dedicated to spending CRYPTOCURRENCY to encourage growth of implementation! THAT HELPS US ALL! Please like and subscribe to the channel and click the alerts button for more up to date information. BTC: 14q4Wsta7nyEEYdndrDGXwjZVqDHEN33FZ ETH: 0xec8546ca286c56615e577a0d555ad9065ba44b45 LTC: LWh8tPn8QP9ftNshDg6RqhoSgiayGf6oHR EOS: 0xec8546ca286c56615e577a0d555ad9065ba44b45 NEO: AaKEqCRhMs5pHN9kpkXUmuGJdTLYQxa1F1 BNB: 0xec8546ca286c56615e577a0d555ad9065ba44b45 Tags: Cryptocurrency, Lambos, POS, Point of Sale, China, South Korea, Worldwide, Cryptos, BTC, ETH ,EOS, XRP, QTUM, IOTA, NEO, NEO GAS, OMG, LTC, ICON, BTC news, Bitcion news, Crypto News, Cryptocurrency News, Crypto_Spender, Crypto_spender, cryptospenders, places to spend cryptos, places to spend cryptocurrency Links: https://money.usnews.com/investing/investing-101/articles/2017-11-06/best-bitcoin-wallet-of-2018 https://blockonomi.com/best-bitcoin-wallets/ https://www.amazon.com/Trezor-bitcoin-wallet-Black/dp/B00R6MKDDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1516851970&sr=1-1&keywords=trezor+bitcoin+wallet&refinements=p_85%3A2470955011%2Cp_72%3A1248879011 https://www.amazon.com/Trezor-Hardware-digital-currency-Litecoin/dp/B01LVVA07X/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1516851970&sr=1-2&keywords=trezor+bitcoin+wallet&refinements=p_85%3A2470955011%2Cp_72%3A1248879011 https://www.amazon.com/Bitcoin-VUVIV-Micro-USB-Adapter-Archival/dp/B078RXFFNN/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1516851970&sr=1-4&keywords=trezor+bitcoin+wallet&refinements=p_85%3A2470955011%2Cp_72%3A1248879011 https://www.amazon.com/Ledger-Nano-Cryptocurrency-Hardware-Wallet/dp/B01J66NF46/ref=pd_bxgy_147_img_3?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01J66NF46&pd_rd_r=53XJW1K741KDT7X7WN7G&pd_rd_w=UI21D&pd_rd_wg=599N4&psc=1&refRID=53XJW1K741KDT7X7WN7G https://www.amazon.com/2-Pack-Ledger-Nano-Cryptocurrency-Hardware/dp/B076B8LTBC/ref=sr_1_12?s=electronics&rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1516851970&sr=1-12&keywords=trezor+bitcoin+wallet&refinements=p_85%3A2470955011%2Cp_72%3A1248879011 https://steemkr.com/cryptocurrency/@mrilevi/the-top-5-best-altcoin-wallets-an-overview https://coinomi.com/ https://coinsutra.com/best-litecoin-wallets/ https://www.geckoandfly.com/23587/bitcoin-wallet-ios-android/ https://copay.io/ https://www.geckoandfly.com/23532/bitcoin-wallet-low-transaction-fees/ https://multibit.org/ https://wirexapp.com/ https://xapo.com/wallet/ https://news.bitcoin.com/south-korean-national-pension-fund-invests-crypto-exchanges/?utm_source=OneSignal%20Push&utm_medium=notification&utm_campaign=Push%20Notifications https://news.bitcoin.com/oil-company-wants-to-sell-bitcoin-atms-to-casinos-stock-jumps-60/?utm_source=OneSignal%20Push&utm_medium=notification&utm_campaign=Push%20Notifications https://news.bitcoin.com/scientist-deciphers-instructions-to-claim-bitcoin-in-a-dna-sample/?utm_source=OneSignal%20Push&utm_medium=notification&utm_campaign=Push%20Notifications
Views: 27 Crypto Spender
Earth(ly) Matters: Beyond the Human II: Sense-Making and Justice
 
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Moderator: Jeffrey Moser (Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Brown University) Speakers: Mark Cladis (Brooke Russell Astor Professor of Humanities and Chair of Religious Studies, Brown University) presents "Racial and Environmental Justice in the Wild" Katherine Behar (Associate Professor of New Media Arts, Baruch College, City University of New York) presents "What Makes Sense? Environmental Sensing and Nonhuman Sense" For more info: https://www.brown.edu/academics/humanities/earthly-matters-2018 Friday, April 6, 2018 Brown University
Views: 241 Brown University
NEO DevCon 2019 DAY 2 Live Streaming 2019/02/17
 
