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The California Gold Rush cartoon 1849 (The Wild West)
 
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Not many Americans lived in California, but that soon changed. By 1849 thousands upon thousands of people arrived in search of gold. Support the cartoons on patreon: https://www.patreon.com/simplehistory?ty=c Get your copy of Simple History: The Wild West today! https://www.amazon.com/Simple-History-Wild-Daniel-Turner/dp/153916036X/ Simple history gives you the facts, simple! See the book collection here: Amazon USA http://www.amazon.com/Daniel-Turner/e/B00H5TYLAE/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1457289367&sr=8-1 Amazon UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/Daniel-Turner/e/B00H5TYLAE/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1457289367&sr=8-1 http://www.simplehistory.co.uk/ https://www.facebook.com/Simple-History-549437675141192/ https://twitter.com/simple_guides Credit: Narrator: Chris Kane http://ckvox.com/ Animation: Daniel Turner CJ Boucher artwork: Daniel Turner Music: One Fine Day
Views: 665514 Simple History
Chinese Camp Ghost Town!!  Remnant Of Notable California Gold Rush Mining Town
 
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Chinese Camp is a census-designated place (CDP) in Tuolumne County, California, United States. The population was 126 at the 2010 census, down from 146 at the 2000 census. It lies in the grassy foothills of the Sierra Nevada near the southern end of California's Gold Country. Royalty Free Music by http://audiomicro.com/royalty-free-music I will not attempt to contact with the artists who created the audio file(s) Link To Bodie California Ghost Town Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v_BkxQuy1o
Views: 27747 MoneyBags73
The Ghost Town At Vulture Mine
 
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Take a deeper dive and access the research notes here: https://www.buzzfeed.com/watch/video/33390?placement=YTD We search for the buried spirits of a lawless frontier town Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedBlue! https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedblue1 https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedviolet GET MORE BUZZFEED: https://www.buzzfeed.com https://www.buzzfeed.com/videos https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedvideo https://www.youtube.com/boldly https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedblue https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedviolet https://www.youtube.com/perolike https://www.youtube.com/ladylike BuzzFeedBlue Sports, video games, Unsolved & more epic daily videos! Credits: https://www.buzzfeed.com/bfmp/videos/33489 MUSIC Licensed via Audio Network SFX Provided By AudioBlocks (https://www.audioblocks.com) Be Afraid Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. End of the World Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Doomsday Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. All Around Me Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. B Train Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. That Hurts Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. They Come Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Seasick Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. In Your Face Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Down the Hole Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Not Feeling Well Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. STILLS Ghost Town Alec Cohen/Getty Images Inside abandoned gold mine tunnel or shaft in the Nevada desert. NeilLockhart/Getty Images falling rock slide TobinC/Getty Images Dangerous Mine Entrance mrdoomits/Getty Images Dirty Adult Male Gold Miner Staring at the Camera ysbrandcosijn/Getty Images Hanging tree AdrianHillman/Getty Images mars SSSCCC/Getty Images United Kingdom, England, London, View of Big Ben and Westminster Bridge reds/Getty Images Mould growth, close up detail Jonathan Knowles/Getty Images Temporary Base Camp in Peralta Canyon Historical / Contributor/Getty Images Portrait of Robert O'Hara Burke... De Agostini Picture Library / Contributor/Getty Images Old schoolhouse ruin GeoStock/Getty Images Henry Wickenburg bust by Clyde Ross Morgan at Tegner Street. Witold Skrypczak/Getty Images Native Gold on Quartz, Nevada John Cancalosi/Getty Images Gold Mining Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Superfortress Factory FPG / Staff/Getty Images Miners During The California Gold Rush Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Interior Of Tunnel In California Gold Mine Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Directly Above View Of Tunnel At Abandoned Gold Mine Kawazu Fumi Minoru / EyeEm/Getty Images Gold Bar Against White Background Martin Konopka / EyeEm/Getty Images Desert landscape vlynder/Getty Images Prospectors KenWiedemann/Getty Images Tall Cactus marks the entry to Goldmine Dusty Pixel photography/Getty Images VIDEO Old Film Look V2 GokhanApaydin/Getty Images
Views: 6768892 BuzzFeed Multiplayer
Historic Hwy 49, California's Gold Country
 
