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Top 10 MOST DEADLY MUSHROOMS IN THE WORLD
 
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Welcome to Top10Archive! Foraging for food was our ancestors way of survival and although throughout the years we've learned what and what not to eat, there are still those times where misclassification or contamination occurs - and sometimes, the results can be deadly. From Angel Wings to Death Caps, we're counting down the top 10 deadliest mushrooms... Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Gyromitra esculenta (False Morel) 9. Podostroma Cornu-damae 8. Pholiotina Rugosa (Conocybe Filaris) 7. Pleurocybella porrigens (Angel Wings) 6. Galerina marginata (Autumn Skullcap) 5. Lepiota brunneoincarnata (Deadly Dapperling) 4. Cortinarius Rubellus (Deadly Webcap) 3. Amanita Verna (Fool's Mushroom) 2. Amanita Virosa (Destroying Angel) 1. Amanita phalloides (Death Cap) Voice Over Talent: https://www.youtube.com/user/thought2/
Views: 1130619 Top 10 Archive
Chlorophyllum molybdites
 
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Commonly known as the Green spored parasol,.Poisonous and often mistaken for edible varieties. Prominent along the East Coast of Australia.
Views: 5334 JsunLau
Parasol Mushroom Identification, Macrolepiota procera
 
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Parasol Mushroom Identification, Macrolepiota procera
Views: 30883 Wild Food UK
Poisonous Yard Mushroom: The Green-spored Parasol: Retro-Mushroom Week #4
 
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A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science communication outreach via Patreon: http://bit.ly/2Sfmkph This is a re-release of a video I did on the mushroom channel. It seemed to help a lot of people looking at mushrooms in their yard so I hope it continues to be useful. The Green-Spored Parasol mushroom, Latin name Chlorophyllum molybdites, is responsible for many mushroom poisonings in the United States. David Arora, in his seminal work Mushrooms Demystified, claims that this mushroom causes more poisonings than any other species that grows in the U.S., and Dr. Michael Beug, a highly respected mycologist from Washington state, wrote a paper about mushroom poisoning and concluded that Green-Spored Parasols are indeed the cause of more poisonings than other North American fungi. Arora maintains this is largely because the Green-Spored Parasol is a common terrestrial species that grows abundantly in lawns, gardens, and other places where they’re tempting to people who would not normally hunt for edible fungi. Our Executive Producer for this is: Morgan Price (via Patreon) Don't forget to subscribe to this channel for more great science videos! Our GEAR ------------ Main DSLR: https://amzn.to/2Sho2qc Second Camera: http://amzn.to/2B9HInR Main Lens: http://amzn.to/2BaEXTk The Adventure Camera Bag: http://amzn.to/2B8WYRH The Macro Lens: http://amzn.to/2hHUhxW Telephoto Lens: http://amzn.to/2za1FJV Our Mega Wide Lens: http://amzn.to/2z9KtnS Our BEST On-camera Mic: http://amzn.to/2hGuSVt The Drone: http://amzn.to/2z84Bqc My Moving Timelapse Setup: https://amzn.to/2SeCZcJ GoPro HERO 7: https://amzn.to/2ShoPHG Our Filmmaking Book: http://amzn.to/2zV88LS Our Music: https://goo.gl/roSjb7 The full video setup: https://kit.com/UntamedScience (By buying through these links you help us support the channel) On Social -------------- Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/untamedscience/ (Jonas @behindthescience) Twitter: https://twitter.com/untamedscience Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/untamedscience Website: http://www.untamedscience.com YouTube: http://bit.ly/2EDk6vO (for most of my work) Here are more links to our work: If you're new to filmmaking, explore our series on Basic Photo and Video Techniques: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-EG-A7IRIc Our behind-the-scenes YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/robnelsonfilms Help us create amazing, world-reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel: https://goo.gl/ZHnFcL
Views: 432 Untamed Science
Shaggy Parasols - Part 2 of 4
 
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Making a spore print in order to positively identify an edible Shaggy Parasol mushroom. NOTE: I made an unintentional error while I was speaking about the three species of edible Shaggy Mushrooms. The second one I called "Chlorophyllum lepiota," but I intended to say "Chlorophyllum olivieri." "Lepiota" is the genus name by which these mushrooms used to be identified, but that has more recently been changed by mycologists to "Chlorophyllum." Same mushroom. I also mistakenly said I would leave the mushrooms in my dehydrator for a year or two. Not so. They actually only take about 12 hours or less to dehydrate. What I meant was that I would store them in a dehydrated state for at least a year or two, before rehydrating. For more information on Shaggy Parasols, visit http://www.MushroomObsession.com/.
Views: 257 Larry Short
Top 5 Most Poisonous Mushrooms in The World
 