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NEO DevCon 2019 DAY 2 Live Streaming 2019/02/17 Timestamps: 14:29 Cryptoeconomics and Data Metrics for the Next Market Cycle - Nolan Bauerle, Director of Research,Coindesk 39:20 NEL - bring NEO One Step Closer to Users - Liu Yongxin, Founder, NEL and NNS 50:00 Perspectives on Cryptography, Consensus Mechanisms & High-Performance Computing for NEO 3.0 - Sergei Liubich, Anatoly Bogatyrev --- Break --- 1:35:29 Secure Development in Cryptocurrencies - Fernando Díaz Toledano; Diego Jurado Pallarés 1:49:08 Panel: User Experience and Security Enhancements of NEO Wallets - Merten; Lasky; Knight; DiCarlo 2:11:15 Celer Network: Bring Internet-Scale Adoption to Every Blockchain - Dr. Junda Liu, Co-founder, Celer Network 2:31:56 ONI - A Sharing Infrastructure & Platform - Fu Xiang, Senior System Engineer, Onchain --- Break --- 4:06:58 Distributing Finance for Everyone - Fabio C.Canesin, Co-founder, CoZ and Nash 4:22:16 RegTech for the Smart Economy - Stephen Hyduchak; Alex Guba 4:36:28 The Moonlight Project and Its Future - Alan Fong, Co-Founder, Moonlight.io 4:53:33 Build & Publish Blockchain Game with BlaCat - Sean Chen, Founder, Blacat 5:14:22 Panel: About Blockchain Game - Peterson; Deshpande; Rong; Chen; Rayman 5:34:33 Guardian Circle - Mark Jeffrey, Co-Founder and CEO, Guardian Circle 5:47:10 Owning Your Data - Jonathan Meiri -CEO and Founder, Barrel Protocol --- Break --- 6:20:55 Embrace the New Economy - Joe Zhou, Co-founder, Jarvis+ 6:38:00 Designing a Blockchain-based File Storage System for NEO - Eric Wang, Co-founder, Archon 6:49:55 Stable Coin, an Infrastructure of Blockchain - Chris Qi, CTO, Alchemint 7:17:10 Panel:What You Should Know about STO - Beedham; Myint; Salant; Ng; Tong 7:41:17 How Regtech Prevents Cybercrime with Enhanced Visibility - Alek Tan, CEO, InnoDT Inc. 7:52:27 NEO Health Medical Encyclopedia - Dr. Brad Mattson, Founder, NEO Health For more info, please visit: https://devcon.neo.org/
Views: 7038 NEO Smart Economy
Google Cloud Next '18: Day 2 Featured Spotlight Sessions
 
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Join us on July 24-26th to learn about the latest Google Cloud innovations and get an insider's view of Next 18. Featuring: Spotlight Sessions on topics and ideas that can help you build and grow your business. 11.00AM–11.50AM: Adding Intelligence and Agility to Your Enterprise with SAP and Google Cloud Platform 12.35PM–1.25PM: Leveraging Data to Capitalize on the Integrated Marketplace 1.55PM–2.45PM: Security and Trust for Google Cloud 3.15PM–4.05PM: Demystifying the Intelligent Enterprise 4.35PM–5.25PM: Intelligent Internet of Things: Google Cloud's IoT Vision Learn more and view the event schedule → http://g.co/next18 Subscribe to the Google Cloud channel → http://bit.ly/NextSub
Views: 4988 Google Cloud
This week in Bitcoin- 8-4-2017- BTC Segwit, Bcash, Africa cryptocurrency news
 
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Samson Mow, Lorien Gamaroff, and Ansel Lindner talk about Bitcoin clones, Africa, Segwit, and more! Fun cryptocurrency times and lively discussion. What a great group of guests! CORRECTION- BCH is now on Shapeshift! Ansel- https://twitter.com/ansellindner Samson- https://twitter.com/excellion Lorien- https://www.youtube.com/user/gamaroff/videos CNBC- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKkiUgmdJEw Last week in Bitcoin show- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rldHlWJani8 Email the Disrupt Meister intern- [email protected] and tell us why you want to be an intern! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CryptoHWwallet affiliate link- https://www.cryptohwwallet.com?acc=a87ff679a2f3e71d9181a67b7542122c MeisterFreeHW1Over200" This is the coupon that is for people who spends over $200 (exclude shipping) to get a free H.W1. Ledger hardware wallet. Limit 10 pcs only coupon use at first, first come first serve basis only. 1 per customer for up to 10 uses. "MeisterFreeTShirtNoPurchaseNeeded" free Tshirt with no purchase necessary. buyers need to add the tshirt into the shopping cart, Apply coupon, it'll deduct $7.99 from total which leaves $5.00 to be paid for Shipping Shirts could run out so there might be shipping delays. . There are total 6 crptocurrencies. Bitcoin, Dash, Litecoin, Ethereum, Zcash and Monero. BUY Cryptograffiti shirts here and use the "Meister" discount code to get 10% off anything in the store! http://www.cryptograffiti.com/merchandise/ : UPVOTE THIS- https://steemit.com/bitcoin/@bitcoinmeister/bitcoin-forks-are-the-new-icos-be-safe-and-have-patience-with-bcash-cnbc-pumps-litecoin Buy your Bitcoin Trezor storage device here: https://shop.trezor.io/?a=c81d29b7bbf1 Buy Bitcoin at Coinbase here: https://www.coinbase.com/join/528aa4ec443594782100003a CryptoHWwallet affiliate link- https://www.cryptohwwallet.com?acc=a87ff679a2f3e71d9181a67b7542122c Adam's Twitter- https://twitter.com/TechBalt Adam's Minds- https://www.minds.com/BitcoinMeister Support the cause if you like what I have to say: BTC: 124ZqLGRePVx4P6YSDLnzjETZ1ByFsDTfb ETC: 0x36ab30f3ef5165e29b5fcefbc06511004c16ed31 Monero: 47MnZvoKVeZL4xhczW3t7zTnHQhJ3wkJ2Yxgyh2iWKTDhqrvdxjg41xZXrJhzn4yXxGVCJyNBroxK738rHKfGPWkQRQ2jj1 LTC: LcCYcbdFUR5W9rWbozmUrmhtsp89syKnbX ETH: 0x7386dbca3e8da787cc39190802fcba85a07ea5a9 DASH: Xjcpo8Lh6NKQoV3F12pGpXUiK4XRoQyudN Decred: Dsoq2ZPcqQDj5TSBLMAFX2SxCMHaYFnDty4 I ACCEPT EVERY ALTCOIN! This video explains what to do to get me to list, talk about, and create a payment address for your favorite Altcoin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VD9GOslS4zg Very Important Bitcoin and Altcoin storage video you need to watch- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aulSblKDeIU My latest Steemit post: https://steemit.com/bitcoin/@bitcoinmeister/btc-e-bitcoin-exchange-closure-is-an-avoidable-risk-reminder-monero-litecoin My Steemit page: https://steemit.com/@bitcoinmeister https://www.youtube.com/c/BitcoinMeister http://disruptmeister.com/ Value of every cryptocurrency- https://coinmarketcap.com Watch more of my Bitcoin videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLgyAakZPtCVQKl6naVHUfOiICFG8BYMp Adam Meister is available for an hour long Bitcoin/cryptocurrency consultation where he can walk you through the Trezor installation process and help you move your Bitcoins to the Trezor. He will answer all your questions in that hour. Trezor is just one Bitcoin topic that Adam can help you with, you can ask his advice on anything cryptocurrency related. From marketing and promotion to Altcoins to storage and the buy and hold philosophy. Adam's hourly rate is 0.15 Bitcoin. Feel free to email: Adam AT TrezorHelp DOT com to set up a Skype/phone consultation or to arrange an in person appearance or speaking engagement. Adam is available to speak at conferences around the world. Follow Adam on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/TechBalt Buy your Bitcoin Trezor storage device here: https://shop.trezor.io/?a=c81d29b7bbf1
Views: 2161 BitcoinMeister
Breaking the Code: from Enigma to your Cashpoint Card and Many Centuries Back
 