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California's picturesque foothills fed by the clear crystal snow runoff from the Sierra, home to the many diverse Native American cultures was forever changed when James Marshall discovered Gold in California at Sutter's Mill in 1848 and set off the largest gold rush in history. Reminders of this abundantly rich history can be found everywhere along Hwy 49 as it winds and meanders through the Mother Lode mining towns of days gone by, through flowering white dogwoods, olive colored oaks and towering cedar, the remnants of history; old stone cabins and buildings, mining equipment, and stamp mills that were used to crush gold-bearing quartz. This historic area needs to be preserved and shared to save the heritage and rugged beauty of Hwy 49 and Gold Country, one of California's most precious resources, for everyone, everywhere. Today along this incredible American byway is a region of quaint bed and breakfasts, shops lining historic main streets, award winning wineries, fine restaurants, antique and gift shops, art galleries, golf courses, unlimited recreation and the chance to travel back in time... A 9.5 minute video covering Gold Rush history in the first half and Gold Country today in the second half. www.historichwy49.com #Sutter #Marshall #highway49 #americanriver #gold #panning #Coloma #Nisenan #Cullomain #suttersmill #Sonora #Mariposa #Oakhurst #Angelscamp #MarkTwain #Nevadacity #Grassvalley #Suttercreek #Downieville #rush #49er #mine #miner #mining #history #Califonia #motherlode #suttersfort #nativeamerican #historichwy49.com
Views: 47528 G. Thomas Edwards
Metal Detecting California Gold Rush Mining Camps!!! Garrett AT Max
 
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In this episode I head out to metal detect some amazing old California gold rush mining camps and am in for a huge surprise on what I find next to the creek! We are located in the gold country of California and we metal detect old mines and old mining towns and buildings. In our videos you will see us metal detecting and digging up old silver and gold coin, relics from the gold rush and civil war. If you enjoy watching metal Detecting videos then you are in the right place. We give our viewers and exciting experience that will leave them wanting to jump in the car and head out to go metal detecting. So get comfortable and get ready to see some amazing metal detecting finds. If you are thinking about upgrading to the Garrett AT Max, Garrett AT Pro or the Garrett AT Pro Pointer I highly recommend clicking on the links I put next to the equipment we use. Not only will it give you the best deal on the items but it will help us out a ton to keep us going on making these videos as they are affiliate links. Thank you for your support on keeping the dream alive! Equipment we use: Garrett AT Max http://amzn.to/2sdDv1Y Garrett AT Pro http://amzn.to/2BbPYGo Garrett AT Pin pointer http://amzn.to/2E65PsQiiij GoPro 6 http://amzn.to/2BYhpUe
Boom Towns of the California Gold Rush
 
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My 10 year old son did a gold rush project for his 4th grade class. This is a video he did featuring Boom Towns.
Views: 21311 geoffschulz
America the Story of Us: Gold Rush | History
 
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Discover how the Gold Rush led to the creation of California. Own America: The Story of Us on DVD or Blu-ray! http://www.shophistorystore.com/ HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 225545 HISTORY
The Gold Rush | California History [ep.5]
 