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Top 5 Most Poisonous Mushrooms in The World 5. Webcaps (Cortinarius species) The two species of webcap, the deadly webcap (Cortinarius rubellus) and the fool’s webcap (Cortinarius orellanus), are very similar in appearance to both each other and to a number of edible varieties. These mushrooms feature a poison known as orellanin, which initially causes symptoms similar to the common flu. Orellanin has an insidiously long latency period and may take 2 days to 3 weeks to cause symptoms, often leading to a misdiagnosis. The toxin ultimately causes kidney failure and death if left untreated. In 2008, English author Nicholas Evans mistakenly collected and served webcap mushrooms to his relatives, resulting in hospitalization for four of them. He, his wife, and his brother-in-law all required kidney transplants as a result of the poisoning. 4. Autumn Skullcap (Galerina marginata) Common throughout the Northern Hemisphere and parts of Australia, Galerina marginata is a gilled, wood-rotting mushroom with the same amatoxins as the death cap mushroom. Ingestion causes diarrhea, vomiting, hypothermia, and liver damage, and can result in death if left untreated. While it is not especially similar to edible species, several deaths and poisonings have been attributed to collectors mistaking the autumn skullcap for hallucinogenic Psilocybe mushrooms. 3. Destroying Angels (Amanita species) The destroying angels are actually several species of all-white mushrooms in the genus Amanita. These incredibly toxic fungi are very similar in appearance to edible button mushrooms and the meadow mushrooms, and have been collected by mistake on numerous occassions. One of these species, Amanita bisporigera, is considered to be the most toxic North American mushroom. Symptoms take 5 to 24 hours to appear and include vomiting, delirium, convulsions, diarrhea, liver and kidney failure, and often lead to death. 2. Podostroma cornu-damae This rare fungus is native to Asia and has been responsible for a number of fatalities in Japan and Korea. Its red fruiting bodies contain potent toxins known as trichothecene mycotoxins and can cause multiple organ failure in those unlucky enough to consume them. Symptoms of poisoning include stomach pain, peeling skin, hair loss, low blood pressure, liver necrosis, acute kidney failure, and result in death if left untreated. 1. Deadly Dapperling (Lepiota brunneoincarnata) The deadly dapperling is a gilled mushroom known to contain amatoxins. Widely distributed throughout Europe and parts of Asia, the mushroom is fairly innocuous and has been mistaken for edible varieties, though poisonings are not very common. Accidental consumption leads to severe liver toxicity and can have lethal consequences if immediate treatment is not received. Music Island by MBB https://soundcloud.com/mbbofficial Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/6by8zhaG04Y
Views: 1073 Dope Facts
7 poisonous mushrooms in the world
 
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video is all about poisonous mushrooms, which might help you learn about some of the most poisonous mushrooms. In this video I have featured the following mushrooms 1. Death cap / amanita phalloides 2. conocybe filaris 3.cortinarious species 4. Autumn scullcap/ Galerina marginata 5. Destroying angel/ amanita verosa 6. Podostromo cornu damae 7. Deadly dapperling I hope you will enjoy this video, please subscribe to my channel
Views: 40 Mushroom Theory
October Edible Mushrooms Pennsylvania (Looking For The Flavor)
 
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Foraging Maitake, Blewit, and Shrimp of the Woods
Views: 1557 Apex Grower
Attractive wild mushrooms in Singapore - July 5, 2018
 
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Jul 5, 2018 Pretty wild mushrooms of around 3 species were recently seen and videoed for sharing. One is a lingzhi.
Views: 61 Kong Yuen Sing
4k Leucoagaricus rubrotinctus Mushroom or Red Tinged Lepiota So Beautiful
 
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Found a beautiful Leucoagaricus rubrotinctus or Red Tinged Lepiota mushroom on my last mushroom hunt. Found tons of neat and new types, stay tuned as I will be adding videos over the week of my finds! This lepiota is small, reddish orange cap with a distinct red dimple in the convex area. The stalk is white with either brown or gray fibers and has a partial veil remaining, as seen. A small common summer mushroom that likes rainy conditions and moist rich soil.
Views: 17 Walt Reven Jr
List of Deadly Mushrooms in The World
 