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A public lecture on the emergence of machine assisted cryptanalysis, which includes World War II and the breaking of the Enigma machine at Bletchley Park. Given by the University of York's Department of Computer Science Deputy Head of Department for Research, Professor John Clark.
Views: 2601 University of York
Security (computing) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_security 00:00:42 1 Vulnerabilities and attacks 00:01:30 1.1 Backdoor 00:02:04 1.2 Denial-of-service attacks 00:03:01 1.3 Direct-access attacks 00:03:43 1.4 Eavesdropping 00:04:23 1.5 Multivector, polymorphic attacks 00:04:50 1.6 Phishing 00:05:23 1.7 Privilege escalation 00:05:54 1.8 Social engineering 00:06:40 1.9 Spoofing 00:07:34 1.10 Tampering 00:07:55 2 Information security culture 00:09:54 3 Systems at risk 00:10:15 3.1 Financial systems 00:11:03 3.2 Utilities and industrial equipment 00:11:53 3.3 Aviation 00:12:49 3.4 Consumer devices 00:13:43 3.5 Large corporations 00:15:08 3.6 Automobiles 00:16:28 3.7 Government 00:17:04 3.8 Internet of things and physical vulnerabilities 00:18:15 3.8.1 Medical systems 00:19:01 3.9 Energy sector 00:19:52 4 Impact of security breaches 00:21:22 5 Attacker motivation 00:22:17 6 Computer protection (countermeasures) 00:22:47 6.1 Security by design 00:24:28 6.2 Security architecture 00:25:42 6.3 Security measures 00:28:25 6.4 Vulnerability management 00:29:14 6.5 Reducing vulnerabilities 00:30:57 6.6 Hardware protection mechanisms 00:34:14 6.7 Secure operating systems 00:35:16 6.8 Secure coding 00:35:50 6.9 Capabilities and access control lists 00:37:05 6.10 End user security training 00:38:20 6.11 Response to breaches 00:40:32 6.12 Types of security and privacy 00:41:26 7 Incident response planning 00:43:24 8 Notable attacks and breaches 00:43:41 8.1 Robert Morris and the first computer worm 00:44:23 8.2 Rome Laboratory 00:45:11 8.3 TJX customer credit card details 00:45:39 8.4 Stuxnet attack 00:46:09 8.5 Global surveillance disclosures 00:46:44 8.6 Target and Home Depot breaches 00:47:47 8.7 Office of Personnel Management data breach 00:48:38 8.8 Ashley Madison breach 00:49:29 9 Legal issues and global regulation 00:50:37 10 Role of government 00:51:57 11 International actions 00:52:58 11.1 Europe 00:53:46 12 National actions 00:53:56 12.1 Computer emergency response teams 00:54:13 12.2 Canada 00:55:42 12.3 China 00:56:45 12.4 Germany 00:57:46 12.5 India 00:58:51 12.6 South Korea 00:59:26 12.7 United States 00:59:35 12.7.1 Legislation 01:00:50 12.7.2 Agencies 01:03:46 12.7.3 Computer emergency readiness team 01:04:26 13 Modern warfare 01:05:26 14 Careers 01:06:23 14.1 Security analyst 01:07:05 14.2 Security engineer 01:07:36 14.3 Security architect 01:07:55 14.4 Security administrator 01:08:15 14.5 Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) 01:08:36 14.6 Chief Security Officer (CSO) 01:08:56 14.7 Security Consultant/Specialist/Intelligence 01:10:05 15 Terminology 01:14:52 16 Scholars Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9816609836047523 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the protection of computer systems from theft or damage to their hardware, software or electronic data, as well as from disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. The field is growing in importance due to increasing reliance on computer systems, the Internet and wireless networks such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and due to the growth of "smart" devices, including smartphones, televisions and the various tiny devices that constitute the Internet of things. Due to its complexity, both in terms of politics and technology, it is also one of the major challenges of the contemporary world.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Bitcoin Security  Bubble Boy and the Sewer Rat
 