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This is part 5 of a series on California history, specifically cover the Gold Rush of 1848-1860. Click here to see start the series from the beginning: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjnwpaclU4wUD7y8912ViyAtGfraKi9ru ------------------------------------------------------------ references: Bancroft, Hubert Howe. The Works of Hubert Howe Bancroft. 39 Vols. San Francisco, Calif.: The History Company, 1890. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubert_Howe_Bancroft#Published_works Boessenecker, John. Badge and Buckshot: Lawlessness in Old California. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1988. https://amzn.to/2NGretz Boessenecker, John. “California Bandidos.” Southern California Quarterly 80, i4 (Dec. 1, 1998) 419-434. Boessenecker, John. Gold Dust & Gunsmoke: Tales of Gold Rush Outlaws, Gunfighters, Lawmen, and Vigilantes. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1999. https://amzn.to/2JdmTL1 Burns, John and Richard Orsi, editors. Taming the Elephant: Politics, Government, and Law in Pioneer California. San Francisco: California Historical Society, 2003. https://amzn.to/2NEaT8G Hall-Patton, Joseph. Pacifying Paradise: Violence and Vigilantism in San Luis Obispo. San Luis Obispo: California Polytechnic - San Luis Obispo thesis, 2016. http://www.digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/1594/ Igler, David. Industrial Cowboys: Miller & Lux and the Transformation of the Far West, 1850-1920. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. https://amzn.to/2NFK7g8 Johnson, Susan Lee. Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush. New York: W.W. Norton, 2000. https://amzn.to/2NEFcMC Wilson, Lori. The Joaquin Band: The History behind the Legend. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 2011. https://amzn.to/2NC1VsJ Special thanks to Mark Hall-Patton for proofreading this script ------------------------------------------------------------ SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=CynicalCypher88 contribute to my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/CynicalHistorian LET'S CONNECT: https://www.facebook.com/cynicalcypher88 https://twitter.com/Cynical_History ------------------------------------------------------------ Wiki: The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California.[1] The news of gold brought some 300,000 people to California from the rest of the United States and abroad.[2] The sudden influx of immigration and gold into the money supply reinvigorated the American economy, and California became one of the few American states to go directly to statehood, in the Compromise of 1850. The Gold Rush initiated the California Genocide, with 100,000 Native Californians dying between 1848 and 1868. By the time it ended, California had gone from a thinly populated ex-Mexican territory to the home state of the first nominee for the Republican Party. The effects of the Gold Rush were substantial. Whole indigenous societies were attacked and pushed off their lands by the gold-seekers, called "forty-niners" (referring to 1849). The first to hear confirmed information of the gold rush were the people in Oregon, the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), and Latin America, and they were the first to start flocking to the state in late 1848. Of the 300,000 people who came to America during the Gold Rush, approximately half arrived by sea and half came overland on the California Trail and the Gila River trail; forty-niners often faced substantial hardships on the trip. While most of the newly arrived were Americans, the Gold Rush attracted tens of thousands from Latin America, Europe, Australia, and China. Agriculture and ranching expanded throughout the state to meet the needs of the settlers. San Francisco grew from a small settlement of about 200 residents in 1846 to a boomtown of about 36,000 by 1852. Roads, churches, schools and other towns were built throughout California. In 1849 a state constitution was written. The new constitution was adopted by referendum vote, and the future state's interim first governor and legislature were chosen. In September, 1850, California became a state. At the beginning of the Gold Rush, there was no law regarding property rights in the goldfields and a system of "staking claims" was developed. Prospectors retrieved the gold from streams and riverbeds using simple techniques, such as panning. Although the mining caused environmental harm, more sophisticated methods of gold recovery were developed and later adopted around the world. New methods of transportation developed as steamships came into regular service. ------------------------------------------------------------ Hashtags: #History #California #GoldRush #1849 #49ers #fortyniners
Views: 39659 The Cynical Historian
Chinese Miners in California
 
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All credit for documentary KEN BURNS PRESENTS THE WEST A FILM BY STEPHEN IVES goes to PBS. I purchased and posted the video solely for the education of my students.
Views: 503 Bobblehead George
PROSPECTING FOR PLACER GOLD   1849 CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH DOCUMENTARY 64444
 
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Made by Arthur Barr, this short film shows some of the technologies used by prospectors to find gold in the 1849 California Gold Rush. At 2:00, a prospector shows how a pan is used to sift river sand in search of gold flakes. At 2;24 a claim is staked out with a claim post. At 3:30 a rocker or cradle is made to sift gravel. At 3:53, wooden bars called riffers and a hopper to hold the sand and gravel are created from wood. At 4:40 the operation of the hopper is shown. At 6:17 a Long Tom sluice is shown, which used the power of the river to separate the sand and gold from the gravel, with gold trapped behind the riffle bars. At 8:00 gold flecks are recovered from the Long Tom via a pan. At 8:30, a series of riffle boxes are placed together to form a sluice box -- the best of all placer mining tools. Placer mining is the mining of stream bed (alluvial) deposits for minerals. This may be done by open-pit (also called open-cast mining) or by various surface excavating equipment or tunnelling equipment. Placer mining is frequently used for precious metal deposits (particularly gold) and gemstones, both of which are often found in alluvial deposits—deposits of sand and gravel in modern or ancient stream beds, or occasionally glacial deposits. The metal or gemstones, having been moved by stream flow from an original source such as a vein, are typically only a minuscule portion of the total deposit. Since gems and heavy metals like gold are considerably more dense than sand, they tend to accumulate at the base of placer deposits. It is important to note that placer deposits can be as young as a few years old, such as the Canadian Queen Charlotte beach gold placer deposits, or billions of years old like the Elliott Lake uranium paleoplacer within the Huronian Supergroup in Canada. The containing material in an alluvial placer mine may be too loose to safely mine by tunnelling, though it is possible where the ground is permanently frozen. Where water under pressure is available, it may be used to mine, move, and separate the precious material from the deposit, a method known as hydraulic mining, hydraulic sluicing or hydraulicking. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1580 PeriscopeFilm
Exploring Barkerville The historical Gold Rush Town
 