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List of Deadly Mushrooms in The World 1. Death Cap (Amanita phalloides) Perhaps the deadliest of all mushrooms, the death cap is found throughout Europe and closely resembles edible straw mushrooms and caesar’s mushrooms. Its heat-stable amatoxins withstand cooking temperatures and quickly damage cells throughout the body. Within 6 to 12 hours after consumption, violent abdominal pain, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea appear, causing rapid loss of fluid from the tissues and intense thirst. 2. Conocybe filaris blickwinkel/AlamyConocybe filaris is an innocent-looking lawn mushroom that is especially common in the Pacific Northwest. Featuring the same mycotoxins as the death cap mushroom, C. filaris is potentially fatal if eaten. The onset of gastrointestinal symptoms often occurs 6-24 hours after the mushrooms were consumed, frequently leading to an initial misdiagnosis of food poisoning or the stomach flu. The patient may appear to recover, only to suffer from a life-threatening reappearance of the gastrointestinal distress, coupled with liver and kidney failure. 3. Webcaps (Cortinarius species) The two species of webcap, the deadly webcap (Cortinarius rubellus) and the fool’s webcap (Cortinarius orellanus), are very similar in appearance to both each other and to a number of edible varieties. These mushrooms feature a poison known as orellanin, which initially causes symptoms similar to the common flu. Orellanin has an insidiously long latency period and may take 2 days to 3 weeks to cause symptoms, often leading to a misdiagnosis. The toxin ultimately causes kidney failure and death if left untreated. In 2008, English author Nicholas Evans mistakenly collected and served webcap mushrooms to his relatives, resulting in hospitalization for four of them. He, his wife, and his brother-in-law all required kidney transplants as a result of the poisoning. 4. Autumn Skullcap (Galerina marginata) Common throughout the Northern Hemisphere and parts of Australia, Galerina marginata is a gilled, wood-rotting mushroom with the same amatoxins as the death cap mushroom. Ingestion causes diarrhea, vomiting, hypothermia, and liver damage, and can result in death if left untreated. While it is not especially similar to edible species, several deaths and poisonings have been attributed to collectors mistaking the autumn skullcap for hallucinogenic Psilocybe mushrooms. 5. Destroying Angels (Amanita species) The destroying angels are actually several species of all-white mushrooms in the genus Amanita. These incredibly toxic fungi are very similar in appearance to edible button mushrooms and the meadow mushrooms, and have been collected by mistake on numerous occassions. One of these species, Amanita bisporigera, is considered to be the most toxic North American mushroom. Symptoms take 5 to 24 hours to appear and include vomiting, delirium, convulsions, diarrhea, liver and kidney failure, and often lead to death. 6. Podostroma cornu-damae Image Republic Inc./AlamyThis rare fungus is native to Asia and has been responsible for a number of fatalities in Japan and Korea. Its red fruiting bodies contain potent toxins known as trichothecene mycotoxins and can cause multiple organ failure in those unlucky enough to consume them. Symptoms of poisoning include stomach pain, peeling skin, hair loss, low blood pressure, liver necrosis, acute kidney failure, and result in death if left untreated. 7. Deadly Dapperling (Lepiota brunneoincarnata) Poppy/AlamyThe deadly dapperling is a gilled mushroom known to contain amatoxins. Widely distributed throughout Europe and parts of Asia, the mushroom is fairly innocuous and has been mistaken for edible varieties, though poisonings are not very common. Accidental consumption leads to severe liver toxicity and can have lethal consequences if immediate treatment is not received. Facebook Twitter Google+ Please Like And Subscribe Sky News https://youtu.be/KASV4cM0P8I
Views: 875 Sky News
10 Creepy Plants And Fungi That Look Like Human Body Parts
 