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Original file: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=810aKcfM__Q
이더리움이란? 창시자 Vitalik Buterin의 총정리 (25분)
 
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가상화폐 교육을 한국어 자막을 무료로 제작하였습니다 by Blockbridge.io (BlockBridge Partners). 만약 영어자막이 나오신다면 설정에 들어가셔서 한글자막으로 교체하시면 됩니다. 가상화폐, 분산 네트워크, 블록체인의 대중화에 기여를 위해 이 채널은 상업화 하지 않습니다. 내용중에 궁금한 점이 있으시면 댓글 남겨주시면 대답 드리겠습니다. 아마 궁금한 점이 많으실 겁니다. 저희도 이해가 안되거든요. Attribution @ https://www.youtube.com/attribution?v=66SaEDzlmP4 @Ethereum Foundation We've also created an English transcription with our custom & real POS "software" built with minimum possible effort. It's marginally better than auto-transcript :) Hope it helps.
Views: 20 Blockbridge_io
CounterParty and the Asset Revolution with Chris DeRose at Coins in the Kingdom 2014
 
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Chris DeRose discusses the many uses of Counterparty assets, business models, and programming options in front of a live audience at the Coins in the Kingdom conference on October 5th, 2014.
Views: 2916 Bitcoin Florida
Radar | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Radar Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Radar is a detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II. A key development was the cavity magnetron in the UK, which allowed the creation of relatively small systems with sub-meter resolution. The term RADAR was coined in 1940 by the United States Navy as an acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging or RAdio Direction And Ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as a common noun, losing all capitalization. The modern uses of radar are highly diverse, including air and terrestrial traffic control, radar astronomy, air-defence systems, antimissile systems, marine radars to locate landmarks and other ships, aircraft anticollision systems, ocean surveillance systems, outer space surveillance and rendezvous systems, meteorological precipitation monitoring, altimetry and flight control systems, guided missile target locating systems, ground-penetrating radar for geological observations, and range-controlled radar for public health surveillance. High tech radar systems are associated with digital signal processing, machine learning and are capable of extracting useful information from very high noise levels. Other systems similar to radar make use of other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. One example is "lidar", which uses predominantly infrared light from lasers rather than radio waves.
Views: 62 wikipedia tts
Digital computing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer 00:02:19 1 Etymology 00:04:16 2 History 00:04:25 2.1 Pre-20th century 00:09:53 2.2 First computing device 00:12:00 2.3 Analog computers 00:13:41 2.4 Digital computers 00:13:50 2.4.1 Electromechanical 00:15:47 2.4.2 Vacuum tubes and digital electronic circuits 00:20:14 2.5 Modern computers 00:20:23 2.5.1 Concept of modern computer 00:21:38 2.5.2 Stored programs 00:24:19 2.5.3 Transistors 00:25:57 2.5.4 Integrated circuits 00:28:08 2.6 Mobile computers 00:29:16 3 Types 00:29:29 3.1 Based on uses 00:29:44 3.2 Based on sizes 00:30:12 4 Hardware 00:30:42 4.1 History of computing hardware 00:30:52 4.2 Other hardware topics 00:31:52 4.3 Input devices 00:32:45 4.4 Output devices 00:33:14 4.5 Control unit 00:36:00 4.6 Central processing unit (CPU) 00:36:33 4.7 Arithmetic logic unit (ALU) 00:38:23 4.8 Memory 00:42:44 4.9 Input/output (I/O) 00:43:58 4.10 Multitasking 00:46:09 4.11 Multiprocessing 00:47:33 5 Software 00:48:36 5.1 Languages 00:48:56 5.2 Application Software 00:49:05 5.3 Programs 00:50:12 5.3.1 Stored program architecture 00:52:47 5.3.2 Machine code 00:55:05 5.3.3 Programming language 00:55:49 5.3.3.1 Low-level languages 00:56:23 5.3.3.2 High-level languages/third generation language 00:57:43 5.3.4 Fourth-generation languages 00:58:09 5.3.5 Program design 00:59:20 5.3.6 Bugs 01:00:37 6 Firmware 01:01:02 7 Networking and the Internet 01:03:10 8 Unconventional computers 01:04:03 9 Unconventional computing 01:04:44 10 Future 01:05:29 10.1 Computer architecture paradigms 01:06:57 10.2 Artificial intelligence 01:07:59 11 Professions and organizations Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8853145694054065 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically via computer programming. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer-aided design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms. More sophisticated electrical machines did specialized analog calculations in the early 20th century. The first digital electronic calculating machines were developed during World War II. The speed, power, and versatility of computers have been increasing dramatically ever since then. Conventionally, a modern computer consists of at least one processing element, typically a central processing unit (CPU), and some form of memory. The processing element carries out arithmetic and logical operations, and a sequencing and control unit can change the order of operations in response to stored information. Peripheral devices include input devices (keyboards, mice, joystick, etc.), output devices (monitor screens, printers, etc.), and input/output devices that perform both functions (e.g., the 2000s-era touchscreen). Peripheral devices allow information to be retrieved from an external source and they enable the result of operations to be saved and retrieved.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Electronic computer | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:19:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer 00:02:48 1 Etymology 00:05:05 2 History 00:05:14 2.1 Pre-20th century 00:11:48 2.2 First computing device 00:14:21 2.3 Analog computers 00:16:22 2.4 Digital computers 00:16:31 2.4.1 Electromechanical 00:18:50 2.4.2 Vacuum tubes and digital electronic circuits 00:24:12 2.5 Modern computers 00:24:22 2.5.1 Concept of modern computer 00:25:49 2.5.2 Stored programs 00:29:03 2.5.3 Transistors 00:30:59 2.5.4 Integrated circuits 00:33:36 2.6 Mobile computers 00:34:56 3 Types 00:35:11 3.1 Based on uses 00:35:28 3.2 Based on sizes 00:36:00 4 Hardware 00:36:36 4.1 History of computing hardware 00:36:47 4.2 Other hardware topics 00:37:56 4.3 Input devices 00:39:00 4.4 Output devices 00:39:34 4.5 Control unit 00:42:53 4.6 Central processing unit (CPU) 00:43:30 4.7 Arithmetic logic unit (ALU) 00:45:42 4.8 Memory 00:50:52 4.9 Input/output (I/O) 00:52:20 4.10 Multitasking 00:54:56 4.11 Multiprocessing 00:56:36 5 Software 00:57:52 5.1 Languages 00:58:14 5.2 Programs 00:59:32 5.2.1 Stored program architecture 01:02:37 5.2.2 Machine code 01:05:22 5.2.3 Programming language 01:06:14 5.2.3.1 Low-level languages 01:06:53 5.2.3.2 High-level languages 01:08:27 5.2.4 Program design 01:09:52 5.2.5 Bugs 01:11:23 6 Networking and the Internet 01:13:56 7 Unconventional computers 01:14:58 8 Future 01:15:51 8.1 Computer architecture paradigms 01:17:37 8.2 Artificial intelligence 01:18:50 9 Professions and organizations Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7159018311870443 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically via computer programming. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer-aided design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms. More sophisticated electrical machines did specialized analog calculations in the early 20th century. The first digital electronic calculating machines were developed during World War II. The speed, power, and versatility of computers have been increasing dramatically ever since then. Conventionally, a modern computer consists of at least one processing element, typically a central processing unit (CPU), and some form of memory. The processing element carries out arithmetic and logical operations, and a sequencing and control unit can change the order of operations in response to stored information. Peripheral devices include input devices (keyboards, mice, joystick, etc.), output devices (monitor screens, printers, etc.), and input/output devices that perform both functions (e.g., the 2000s-era touchscreen). Peripheral devices allow information to be retrieved from an external source and they enable the result of operations to be saved and retrieved.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Computer insecurity | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:24:31