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After 2 days it was nice to tour the famous barkerville town site one of the more popular places during the caribou gold rush. The miners here were lucky to hit the motherlode just 50 feet below the surface. One guy claimed to get 98 ounces of gold in just one pan. the bill diller claim they recovered over 200 pounds of gold in just a 24 hour period. https://twitter.com/bullshitkorner https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bullshitkorner/415124691917952 http://www.bskorner.com Sound effects by Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com Royalty-free music by Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com
Views: 5584 Bullshitkorner
Calico Ghost Town - California, USA
 
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Calico is an old West mining town that has been around since 1881 during the largest silver strike in California. With its 500 mines, Calico produced over $20 million in silver ore over a 12-year span. When silver lost its value in the mid-1890's, Calico lost its population. The miner's packed up, loaded their mules and moved away abandoning the town that once gave them a good living. It became a "ghost town." Walter Knott purchased Calico in the 1950's architecturally restoring all but the five original buildings to look as they did in the 1880's. Calico received State Historical Landmark 782 and in 2005 was proclaimed by then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to be California's Silver Rush Ghost Town. Today Calico is part of the San Bernardino County Regional Parks system visited by people from around the country and all over the world. The park offers visitors an opportunity to share in its rich history and enjoy the natural beauty of the surrounding desert environment. Along with its history and attractions, Calico Ghost Town has shops, restaurants and offers camping and outdoor recreation not available at most of our other park facilities. Due to the historic nature of the town, not all areas are ADA accessible. CAUTION: Mines in the Calico area are extremely hazardous and must not be approached for any reason! Soundtrack.. Guts and Bourbon by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400032 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 68365 The Travel Channel
The California Gold Rush Experience: Facts, Miners, Timeline, Towns (1998)
 
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The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671255371/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0671255371&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=e466e8af410d510aab178d97d3765afc The first to hear confirmed information about gold in California were residents of Oregon, the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), western Mexico, and Central America. They were the first to go there in late 1848. All told, the news of gold brought some 300,000 people to California from the rest of the United States and abroad. Of the 300,000, approximately half arrived by sea and half came overland from the east, on the California Trail and the Gila River trail. The gold-seekers, called "forty-niners" (as a reference to 1849), often faced substantial hardships on the trip. While most of the newly arrived were Americans, the Gold Rush attracted tens of thousands from Latin America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. At first, the gold nuggets could be picked up off the ground. Later, gold was recovered from streams and riverbeds using simple techniques, such as panning. More sophisticated methods were developed and later adopted elsewhere. At its peak, technological advances reached a point where significant financing was required, increasing the proportion of gold companies to individual miners. Gold worth tens of billions of today's dollars was recovered, which led to great wealth for a few. However, many returned home with little more than what they had started with. The effects of the Gold Rush were substantial. San Francisco grew from a small settlement of about 200 residents in 1846 to a boomtown of about 36,000 by 1852. Roads and other towns were built throughout California. In 1849 a state constitution was written, and a governor and legislature were chosen. California became a state as part of the Compromise of 1850. New methods of transportation developed as steamships came into regular service. By 1869 railroads were built across the country from California to the eastern United States. Agriculture and ranching expanded throughout the state to meet the needs of the settlers. At the beginning of the Gold Rush, there was no law regarding property rights in the goldfields and a system of "staking claims" was developed. The Gold Rush also resulted in attacks on Native Americans, who were forcibly removed from their lands. An estimated 100,000 California Indians died between 1848 and 1868, and some 4,500 of them were murdered. Gold mining also caused environmental harm to rivers and lakes. Overnight California gained the international reputation as the "golden state".[138] Generations of immigrants have been attracted by the California Dream. California farmers,[139] oil drillers,[140] movie makers,[141] airplane builders,[142] and "dot-com" entrepreneurs have each had their boom times in the decades after the Gold Rush.[143] The literary history of the Gold Rush is reflected in the works of Mark Twain (The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County), Bret Harte (A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready), Joaquin Miller (Life Amongst the Modocs), and many others.[29][144] Included among the modern legacies of the California Gold Rush are the California state motto, "Eureka" ("I have found it"), Gold Rush images on the California State Seal,[145] and the state nickname, "The Golden State", as well as place names, such as Placer County, Rough and Ready, Placerville (formerly named "Dry Diggings" and then "Hangtown" during rush time), Whiskeytown, Drytown, Angels Camp, Happy Camp, and Sawyers Bar. The San Francisco 49ers National Football League team, and the similarly named athletic teams of California State University, Long Beach, are named for the prospectors of the California Gold Rush. In addition. the standard route shield of state highways in California is in the shape of a miner's spade to honor the California Gold Rush.[146][147] Today, aptly named State Route 49 travels through the Sierra Nevada foothills, connecting many Gold Rush-era towns such as Placerville, Auburn, Grass Valley, Nevada City, Coloma, Jackson, and Sonora.[148] This state highway also passes very near Columbia State Historic Park, a protected area encompassing the historic business district of the town of Columbia; the park has preserved many Gold Rush-era buildings, which are presently occupied by tourist-oriented businesses. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_gold_rush
Views: 6183 The Film Archives
Gold Rush   Mining Camps
 