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10 Creepy Plants And Fungi That Look Like Human Body Parts, despite what many might think, 10 Creepy Plants And Fungi That Look Like Human Body Parts is well known across hundreds of nations all over the world. 10 Creepy Plants And Fungi That Look Like Human Body Parts has been around for several centuries and has a very important meaning in the lives of many. It would be safe to assume that 10 Creepy Plants And Fungi That Look Like Human Body Parts is going to be around for a long time and have an enormous impact on the lives of many people. #10 Bleeding Tooth Fungus The hood of Hydnellum pecki comes in various shapes, and when it oozes a red, sticky substance, it could easily be mistaken for a bloody tooth dropped on the ground. #9 Doll’s Eye We’ve already documented how deadly Actaea pachypoda is, but its white oblong berries are the truly bizarre part of the plant. The berries sit at the end of red stalks similar to the eyes of Spongebob Squarepants’s boss, Mr. Krabs. The sinister-looking berries are a warning. #8 Girdled Dapperling Several different mushrooms have caps that look strikingly like human nipples. Many of these belong to the Lepiota genus. Lepiota boudieri‘s flesh-white cap gradually darkens from ochre to dark brown in the center. The surface appears almost smooth like skin. Covering the surface are thin, brown hairs. #7 Hooker’s Lips Psychotria elata is a tree found in the tropical rain forests of Central and South America (Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia, and Ecuador). From December through March, bright red bracts—specialized leaves—look like puckered lips smeared with lipstick. The ruby color entices pollinators like hummingbirds and butterflies. As the bracts open, they reveal small, star-shaped blooms and oval berries. #6 False Morels For many American mushroom hunters, the morel (Morchella) is the beluga caviar of the fungus world. It’s so popular that morels are sold for a least $20 per pound while in season. The drawback is that inexperienced hunters do not know the difference between real and false morels, and the latter are highly toxic. About 20 percent of mushroom-related deaths occur after the person ingests a false morel. There are several species of false morels, and some are less toxic than others. Less toxic varieties are considered delicacies in Nordic countries, where people boil and rinse the morels several times. #5 Wrinkled Peach Mushroom The cap of the wrinkled peach takes on various shapes and colors depending on to the quality and quantity of light it receives in its juvenile stages. Also known as the netted rhodotus and the rosy veincap, the wrinkled peach can look strikingly like a human heart, a stomach, or even a spongy lung. The surface of the cap is gelatinous and has white ridges or veins with reticulated deep grooves, looking like an internal organ’s vascular system. Beneath the surface, the flesh is firm. #4 Snapdragon Seed Pod Antirrhinum majus is an annual flower with dragon-like jaws that snap when the sides are squeezed. It’s believed that the snapdragon was originally a wildflower in Spain and Italy, and it has several legends associated with it. One of them is that if a person conceals the flower on their person or in a room, they will appear fascinating to other people. Another legend has it that any house with snapdragons growing in its flower bed will be free of curses and witchcraft. #3 Wood Ear Also called the tree ear or the jelly ear, Auricularia auricula has jelly-like flesh and a cupped, reddish-brown, ear-shaped body. It sports tiny, very fine hairs, and the surface is irregularly veined. They usually grow in groups on rotting or living trees. It has a similar shape to the cup fungus, but the Auricularia auricula is rubbery, not brittle. #2 Purple Jellydisc Fungus When the jelly-like Ascocoryne sarcoides first grows on a dead deciduous log, it appears as spherical lobes. Later, it flattens into a saucer shape. #1 Devil’s Fingers Mushroom Clathrus archeri, better known as devil’s fingers or octopus stinkhorn, is a truly creepy mushroom. In its mature form, it has four to eight fingers as red as a fire engine with black spheres that resemble suction cups on an octopus’s tentacles.
Views: 1780245 WikiTube
Top 7 Most Poisonous Fungus Species
 
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Top 7 Most Poisonous Fungus Species 1. Death Cap (Amanita phalloides) 2. Conocybe filaris 3. Webcaps (Cortinarius species) 4. Autumn Skullcap (Galerina marginata) 5. Destroying Angels (Amanita species) 6. Podostroma cornu-damae 7. Deadly Dapperling (Lepiota brunneoincarnata) G+ | https://plus.google.com/103471749409788130040 Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/Top-Pick-136365467028855 Please Like & Subscribe Top Pick https://youtu.be/r-u1Gv-QeoE
Views: 261 Top Pick
Wild Mushrooms of Europe: Agrocybe rivulosa
 
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Audio - "Vision" by Ian Taylor: 2007
Views: 46 Jarl Kilduff
Mushroom Hunting UK 2017 Parasol Mushrooms
 