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_security 00:00:48 1 Vulnerabilities and attacks 00:01:42 1.1 Backdoor 00:02:20 1.2 Denial-of-service attacks 00:03:25 1.3 Direct-access attacks 00:04:12 1.4 Eavesdropping 00:04:57 1.5 Multivector, polymorphic attacks 00:05:26 1.6 Phishing 00:06:03 1.7 Privilege escalation 00:06:38 1.8 Social engineering 00:07:30 1.9 Spoofing 00:08:31 1.10 Tampering 00:08:54 2 Information security culture 00:11:08 3 Systems at risk 00:11:30 3.1 Financial systems 00:12:24 3.2 Utilities and industrial equipment 00:13:20 3.3 Aviation 00:14:24 3.4 Consumer devices 00:15:23 3.5 Large corporations 00:17:00 3.6 Automobiles 00:18:30 3.7 Government 00:19:11 3.8 Internet of things and physical vulnerabilities 00:20:30 3.8.1 Medical systems 00:21:22 3.9 Energy sector 00:22:20 4 Impact of security breaches 00:24:02 5 Attacker motivation 00:25:05 6 Computer protection (countermeasures) 00:25:38 6.1 Security by design 00:27:32 6.2 Security architecture 00:28:55 6.3 Security measures 00:32:01 6.4 Vulnerability management 00:32:56 6.5 Reducing vulnerabilities 00:34:53 6.6 Hardware protection mechanisms 00:38:37 6.7 Secure operating systems 00:39:46 6.8 Secure coding 00:40:24 6.9 Capabilities and access control lists 00:41:49 6.10 End user security training 00:43:15 6.11 Response to breaches 00:45:44 6.12 Types of security and privacy 00:46:43 7 Incident response planning 00:48:59 8 Notable attacks and breaches 00:49:16 8.1 Robert Morris and the first computer worm 00:50:03 8.2 Rome Laboratory 00:50:57 8.3 TJX customer credit card details 00:51:27 8.4 Stuxnet attack 00:52:00 8.5 Global surveillance disclosures 00:52:39 8.6 Target and Home Depot breaches 00:53:49 8.7 Office of Personnel Management data breach 00:54:47 8.8 Ashley Madison breach 00:55:43 9 Legal issues and global regulation 00:57:00 10 Role of government 00:58:32 11 International actions 00:59:41 11.1 Europe 01:00:35 12 National actions 01:00:45 12.1 Computer emergency response teams 01:01:03 12.2 Canada 01:02:45 12.3 China 01:03:55 12.4 Germany 01:05:04 12.5 India 01:06:17 12.6 South Korea 01:06:55 12.7 United States 01:07:04 12.7.1 Legislation 01:08:27 12.7.2 Agencies 01:11:47 12.7.3 Computer emergency readiness team 01:12:31 13 Modern warfare 01:13:39 14 Careers 01:14:42 14.1 Security analyst 01:15:29 14.2 Security engineer 01:16:04 14.3 Security architect 01:16:24 14.4 Security administrator 01:16:45 14.5 Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) 01:17:08 14.6 Chief Security Officer (CSO) 01:17:30 14.7 Security Consultant/Specialist/Intelligence 01:18:48 15 Terminology 01:24:17 16 Scholars Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.954540133231981 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the protection of computer systems from theft or damage to their hardware, software or electronic data, as well as from disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. The field is growing in importance due to increasing reliance on computer systems, the Internet and wireless networks such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and due to the growth of "smart" devices, including smartphones, televisions and the various tiny devices that constitute the Internet of things. Due to its complexity, both in terms of politics and technology, it is also one of the major challenges of the contemporary world.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
Digital computer | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:17:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer 00:02:41 1 Etymology 00:04:56 2 History 00:05:06 2.1 Pre-20th century 00:11:27 2.2 First computing device 00:13:54 2.3 Analog computers 00:15:50 2.4 Digital computers 00:15:59 2.4.1 Electromechanical 00:18:15 2.4.2 Vacuum tubes and digital electronic circuits 00:23:26 2.5 Modern computers 00:23:35 2.5.1 Concept of modern computer 00:25:01 2.5.2 Stored programs 00:28:07 2.5.3 Transistors 00:29:59 2.5.4 Integrated circuits 00:32:31 2.6 Mobile computers 00:33:49 3 Types 00:34:03 3.1 Based on uses 00:34:21 3.2 Based on sizes 00:34:53 4 Hardware 00:35:28 4.1 History of computing hardware 00:35:39 4.2 Other hardware topics 00:36:47 4.3 Input devices 00:37:49 4.4 Output devices 00:38:23 4.5 Control unit 00:41:36 4.6 Central processing unit (CPU) 00:42:13 4.7 Arithmetic logic unit (ALU) 00:44:21 4.8 Memory 00:49:20 4.9 Input/output (I/O) 00:50:45 4.10 Multitasking 00:53:16 4.11 Multiprocessing 00:54:53 5 Software 00:56:05 5.1 Languages 00:56:27 5.2 Programs 00:57:44 5.2.1 Stored program architecture 01:00:44 5.2.2 Machine code 01:03:23 5.2.3 Programming language 01:04:13 5.2.3.1 Low-level languages 01:04:51 5.2.3.2 High-level languages 01:06:21 5.2.4 Program design 01:07:42 5.2.5 Bugs 01:09:11 6 Networking and the Internet 01:11:38 7 Unconventional computers 01:12:39 8 Future 01:13:30 8.1 Computer architecture paradigms 01:15:13 8.2 Artificial intelligence 01:16:23 9 Professions and organizations Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7368160250160699 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically via computer programming. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer-aided design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms. More sophisticated electrical machines did specialized analog calculations in the early 20th century. The first digital electronic calculating machines were developed during World War II. The speed, power, and versatility of computers have been increasing dramatically ever since then. Conventionally, a modern computer consists of at least one processing element, typically a central processing unit (CPU), and some form of memory. The processing element carries out arithmetic and logical operations, and a sequencing and control unit can change the order of operations in response to stored information. Peripheral devices include input devices (keyboards, mice, joystick, etc.), output devices (monitor screens, printers, etc.), and input/output devices that perform both functions (e.g., the 2000s-era touchscreen). Peripheral devices allow information to be retrieved from an external source and they enable the result of operations to be saved and retrieved.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Week 0
 
