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Lattice-Based Cryptography
 
01:12:48
Most modern cryptography, and public-key crypto in particular, is based on mathematical problems that are conjectured to be infeasible (e.g., factoring large integers). Unfortunately, standard public-key techniques are often too inefficient to be employed in many environments; moreover, all commonly used schemes can in principle be broken by quantum computers. This talk will review my recent work on developing new mathematical foundations for cryptography, using geometric objects called lattices. Compared to more conventional proposals, lattice-based schemes offer a host of potential advantages: they are simple and highly parallelizable, they can be proved secure under mild worst-case hardness assumptions, and they remain unbroken by quantum algorithms. Due to the entirely different underlying mathematics, however, realizing even the most basic cryptographic notions has been a major challenge. Surprisingly, I will show that lattice-based schemes are also remarkably flexible and expressive, and that many important cryptographic goals can be achieved --- sometimes even more simply and efficiently than with conventional approaches. Some of our schemes provide interesting twists on old and cherished cryptographic notions, while others introduce entirely new concepts altogether.
Views: 2466 Microsoft Research
Introduction to quantum cryptography - Vadim Makarov
 
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I introduce the basic principles of quantum cryptography, and discuss today's status of its technology, with examples of optical schemes and components. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is required :). This first lecture is about the basics of quantum cryptography. Lectures 2 and 3 cover quantum hacking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2r7B8Zpxmcw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sc_cJiLFQZ0 Presentation slides of the entire lecture course can be downloaded at: Power Point (95 MiB, with videos and animations) - http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140801-IQC-short-course.pptx PDF (14.8 MiB, static images only) - http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140801-IQC-short-course.pdf Vadim Makarov is a research assistant professor at the Institute for Quantum Computing, heading the Quantum hacking lab - http://www.vad1.com/lab/ This course was part of a lecture series hosted by CryptoWorks21 in August 2014 in Waterloo, Canada. Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-quantum-computing/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
Lattice-Based Cryptography
 
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We will give a survey of recent work on lattice-based cryptography, mainly focusing on the so-called Learning with Errors (LWE) problem. This problem has turned out to be an amazingly versatile basis for cryptographic constructions, with tens of applications, including the recent celebrated work on fully homomorphic encryption. In addition to applications, we will also mention very recent work providing a better understanding of the security of the problem. The talk does not require any prior knowledge in cryptography or in lattices.
Views: 3293 Microsoft Research
Quantum cryptography: basics and technology with Vadim Makarov
 
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This is a basic introduction into quantum key distribution technology, accessible to undergraduate students and above. The lecture explains society's need for this technology, how quantum cryptography works, shows today's commercial and research hardware, and touches on the question of hacking attacks against it. Download presentation slides: PowerPoint (63 MiB, with videos and animations) http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140930-UWaterloo-phys10-undergrad-seminar.pptx PDF (6.8 MiB, static images only) http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140930-UWaterloo-phys10-undergrad-seminar.pdf This lecture was given at University of Waterloo undergraduate physics seminar (Phys10) on September 30th, 2014. If you are more interested in quantum cryptography technology and have more time, consider watching a longer lecture series by Vadim Makarov: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToOLbdrWst4 Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-quantum-computing/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
What is cryptography?
 
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A very short introduction to the science of cryptography by Jamie Sikora, a mathematician and Research Fellow at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore.
IBM Research 5 in 5 Science Slam: Lattice Cryptography
 
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During the IBM Research 5 in 5 Science Slam at IBM Think 2018, IBM researcher Cecilia Boschini explains one of the technologies that will change the world in the next five years: lattice cryptography. Learn more at http://ibm.biz/five-in-five.
Views: 3112 IBM Research
Cryptography Primer Session 2 – Symmetric Primitives
 
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This will be the second of six cryptography primer sessions exploring the basics of modern cryptography. In this session, we’ll explore symmetric ciphers, primitives, and protocols – including AES, cipher modes, hash functions, and message authentication. Subsequent sessions (on alternating Fridays) are expected to include the following topics. Depending on the interests of the participants, other topics may be included or substituted. • Integer asymmetric functions including BigNums, Diffie-Hellman, RSA, and DSA • Non-integer asymmetric functions including elliptic curves and lattice-based systems • Protocol properties including forward secrecy, crypto agility, and certificate management • Applications including zero-knowledge, secret sharing, homomorphic encryption, and election protocols
Views: 185 Microsoft Research
NIST Calls Development of Quantum Proof Encryption Algorithms
 