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Hunting mushrooms and to my surprise I find two parasol mushrooms whilst mushroom picking near a grass verge down a country lane.
Views: 127 Sample Text
Wild mushrooms and poisonous millipedes seen in Singapore
 
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Sunday 15 July 2018. Singapore is highly urbanised. So, it is difficult to see a variety of wild mushrooms in one small place. At least 4 species of wild mushrooms in a small garden in Singapore. A lingzhi mushroom from a fallen branch was seen by me. There are many yellow-spotted millipedes seen in the plantar box. They are poisonous as they produce cyanide.
Views: 248 Kong Yuen Sing
Foraging Parasol mushroom
 
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Wild Man Steve Brill Talking about Parasol Mushrooms
Views: 2258 the3foragers
Top 10 MOST DEADLY Mushrooms!
 
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Welcome to Top10Archive! Foraging for food was our ancestors way of survival and although throughout the years we've learned what and what not to eat, there are still those times where misclassification or contamination occurs - and sometimes, the results can be deadly. From Angel Wings to Death Caps, we're counting down the top 10 deadliest mushrooms... Support us by shopping on Amazon! ://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn Check out our website: ://.top10archive.net Follow Us on Twitter: s://twitter.com/top10archives Follow Us on : s://..com/top10archives 10. Gyromitra esculenta (False Morel) 9. Podostroma Cornu-damae 8. Pholiotina Rugosa (Conocybe Filaris) 7. Pleurocybella porrigens (Angel Wings) 6. Galerina marginata (Autumn Skullcap) 5. Lepiota brunneoincarnata (Deadly Dapperling) 4. Cortinarius Rubellus (Deadly Webcap) 3. Amanita Verna (Fool's Mushroom) 2. Amanita Virosa (Destroying Angel) 1. Amanita phalloides (Death Cap) References: ://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fun... ://.mushroomexpert.com/gyromit... ://.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Gy... ://.fungimag.com/winter-2012-a... ://.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic... s://.researchgate.net/publicat... ://.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Ph... ://.mycobank.org/name/Pholioti... ://.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Ph... ://.namyco.org/pleurocybella_t... ://.rogersmushrooms.com/galler... s://.shroomery.org/forums/show... ://.messiah.edu/oakes/fungi_on... ://.mushroomexpert.com/galerin... ://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fun... ://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/fie... ://.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20... s://.researchgate.net/publicat... ://.mycobank.org/Biolomics.asp... ://.first-nature.com/fungi/cor... ://.rogersmushrooms.com/galler... ://.mykoweb.com/TFWNA/P-32.html ://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content... ://naturespoisons.com/2014/04/08/... ://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fun... s://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/200... ://.mushroomexpert.com/amanita... s://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/al... ://.rogersmushrooms.com/galler... ://.first-nature.com/fungi/ama... ://botit.b
Views: 73 Satan FC
Honey Mushroom Hunting, Identification, and Look Alike
 
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How to cook honey mushrooms: https://youtu.be/AfG2BrEwc7s ------------------------------------ Early fall is the best season for honey mushroom (armillaria mellea) hunting. I stumbled upon these beautiful yellow-cap mushrooms under a dead tree in Maryland 2017. Check out this video to see how I identify and harvest honey mushroom, and differentiate it with one of its look alikes. --------------------------------------------- Video Playlists: Wild Mushroom Identification: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV1JHniMPS4&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBSTIdrSEcqUxNWpLZHRM6BY Wild Mushroom Hunting & Tips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqYbywkfcV0&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBQcrIVvV1Y5SZPe4cYSWSbJ Wild Mushroom You Can Eat Series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdreTXKG9P8&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBSNMWt9uGK2k3kTfydsAw3v Wild Mushroom Recipes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfG2BrEwc7s&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBReRhHttlKYLbZeDS0a-IL0 Wild Fruits and Plants: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzYHncmE7ZY&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBSFlfUxXy1Q22zUoFA2Vdts All about Chanterelles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZqLBi6mHrQ&list=PLSAF2IFc7dBQPnKwOx75xhrdNuTekk66J ------------------------- About this channel: I am a wild mushroom lover and this channel is about me and my wife identifying, collecting, cooking and sometimes preserving wild mushrooms. I've tasted nearly fifty different species of wild mushrooms in Northeast America so far, and I would like to extend my list and to share with you my adventures of nature exploring. If you like my videos, please SUBSCRIBE and share with friends to make the channel grow! ---------------------------- Be cautious & always refer to multiple reliable sources before consuming any wild edibles!
Views: 10789 Old Man of the Woods
Mushrooms in My Garden - CAN I EAT THEM?
 