45:50
An introduction to CS50! A video to get to know the staff, David walks us through what we can expect this coming year, some fun with the binary bulbs, and a chance to meet the staff in person.
Views: 456680 CS50
PlayStation Live From E3 Day 1
 
07:38:44
#PlayStationE3 continues with live programming all day Tuesday. Here’s what’s coming up: 11:00 AM - The Last of Us Part II | E3 Coliseum Panel 12:00 PM - Ghost of Tsushima | Gameplay Rewind 12:15 PM - Dreams | Live Gameplay Demo 12:45 PM - Spyro Reignited Trilogy | Live Gameplay Demo 1:00 PM - Days Gone | Live Gameplay Demo 1:15 PM - The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit 1:30 PM - Marvel’s Spider-Man | Live Gameplay Demo 2:00 PM - Concrete Genie | Live Gameplay Demo 2:15 PM - Kingdom Hearts 3 | Developer Interview 2:30 PM - Assassin’s Creed Odyssey | Developer Interview 2:45 PM - Hitman 2 | Developer Interview 3:00 PM - Death Stranding | E3 Coliseum Panel 4:00 PM - Resident Evil 2 | Live Gameplay Demo 4:15 PM - Trover Save the Universe | Justin Roiland Interview 4:45 PM - Nioh 2 | Developer Interview 5:00 PM - Anthem | Developer Interview 5:15 PM - Days Gone | Developer Interview 5:30 PM - Scuf Vantage Controller Unboxing 5:45 PM - Just Cause 4 | Developer Interview 6:15 PM - Shadow of the Tomb Raider | Developer Interview 6:30 PM - Call of Duty: Black Ops IIII | Developer Interview
Views: 688823 PlayStation
Steve Garrity: Impact: Stanford Entrepreneurship and Innovation [Entire Talk]
 