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Views: 3424 MGH
Biggest Abandoned Town in California - The Ghost Town of Bodie! - Random land!
 
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Abandoned. What makes people leave a town and not even bring their belongings with them? Leave a town to rot. This, everyone, is the story of a Ghost town. Not just any ghost town, but the biggest, most sprawling, massive ghost town in California. The one with the bad reputation. The one that once, reportedly, inspired a little girl to write in her diary, "Goodbye God, we're going to Bodie" Come with me, Justin Scarred, on a trip through time and a lot of miles of dirt road as we explore California's biggest ghost town, Bodie! Shirts! http://livefastdiepoor.spreadshirt.com Funding! http://patreon.com/justinscarred WEBSITE! http://livefastdiepoor.com Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/justinscarred Instagram! https://instagram.com/livefastdiepoor/ Twitter! https://twitter.com/justinscarred More of our YouTube videos: http://youtube.com/livefastdiepoor My second (blog) channel: http://youtube.com/JustinScarred
Views: 83926 LiveFastDiePoor
THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH
 
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All credit for this video goes to HISTORY.COM, A&E, and LIONSGATE. It is posted here solely for the educational purposes of my students.
Views: 341 Bobblehead George
Bodie, California: Best Ghost Town In The West!
 
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Subscribe! http://full.sc/1o4TTJn TWITTER: http://full.sc/1h0GJ6n California's official gold mining ghost town, Bodie was once notorious as the wildest town in the West. From 1877 to 1888, the community swelled to more than 10,000 residents and produced over $35 million in gold and silver. Now a State Historic Park, Bodie is the largest unrestored ghost town in the West
Views: 385608 MoneyBags73
California Drought Brings Back Gold Fever | National Geographic
 
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California rivers, low from the recent drought, are ushering in a new gold rush. Professional miners—along with hobbyists like Bruce Meyer—are hurrying to uncover precious metals by panning, sniping, and prospecting at the base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more about the new gold rush: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140814-california-drought-gold-rush-water-climate-mining-panning/ VIDEOGRAPHER AND EDITOR: Spencer Millsap Should We Eat More Bugs? | National Geographic https://youtu.be/Ej59-ljxhoU National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 226774 National Geographic
Creepy Places Global: The California Gold Rush
 
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Website:http://creepyplaces.webs.com/ Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/pages/Creepy-Places-of-New-England/137391732977397 Sometimes, history is just as great and interesting as the paranormal. When gold was discovered in Northern California in 1848, thousands of people from around the world flocked to the area. Many new towns and settlements were created, and Charles takes you on a tour of three of these Gold Rush Towns: Placerville, Coloma, and Auburn. Another paranormal-free history based show as Creepy Places Global continues exploring Northern California. The History of the California Gold Rush at 1:37 Placerville at 6:09 Coloma at 8:22 Panning for Gold at 10:56 Auburn at 19:15 More on the Gold Rush: http://ceres.ca.gov/ceres/calweb/geology/goldrush.html
Views: 9647 NinjaCthulhu
Discovering a lost gold mining claim in the California desert - Going Alone
 