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#United States' National Institute of Standards and #Technology "With the public's participation," #NIST's Cryptographic Technology Group says in a blog post (https://goo.gl/DZRVhS), "NIST intends to spend the next few years gathering, testing and ultimately recommending new algorithms that would be less susceptible to a quantum computer's attack." The development of "new public-key cryptography standards will specify one or more additional unclassified, publicly disclosed digital signature, public-key encryption, and key establishment algorithms that are capable of protecting sensitive government information well into the foreseeable future, including after the advent of quantum computers," the agency says (https://goo.gl/8rnFmH). -------------------------------------- You can see the playlist: - Breaking news: https://goo.gl/wyqG6i - Life skills: https://goo.gl/UoRrct - SE Optimization: https://goo.gl/XDkc17 *Website: http://ictblogs.net/ *Facebook: http://facebook.com/vnwpages/ *Twitter: https://twitter.com/ictblogsnet
Views: 262 ICT Blog's
Cryptography Primer Session 4 Primes, Elliptic Curves, & Lattices
 
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This will be the fourth of six cryptography primer sessions exploring the basics of modern cryptography. In this session, we’ll explore primality testing, elliptic curve cryptosystems, and lattice-based cryptosystems. Subsequent sessions (on alternating Fridays) are expected to include the following topics. Depending on the interests of the participants, other topics may be included or substituted. Attacks, vulnerabilities, and practical considerations Applications including zero-knowledge, secret sharing, homomorphic encryption, and election protocols.
Views: 385 Microsoft Research
Post-quantum cryptography
 
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Due to their computing power, quantum computers have the disruptive potential to break various currently used encryption algorithms. Watch the video and see how we are securing the post quantum computer world.
Circular Encryption in Formal and Computational Cryptography - Bruce Kapron
 
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Bruce Kapron University of Victoria; Member, School of Mathematics March 25, 2014 The goal of computationally sound symbolic security is to create formal systems of cryptography which have a sound interpretation with respect to complexity-based notions of security. While there has been much progress in the development of such systems, one big impediment is the treatment of circular encryptions. In many typical symbolic systems, it is secure to encrypt a key by itself, but in the computational setting, standard notions of security break down in this case. There are now approaches to this problem from both sides. On the symbolic side, Miccianico (2010) presented a system in which adversarial knowledge is modeled co-inductively, and circular encryption is no longer symbolically secure. On the computational side, systems in which circular encryptions are secure have been developed based on standard hardness assumptions. I will survey the work described above, as well as presenting some recent results on extending Micciancio's system beyond the setting of passive eavesdropping adversaries (joint work with Mohammad Hajiabadi.) For more videos, visit http://video.ias.edu
Post-Quantum Cryptography Deep Dive
 
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This is the introductory lecture to the deep dive held on 10/8/17. You can find the complementary reading guide here: https://tinyurl.com/postquantum
FEAL
 
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FEAL In cryptography, FEAL (the Fast data Encipherment ALgorithm) is a block cipher proposed as an alternative to the Data Encryption Standard (DES), and designed to be much faster in software.The Feistel based algorithm was first published in 1987 by Akihiro Shimizu and Shoji Miyaguchi from NTT. =======Image-Copyright-Info======= Image is in public domainImage Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:FEAL_InfoBox_Diagram.png =======Image-Copyright-Info======== -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCONLYZyOdQ
Views: 232 WikiAudio
RSA Mobile Authentication Solution
 
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See how RSA Security Analytics helps security analysts detect and investigate threats often missed by other security tools and cut attacker free time from weeks to hours.
Views: 224 RSA
Introduction to the Post-Quantum Supersingular Isogeny Diffie-Hellman Protocol
 
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A talk given at the University of Waterloo on July 12th, 2016. The intended audience was mathematics students without necessarily any prior background in cryptography or elliptic curves. Apologies for the poor audio quality. Use subtitles if you can't hear.
Views: 1875 David Urbanik
RSA Authentifizierung
 
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Views: 907 alexkueck11
Post-Quantum Zero-Knowledge and Signatures from Symmetric-Key
 
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We propose a new class of post-quantum digital signature schemes that: (a) derive their security entirely from the security of symmetric-key primitives, believed to be quantum-secure, and (b) have extremely small keypairs, and, (c) are highly parametrizable. In our signature constructions, the public key is an image y=f(x) of a one-way function f and secret key x. A signature is a non-interactive zero-knowledge proof of x, that incorporates a message to be signed. For this proof, we leverage recent progress of Giacomelli et al. (USENIX'16) in constructing an efficient sigma protocol for statements over general circuits. We improve this sigma protocol to reduce proof sizes by a factor of two, at no additional computational cost. While this is of independent interest as it yields more compact proofs for any circuit, it also decreases our signature sizes. We consider two possibilities for making the proof non-interactive, the Fiat-Shamir transform, and Unruh's transform (EUROCRYPT'12,'15,'16). The former has smaller signatures, while the latter has a security analysis in the quantum-accessible random oracle model. By customizing Unruh's transform to our application, the overhead is reduced to 1.6x when compared to the Fiat-Shamir transform, which does not have a rigorous post-quantum security analysis. We implement and benchmark both approaches and explore the possible choice of f, taking advantage of the recent trend to strive for practical symmetric ciphers with a particularly low number of multiplications and end up using LowMC. This is joint work with Melissa Chase, David Derler, Steven Goldfeder, Claudio Orlandi, Christian Rechberger, Daniel Slamanig and Greg Zaverucha.  See more on this video at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/post-quantum-zero-knowledge-and-signatures-from-symmetric-key/
Views: 907 Microsoft Research
Strong Digital Signatures: The Lamport Advantage
 