01:00:44
This special presentation features a panel of Stanford alumni reflecting on their personal entrepreneurial experiences at Stanford and in the vibrant Silicon Valley ecosystem. This conversation follows a presentation of remarkable results from the Stanford Innovation Survey, measuring the economic impact of Stanford alumni engaged in entrepreneurial activity. View more clips and share your comments at http://ecorner.stanford.edu/authorMaterialInfo.html?mid=3017
Views: 1343 Stanford eCorner
Timeline of United States inventions (1946–91) | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:14:00
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Timeline of United States inventions (1946–91) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A timeline of United States inventions (1946–1991) encompasses the ingenuity and innovative advancements of the United States within a historical context, dating from the era of the Cold War, which have been achieved by inventors who are either native-born or naturalized citizens of the United States. Copyright protection secures a person's right to his or her first-to-invent claim of the original invention in question, highlighted in Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution which gives the following enumerated power to the United States Congress: In 1641, the first patent in North America was issued to Samuel Winslow by the General Court of Massachusetts for a new method of making salt. On April 10, 1790, President George Washington signed the Patent Act of 1790 (1 Stat. 109) into law which proclaimed that patents were to be authorized for "any useful art, manufacture, engine, machine, or device, or any improvement therein not before known or used." On July 31, 1790, Samuel Hopkins of Pittsford, Vermont became the first person in the United States to file and to be granted a patent for an improved method of "Making Pot and Pearl Ashes." The Patent Act of 1836 (Ch. 357, 5 Stat. 117) further clarified United States patent law to the extent of establishing a patent office where patent applications are filed, processed, and granted, contingent upon the language and scope of the claimant's invention, for a patent term of 14 years with an extension of up to an additional 7 years. However, the Uruguay Round Agreements Act of 1994 (URAA) changed the patent term in the United States to a total of 20 years, effective for patent applications filed on or after June 8, 1995, thus bringing United States patent law further into conformity with international patent law. The modern-day provisions of the law applied to inventions are laid out in Title 35 of the United States Code (Ch. 950, sec. 1, 66 Stat. 792). From 1836 to 2011, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a total of 7,861,317 patents relating to several well-known inventions appearing throughout the timeline below. Some examples of patented inventions between the years 1946 and 1991 include William Shockley's transistor (1947), John Blankenbaker's personal computer (1971), Vinton Cerf's and Robert Kahn's Internet protocol/TCP (1973), and Martin Cooper's mobile phone (1973).
Views: 246 wikipedia tts
Computer security | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:27:56
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_security 00:00:50 1 Vulnerabilities and attacks 00:01:45 1.1 Backdoor 00:02:25 1.2 Denial-of-service attacks 00:03:31 1.3 Direct-access attacks 00:04:20 1.4 Eavesdropping 00:05:06 1.5 Multivector, polymorphic attacks 00:05:36 1.6 Phishing 00:06:14 1.7 Privilege escalation 00:06:50 1.8 Social engineering 00:07:44 1.9 Spoofing 00:08:48 1.10 Tampering 00:09:11 2 Information security culture 00:11:34 3 Systems at risk 00:11:57 3.1 Financial systems 00:12:52 3.2 Utilities and industrial equipment 00:13:50 3.3 Aviation 00:14:56 3.4 Consumer devices 00:15:56 3.5 Large corporations 00:17:37 3.6 Automobiles 00:19:10 3.7 Government 00:19:52 3.8 Internet of things and physical vulnerabilities 00:21:15 3.8.1 Medical systems 00:22:09 3.9 Energy sector 00:23:09 4 Impact of security breaches 00:24:54 5 Attacker motivation 00:25:59 6 Computer protection (countermeasures) 00:26:33 6.1 Security by design 00:28:32 6.2 Security architecture 00:29:58 6.3 Security measures 00:33:12 6.4 Vulnerability management 00:34:10 6.5 Reducing vulnerabilities 00:36:12 6.6 Hardware protection mechanisms 00:40:05 6.7 Secure operating systems 00:41:18 6.8 Secure coding 00:41:58 6.9 Capabilities and access control lists 00:43:25 6.10 End user security training 00:44:54 6.11 Response to breaches 00:47:31 6.12 Types of security and privacy 00:48:36 7 Incident response planning 00:50:57 8 Notable attacks and breaches 00:51:14 8.1 Robert Morris and the first computer worm 00:52:03 8.2 Rome Laboratory 00:53:00 8.3 TJX customer credit card details 00:53:30 8.4 Stuxnet attack 00:54:04 8.5 Global surveillance disclosures 00:54:44 8.6 Target and Home Depot breaches 00:55:58 8.7 Office of Personnel Management data breach 00:56:58 8.8 Ashley Madison breach 00:57:57 9 Legal issues and global regulation 00:59:16 10 Role of government 01:00:53 11 International actions 01:02:06 11.1 Europe 01:03:03 12 National actions 01:03:13 12.1 Computer emergency response teams 01:03:31 12.2 Canada 01:05:17 12.3 China 01:06:30 12.4 Germany 01:07:42 12.5 India 01:08:59 12.6 South Korea 01:09:39 12.7 United States 01:09:48 12.7.1 Legislation 01:11:16 12.7.2 Agencies 01:14:46 12.7.3 Computer emergency readiness team 01:15:32 13 Modern warfare 01:16:42 14 Careers 01:17:47 14.1 Security analyst 01:18:35 14.2 Security engineer 01:19:11 14.3 Security architect 01:19:31 14.4 Security administrator 01:19:52 14.5 Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) 01:20:16 14.6 Chief Security Officer (CSO) 01:20:39 14.7 Security Consultant/Specialist/Intelligence 01:21:59 15 Terminology 01:27:42 16 Scholars Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7252017000131898 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the protection of computer systems from theft or damage to their hardware, software or electronic data, as well as from disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. The field is growing in importance due to increasing reliance on computer systems, the Internet and wireless networks such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and due to the growth of "smart" devices, including smartphones, televisions and the various tiny devices that constitute the Internet of things. Due to its complexity, both in terms of politics and technology, it is also one of the major challenges of the contemporary world.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
Google DC Talks: "Developing a Natl Cybersecurity Strategy"
 