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Mushrooms in My Garden - CAN I EAT THEM? https://youtu.be/9N4b62f0znU Join My Facebook GARDENING GROUP Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArizonaGarden/ Find Me on Snapchat & Instagram: "JakeMaceTaiChi" Join My New Online Gardening School for $5 at http://subscriptions.viddler.com/JakeMaceKungFu (Scroll to the Bottom) Check out My NEW Gardening STORE Here: http://jakemace.com/kungfu/Gardening_STORE.html JOIN My NEW Facebook GARDENING PAGE! Click HERE: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArizonaGarden/ Let's Garden Together Online. My New Gardening Online School is $5 a month or $50 a year at http://www.JakeMace.com Check Out & ORDER Our Gardening Supplies & Tree Food HERE: http://jakemace.com/kungfu/Gardening.html Hit the "Like" button, Click "SUBSCRIBE", Comment Below, and Share this Video! Friend me on Facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/jakemace.taichi Check out my website at http://www.JakeMace.com Email me at: [email protected] Check out my other YouTube channels at: http://www.YouTube.com/ShaolinCenter http://www.YouTube.com/OrderTaiChi http://www.YouTube.com/VeganAthlete
Views: 27417 VeganAthlete
Amanita ocreata "Destroying Angel" Mushroom Identification (California)
 
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Here we walk through identifying the deadly Amanita ocreata, aka the "Destroying Angel". This is a common spring time mushroom in California's hardwood habitat, especially along the coast.
Views: 19076 Mushroom Resource
Shaggy Parasol Mushroom
 
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This is just another video to help you identify the Shaggy Parasol Mushroom. These were picked in Colorado Springs Colorado USA.
Gyromitra Korfii ( The Bullnose Mushroom )
 
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A quick description of Gyromitra Korfii. One of two edible species of Gyromitra.The other being a western species, Gyromitra Gigas.
How to Identify Wild Mushrooms in Pennsylvania
 
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Best offers for your Gardening & Lawn Care ideas https://amzn.to/2InnD0w --------------- How to Identify Wild Mushrooms in Pennsylvania. Foraging for wild mushrooms has been a pastime for decades, but is gaining in popularity as Americans develop their palates. Not only do wild mushrooms lend a unique, delicate flavor and meaty texture to a dish, they represent a challenge for food lovers. Veteran gatherers of wild mushrooms meet to... Table of contents How to Identify Wild Mushrooms in Pennsylvania Things You'll Need 00:58 What Not To Eat 01:11 Common Wild Mushrooms 02:20 Tips & Warnings 03:53 ----------------- If you would like to know how to help deaf people realize their potential in the world visit Global - https://wfdeaf.org/ United States - https://nad.org/ United Kingdom - https://bda.org.uk/ Australia - https://deafaustralia.org.au/
Views: 520 Brainy.Garden
Wild edible shaggy parasol the mushroom that taste like steak!
 
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Shaggy parasol wild edible mushroom. How to id and be 100 percent certain.
Views: 6351 hibbys homestead
Eatable Pennsylvania wild mushrooms
 
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Eatable Pennsylvania wild mushrooms Aborted Entoloma and Gilled Entoloma (Abortivum)
Views: 6773 RedFree100
Mushroom, Death Angel (Destroying Angel) in urdu
 
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Mushroom, Death Angel (Destroying Angel) in urdu----------------------------------------------------- ✿Subscribe Youtube https://youtu.be/O_UEbqWQTsA https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh09kumsLLvtkNWTM6Lbfkg ✿Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/megahealthtips/?skip_nax_wizard=true ✿Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/109864109706730146158 ----------------------------------------------------- Mega Health Tips,destroying angel mushroom habitat destroying angel representative species amanita bisporigera lepiota (false parasol) destroying angel bible destroying angel scientific name amanita verna
Views: 472 Mega Health Tips
The parasol mushroom Macrolepiota procera or Lepiota procera
 
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It is a basidiomycete fungus with a large, prominent fruiting body resembling a parasol. It is a fairly common species on well-drained soils. It is found solitary or in groups and fairy rings in pastures and occasionally in woodland. Globally, it is widespread in temperate regions. Greece 12.11.2017
Micro-World of 'Wild Mushrooms' found on a Woodland walk
 