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Signing and claiming ownership of data is a basic act in cyber space, especially to approve financial transactions, and verify critical instructions. The prevailing signatures today are based on algorithmic complexity, which is essentially a cryptanalytic minefield - vulnerable to weaponized math. Alternatively, we can rely on lavish use of randomness, and resurrect pre-complexity solutions. The forgotten Lamport signature is attracting new interest.
Views: 1801 Gideon Samid
The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography (1999)
 
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Simon Lehna Singh MBE (born 19 September 1964) is a British popular science author whose works largely contain a strong mathematical element. His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the United States titled Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem),[2][3] The Code Book[4] (about cryptography and its history), Big Bang[5] (about the Big Bang theory and the origins of the universe), Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial[6] (about complementary and alternative medicine, co-written by Edzard Ernst) and The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets (about mathematical ideas and theorems hidden in episodes of The Simpsons and Futurama).[7] In 2012 Singh founded the Good Thinking Society.[8] Singh has also produced documentaries and works for television to accompany his books, is a trustee of NESTA, the National Museum of Science and Industry and co-founded the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme. Singh's parents emigrated from Punjab, India to Britain in 1950. He is the youngest of three brothers, his eldest brother being Tom Singh, the founder of the UK New Look chain of stores. Singh grew up in Wellington, Somerset, attending Wellington School, and went on to Imperial College London, where he studied physics. He was active in the student union, becoming President of the Royal College of Science Union.[9] Later he completed a PhD degree in particle physics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge and at CERN, Geneva. In 1983, he was part of the UA2 experiment in CERN.[11] In 1987, Singh taught science at The Doon School, the independent all-boys' boarding school in India.[12] In 1990 Singh returned to England and joined the BBC's Science and Features Department, where he was a producer and director working on programmes such as Tomorrow's World and Horizon. Singh was introduced to Richard Wiseman through their collaboration onTomorrow's World. At Wiseman's suggestion, Singh directed a segment about politicians lying in different mediums, and getting the public's opinion on if the person was lying or not. After attending some of Wiseman's lectures, Singh came up with the idea to create a show together, and Theatre of Science was born. It was a way to deliver science to normal people in an entertaining manner. Richard Wiseman has influenced Singh in such a way that Singh states: My writing initially was about pure science but a lot of my research now has been inspired by his desire to debunk things such as the paranormal – we both hate psychics, mediums, pseudoscience in general.[13] Singh directed his BAFTA award-winning documentary about the world's most notorious mathematical problem entitled "Fermat's Last Theorem" in 1996. The film was memorable for its opening shot of a middle-aged mathematician, Andrew Wiles, holding back tears as he recalled the moment when he finally realised how to resolve the fundamental error in his proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. The documentary was originally transmitted in October 1997 as an edition of the BBC Horizon series. It was also aired in America as part of the NOVA series. The Proof, as it was re-titled, was nominated for an Emmy Award. The story of this celebrated mathematical problem was also the subject of Singh's first book, Fermat's last theorem. In 1997, he began working on his second book, The Code Book, a history of codes and codebreaking. As well as explaining the science of codes and describing the impact of cryptography on history, the book also contends that cryptography is more important today than ever before. The Code Book has resulted in a return to television for him. He presented The Science of Secrecy, a five-part series for Channel 4. The stories in the series range from the cipher that sealed the fate of Mary, Queen of Scots, to the coded Zimmermann Telegram that changed the course of the First World War. Other programmes discuss how two great 19th century geniuses raced to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphs and how modern encryption can guarantee privacy on the Internet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Singh Image: Sam Hughes [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 2252 Way Back
Ouroboros | IACR Crypto-2017
 