01:26:49
As part of the Google D.C. Talks series, and in partnership with the Center for a New American Security, Google's Washington office hosted a discussion entitled, "Developing a National Cybersecurity Strategy." Dr. Kristin Lord of CNAS offered opening remarks on cybersecurity policy, and Harry Wingo of Google moderated a five-person panel: * Ellen Doneski, Chief of Staff, U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation * Liesyl Franz, Vice President for Information Security and Global Public Policy, TechAmerica * Richard Hale, Chief Information Assurance Executive, Defense Information Systems Agency * Christopher Painter, Director of Cybersecurity, National Security Council * Philip Reitinger, Deputy Undersecretary of National Protection & Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security This event took place on June 26, 2009 at Google's offices in Washington, D.C.
Views: 12282 Google
Natural computing | Wikipedia audio article
 
39:02
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_computing 00:02:46 1 Nature-inspired models of computation 00:03:33 1.1 Cellular automata 00:04:47 1.2 Neural computation 00:08:16 1.3 Evolutionary computation 00:11:48 1.4 Swarm intelligence 00:14:08 1.5 Artificial immune systems 00:15:34 1.6 Membrane computing 00:17:36 1.7 Amorphous computing 00:18:51 2 Synthesizing nature by means of computing 00:19:03 2.1 Artificial life 00:21:31 3 Nature-inspired novel hardware 00:22:07 3.1 Molecular computing 00:25:40 3.2 Quantum computing 00:27:57 4 Nature as information processing 00:28:29 4.1 Systems biology 00:33:43 4.2 Synthetic biology 00:36:13 4.3 Cellular computing 00:38:30 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7677558205663949 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Natural computing, also called natural computation, is a terminology introduced to encompass three classes of methods: 1) those that take inspiration from nature for the development of novel problem-solving techniques; 2) those that are based on the use of computers to synthesize natural phenomena; and 3) those that employ natural materials (e.g., molecules) to compute. The main fields of research that compose these three branches are artificial neural networks, evolutionary algorithms, swarm intelligence, artificial immune systems, fractal geometry, artificial life, DNA computing, and quantum computing, among others. Computational paradigms studied by natural computing are abstracted from natural phenomena as diverse as self-replication, the functioning of the brain, Darwinian evolution, group behavior, the immune system, the defining properties of life forms, cell membranes, and morphogenesis. Besides traditional electronic hardware, these computational paradigms can be implemented on alternative physical media such as biomolecules (DNA, RNA), or trapped-ion quantum computing devices. Dually, one can view processes occurring in nature as information processing. Such processes include self-assembly, developmental processes, gene regulation networks, protein–protein interaction networks, biological transport (active transport, passive transport) networks, and gene assembly in unicellular organisms. Efforts to understand biological systems also include engineering of semi-synthetic organisms, and understanding the universe itself from the point of view of information processing. Indeed, the idea was even advanced that information is more fundamental than matter or energy. The Zuse-Fredkin thesis, dating back to the 1960s, states that the entire universe is a huge cellular automaton which continuously updates its rules. Recently it has been suggested that the whole universe is a quantum computer that computes its own behaviour.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
NITRD Cybersecurity and CPS Panel, 2014 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
 
01:39:46
Federal NITRD Program's panel on Cybersecurity and Cyber-Physical Systems at the 2014 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. Panelists from DHS, NIST, NSF, SRI International, and University of Connecticut discussed cybersecurity challenges of CPS and prospective research directions for solving those challenges. For more information, visit: http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2014/index.html
Views: 424 NITRD Program
The Future of FinTech - FUTURE FORUM
 
02:20:02
Speaker BIOS: http://www.tinyurl.com/ybpblw9u Global investment in financial technology (FinTech) ventures reached $25 billion in 2016, clearly signifying that the digital revolution has taken root in the financial services sector. www.YouTube.com/csuDHTV - Please Subscribe Nearly every sector of the financial services industry has been disrupted by technology. This digital disruption has the potential to shrink the role and relevance of today’s banks, and simultaneously help them create better, faster, cheaper services that make them an even more essential part of everyday life for institutions and individuals. FinTech’s evolution has revealed both the benefits and shortcomings of technology’s disruption of the financial services industry. While the processes are easier and more transparent, there are still some parts that are dependent on human interaction. It remains unclear whether this presents more of a challenge or an opportunity for industry incumbents, but established financial services players are starting to take bold steps to engage with emerging innovations.
Views: 94 csuDHTV
Internet Technologies - Computer Science for Business Leaders 2016
 
01:26:10
DHCP, DNS, TCP/IP, VPNs, Wi-Fi; HTTP, HTTPS; hosts, registrars
Views: 39190 CS50
Microsoft Azure OpenDev—June 2017
 
03:28:05
This first-ever virtual event from Microsoft showcasing open source technologies in the cloud is hosted by John Gossman, Lead Architect of Microsoft Azure, and features industry thought leaders including Mark Shuttleworth of Canonical and speakers from Docker, Pivotal, Red Hat, and Chef—as well as Microsoft teams dedicated to open source. • Use containers to build microservice-based solutions on Azure, in Java, Node.js, and more. • Use existing open source skills and tools to enable your DevOps pipeline in the cloud. • Modernize your existing apps and implement community best practices. See what's possible with open source solutions.
Views: 10728 Microsoft Azure