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Mushroom: A mushroom (or toadstool) is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface. "Mushroom" describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word. Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as "bolete", "puffball", "stinkhorn", and "morel", and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called "agarics" in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their place Agaricales. By extension, the term "mushroom" can also designate the entire fungus when in culture; the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms; or the species itself).....https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom United States: The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America (/əˈmɛrɪkə/), is a federal republic[16][17] composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.[fn 6] Forty-eight states and the federal district are contiguous and located in North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States
Family sickened after eating poisonous mushrooms
 
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Four members of a Newington family became sick after eating poisonous mushrooms picked from their backyard.
Views: 985 WTNH News8
Pennsylvania Autumn Wild Mushroom Hunt, Harvest and Preparation
 
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hunting wild mushrooms and enjoying the great Pennsylvania fall colors. i hope you enjoy it to. please thumbs up if you like it
Views: 1286 A Guy Named Alfons
Rare Mushroom
 
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One more Rain forest mushroom.species name unknown.and a couple of ferns.
Views: 775 vidaripollen
7 of The World’s Most Poisonous Mushrooms
 
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Thanks for watching.... Deadly Dapperling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepiota_brunneoincarnata Podostroma cornu-damae https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podostroma_cornu-damae Destroying Angel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destroying_angel Autumn Skullcap https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galerina_marginata Webcaps https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortinarius Conocybe filaris https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pholiotina_rugosa Death Cap https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_phalloides Source: http://www.britannica.com/list/7-of-the-worlds-most-poisonous-mushrooms Music: Tick Tock,Jimmy Fontanez; Media Right Productions; YouTube Audio Library A mushroom (or toadstool) is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface. "Mushroom" describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word. Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as "bolete", "puffball", "stinkhorn", and "morel", and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called "agarics" in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their place Agaricales. By extension, the term "mushroom" can also designate the entire fungus when in culture; the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms; or the species itself. Identifying mushrooms requires a basic understanding of their macroscopic structure. Most are Basidiomycetes and gilled. Their spores, called basidiospores, are produced on the gills and fall in a fine rain of powder from under the caps as a result. At the microscopic level the basidiospores are shot off basidia and then fall between the gills in the dead air space. As a result, for most mushrooms, if the cap is cut off and placed gill-side-down overnight, a powdery impression reflecting the shape of the gills (or pores, or spines, etc.) is formed (when the fruit body is sporulating). The color of the powdery print, called a spore print, is used to help classify mushrooms and can help to identify them. Spore print colors include white (most common), brown, black, purple-brown, pink, yellow, and creamy, but almost never blue, green, or red. While modern identification of mushrooms is quickly becoming molecular, the standard methods for identification are still used by most and have developed into a fine art harking back to medieval times and the Victorian era, combined with microscopic examination. The presence of juices upon breaking, bruising reactions, odors, tastes, shades of color, habitat, habit, and season are all considered by both amateur and professional mycologists. Tasting and smelling mushrooms carries its own hazards because of poisons and allergens. Chemical tests are also used for some genera. In general, identification to genus can often be accomplished in the field using a local mushroom guide. Identification to species, however, requires more effort; one must remember that a mushroom develops from a button stage into a mature structure, and only the latter can provide certain characteristics needed for the identification of the species. However, over-mature specimens lose features and cease producing spores. Many novices have mistaken humid water marks on paper for white spore prints, or discolored paper from oozing liquids on lamella edges for colored spored prints. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom
Views: 1633 VeniVidiVici!
Mushroom time lapse - Life in 60 seconds
 
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Life cycle of a mushroom in 60 seconds. This pair of Yellow Pleated Parasol mushrooms grew next to a potted plant indoors. Binomial name: Leucocoprinus birnbaumii Other common names: yellow houseplant mushroom plantpot dapperling Flower pot parasol Yellow pleated parasol Lemon yellow Lepiota Plantpot dapperling Yellow spirit umbrella Goudgele plooiparasol Keltaukonsieni Gelber Faltenschirmling This fungus is not edible. It can cause stomach trouble and may be poisonous. http://www.jekfoto.nl
Views: 52588 jek01
Leucoagaricus Leucothite Mushrooms
 
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Saw these all over town the past 2 days
Views: 211 green dream
Macrolepiota Procera or Chlorophyllum Molybdites
 