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Filmed on location at Crypto 2017, the 37th International Cryptology Conference. The event was held at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) August 20-24 2017. The academic program covers all aspects of cryptology. The conference is sponsored by the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR), in cooperation with the Computer Science Department of UCSB. https://www.iacr.org/conferences/crypto2017/ Developing a secure proof of stake algorithm is one of the big challenges in cryptocurrency, and a proposed solution to this problem won the attention of the academic community. Several hundred cryptographers from around the world arrived at the University of California Santa Barbara on Sunday for the flagship annual event of their field, Crypto 2017. Over several days, they present cutting edge research for the scrutiny of their peers, while in the evenings they continue discussions with friends and colleagues over dinner on the university campus, with the inspiring backdrop of the Santa Ynez mountains meeting the Pacific ocean behind them. https://iohk.io/press/ Ouroboros, developed by a team led by IOHK chief scientist Aggelos Kiayias, made it through a tough admission process for the prestigious conference. This year, 311 papers were submitted and of those 72 were accepted. Only three papers at the conference were on the subject of blockchain. All three papers were supported by IOHK funding. Speaking after his presentation, Professor Kiayias said: “We’re very happy that we had the opportunity to present Ouroboros at the conference. The protocol and especially its security analysis were very well received by fellow cryptographers.” “Our next steps will be to focus on the next version of the protocol, Ouroboros Praos which improves even further the security and performance characteristics of the protocol.” The Ouroboros protocol stands out as the first proof of stake algorithm that is provably secure, meaning that it offers security guarantees that are mathematically proven. This is essential for a protocol that is intended to be used in cryptocurrency, an infrastructure that must be relied on to carry billions of dollars worth of value. In addition to security, if blockchains are going to become infrastructure for new financial systems they must be able to comfortably handle millions of users. The key to scaling up is proof of stake, a far more energy efficient and cost effective algorithm, and as such this research represents a significant step forward in cryptography. Ouroboros also has the distinction of being implemented – the protocol will be an integral part of Cardano, a blockchain system currently in development. https://iohk.io/research/papers/#XJ6MHFXX https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ There were two other papers presented at the bitcoin session on Monday. The Bitcoin Backbone Protocol with Chains of Variable Difficulty, was produced by a team of three researchers and included Prof Kiayias. It is a continuation of previous research into Bitcoin, which was itself the first work to prove security properties of its blockchain. A third paper on the subject of bitcoin was presented, Bitcoin as a Transaction Ledger: A Composable Treatment. Other notable talks at the conference included a presentation by John Martinis, an expert on quantum computing and former physics professor at the University of California Santa Barbara, who is now working at Google to build a quantum computer. Leading cryptographers at the conference included Whitfield Diffie, pioneer of the public key cryptography that made Bitcoin possible, and Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman, who came up with the RSA public-key cryptosystem that is widely used for secure data transmission. https://www.forbes.com/sites/amycastor/2017/08/23/at-crypto-2017-blockchain-presentations-focus-on-proofs-not-concepts/#6e558d1a7b70 https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ https://iohk.io/team/bernardo-david/ https://iohk.io/team/peter-gazi/ -- Input Output See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ Read our papers: http://iohk.link/paper-ouroboros Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/ See more on Cardano: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ --
Views: 1570 IOHK
Simulating Quantum Field Theory with a Quantum Computer
 
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John Preskill, California Institute of Technology Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity Boot Camp http://simons.berkeley.edu/talks/john-preskill-2014-01-18
Views: 1247 Simons Institute
Post-Quantum Cryptography with Nick Sullivan and Adam Langley: GCPPodcast 123
 
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Original post: https://www.gcppodcast.com/post/episode-123-post-quantum-cryptography-with-nick-sullivan-and-adam-langley/ Nick Sullivan, and Adam Langley join Melanie and Mark to provide a pragmatic view on post-quantum cryptography and what it means to research security for the potential of quantum computing. Post-quantum cryptography is about developing algorithms that are resistant to quantum computers in conjunction with “classical” computers. It’s about looking at the full picture of potential threats and planning on how to address them using a diversity of types of mathematics in the research. Adam and Nick help clarify the different terminology and techniques that are applied in the research and give a practical understanding of what to expect from a security perspective.
Defn Isogeny
 
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Views: 577 Harpreet Bedi
Cisco Networking Solutions from Sirius
 
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Sirius is a Cisco Gold Partner and holds three Master Certifications including Master Managed Services, Master Security and Master Unified Communications -- the highest level of certifications within a Cisco partner. Sirius' Senior Vice President Craig Nelson, and his team discuss Cisco networking solutions and what sets Sirius apart from the competition. Sirius sets the bar for excellence in the technology industry by providing network design, implementation and support services for clients across the U.S.
Suppression law of quantum states in a 3D photonic fast Fourier transform chip
 
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Illustration of suppression law of quantum states in a 3-D photonic fast Fourier transform chip. Activity funded by the ERC project 3D-QUEST: 3D Quantum Integrated Optical Simulation (http://www.3dquest.eu) and the European project FETPROACT-3-2014 QUCHIP: Quantum Simulation on a Photonic Chip (http://www.quchip.eu). The experiment has been carried out in joint collaboration between Quantum Information Lab, Dipartimento di Fisica - Sapienza Università di Roma and Femtosecond Laser Micromachining group, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN) - CNR.
Quantum key distribution
 
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Views: 2 Trivia

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