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This type of mushromm with aspect of parasol mushroom could easily mislead you. I would always doubt if it is the edible or the poisonous one. There are so much varieties of this sort of fungus and some are toxic mushroom species such as, for example, the Clitocybe Rivulosa, commonly known as the false champignon. I am showing you these mushrooms that spontaneously grow up in a pot where I was trying to cultivate another plant.
Views: 784 Hernán Conejeros
Mushroom Poisoning Podcast
 
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Here is Full Circle Animal Health Care's latest Podcast video of Dr. Yeager discussing mushroom toxicity and how pets can be affected. She also explains the different types of mushrooms to look out for if you and your pet like to explore outside during the fall season.
Unusual Red Bruising  Mushroom
 
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weird bleeding Mushroom - found in my tasmanian garden. It is edible and tasty. Sounds like species found in north america in my David Aurora field guide - we don't have any described like this down under native or introduced except perhaps a. sylvaticus? it's got rich dark chocolate coloured spores and with lots of water eventually grows on a less stumpy more slender, tougher stem than the commoner edible agarics an elegant silky grey-brown stem rather like a lepiota. With a lot of rain the single ring all but washes away, as do the brown scales of the cap which is very chunky when young - broadening and flattening out into a thinner parasol with a bit of central bump. I wonder if it's a cross breed? is that possible? We have edible parasol muchrooms in the garden.
Views: 607 seachangeau
Death cap mushrooms in British Columbia - Paul Kroeger
 
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Paul Kroeger is a Mycologist, President, Pacific Northwest Key Council, Vancouver, BC, & Vancouver Mycological Society Member Presented by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, the UBC Department of Botany, and the Beaty Biodiversity Museum.
Views: 519 beatymuseum
Bad Brownish Mushrooms, the yellow stain gives them away...
 
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Don't eat these mushrooms, which stain yellow when you scratch them, even though they look like the edible field sort in their other colors!
Views: 83 barbie pauly
Disappearing Mushrooms
 
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On a walk around the yard... I noticed that there were a lot of mushrooms knocked over and scattered... it seemed like something unusual... so I went out looking for mushrooms and to see if I could see what was causing the damage. I was amazed to find how many different types of mushrooms there were... and they all seem to have their own spots that they like... although there were a few that seemed to get along ok... it seemed more like a map with villages scattered here and there. Small and distinct areas in which they thrived. I had not been aware that squirrels ate mushrooms, but then again... why not... they are much like a nut anyway aren't they? In any case... Thanks for watching Larry
Views: 673 Larry McCafferty
MUSHROOMS AFTER THE RAIN!
 
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So many mushrooms popped up from under the ground after this last rain! So many different kinds. Some are edible and some are not! I am studying them and I have a friend that knows the local mushrooms, which ones are good. Did you see the pictures of all of them on my Facebook? So many colors and kinds! There are wild strawberries and edible dandelions too, as you can see! Haha
Views: 278 Liberty Carter
After Rain Mushrooms
 
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Parque Rivera, Montevideo, Uruguay
Views: 310 Mahsa Photography
Tropical Hygrophorus mushroom habitat
 
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Habitat of Hygrophorus mushroom species in Goa University campus
Views: 302 Nandkumar Kamat
Aussie Mushrooms & Fungus
 
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Like the title reads - lots of mushrooms and fungus, all found in the rainforests of southeastern Queensland in May 2012. Unfortunately, I don't know the individual species, but some of these are certainly quite pretty and colourful. Incredible variety too. That's the rainforest for ya'
Views: 190 aussiefied
Stropharia rugosoannulata -Garden Giant- Australia
 
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Growing on woodchip in a park, Dorrigo NSW, Australia. Easily cultivated. Autumn.
Views: 395 JsunLau
Conocybe Apala
 
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Views: 292 Cody Morgan
Sarah Myers Discusses Wild Mushrooms in Bhutan
 
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The School for Field Studies (SFS) Bhutan: Himalayan Forests, Watersheds, and Rural Livelihoods program (http://www.fieldstudies.org/bhutan) introduces students to Bhutanese culture, society, and environment. Traveling and trekking across valleys and ridges and through villages, students will gain an intimate knowledge of the diverse ecosystems and rural livelihood strategies, and conduct research on Bhutan's priority environmental concerns and resource management and biodiversity conservation strategies.