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I discovered this lost mining claim within a rock cairn atop an island of stone within the enormous flash flood plain called Siberia Wash. Imagine my surprise to look inside the rock pile and spot a metal tin secreted away within. Open this tin with me and find out what's inside. ---- My name is Kurt Bell and I am delighted that you have taken some time to share a little of The Good Life with me. I'm available on social media at the links below and can be reached via email at [email protected] Going Alone is an independent approach to living, uncovering what is real, and making peace with the facts of what is true no matter how the truth makes us feel. I upload at least one video a week for this series on my YouTube channel. The Good Life is a formulated plan of objectives and principals designed to help us live a more virtuous life in accord with sound reasoning. I upload at least one video a month for this series. Buy and read my book Going Alone here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0779LLWGV YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXFx-GHOyrQiiGqxE-J9fYA Facebook Main Page: https://www.facebook.com/LylesBrother Journal Page: https://www.facebook.com/Softypapa-337676096304661/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/softypapa/ Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/109050782163582511388 LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/kurt-bell-754416b Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/oldjapanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/softypapa CHANNEL CREDITS Softypapa avatar art by Hideki Lewis. See more of the artist's work here: http://eue-art.deviantart.com/ Channel Theme Music "Song For Kurt" used with permission by Nowherians. Discover more about the artist and their music here: http://nowherians.bandcamp.com/
Views: 59931 softypapa
Ghost Towns: Abandoned But Not Forgotten
 
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These towns, often far off the beaten path and rooted in the mining industry, couldn't survive when the gold, silver, copper, and coal were gone. Check out the stories behind these boom-towns. For more stories --- http://allday.com/ Follow our twitter accounts --- https://twitter.com/historyinpics Follow our Instagram -- http://instagram.com/historyphotographed -- http://instagram.com/itsabandoned 1. Goldfield, Arizona Goldfield, Arizona, as the name suggests, was a gold town that thrived in the 1890s, but was abandoned by the late 1920s. Today, Goldfield has been reconstructed as a tourist stop, with a focus on kitsch rather than historical accuracy. Rhyolite, Nevada Rhyolite, Nevada was named for silica-rich volcanic rock in its corner of Death Valley, and saw significant investment from Charles M. Schwab in the early 20th century. By 1907, the town even had its own stock exchange, but its population dwindled in the years afterward. Terlingua, Texas Terlingua, Texas was built up around mercury mining in the mid-1880s, but was abandoned in the 1940s when production dwindled. Today, Terlingua is mostly a tourist destination for visitors to nearby Big Bend National Park. Bodie, California The town of Bodie, California was founded in 1859 and was once California's third-largest city behind San Francisco and Sacramento. The town closed in 1962 after the local gold mine stopped producing and has since become a attraction for tourists. Thurmond, West Virginia During the heyday of coal mining in West Virginia, Thurmond was a prosperous town, but its population dwindled into the single digits by the 2000s. Today, much of Thurmond is owned by the U.S. National Park Service. Calico, California Calico, California was a booming silver-mining town during the 1880s, but was totally abandoned by 1907. Calico underwent extensive restoration in the 1950s under the direction of Walter Knott, of Knott’s Berry Farm fame, and became a tourist attraction for the state. Thistle, Utah The primary industry was servicing steam trains for rail companies, and saw a decline during the switch-over to diesel engines. The real incident that killed the town, however, was a 1983 landslide that flooded the city. Much of it remains submerged today. Virginia City, Montana Virginia City, Montana was founded on gold mining in 1863, but the gold ran out by the end of the century and the town was abandoned. Today Virginia City is owned by the state of Montana, and serves as a tourist stop for travelers headed for Yellowstone National Park. Kennecott, Alaska The copper mine in Alaska produced $200 million worth of copper ore between 1911 and 1938, but was too remote to survive when the mine ran dry in the early 40s. Kennecott became a tourist landmark by the 1980s, and was designated a historic landmark. Written By: Shea Huffman Edited By: Charlie Benavides Image Credit: Getty Images Music: YouTube Music Library
Views: 39915 AllDay
1849 trailer
 
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http://j.mp/1o9WZe5 The year is 1849, and gold has just been discovered in California. You decide to head out west, to seek fame and wealth in the approaching Gold Rush. Will you strike gold and become an overnight mining magnate? Or will you build your fortune bit by bit by supplying 49ers with pickaxes and blue jeans? 1849 is a city management game set during the California Gold Rush. Your task is to build towns, populate them with workers, and make sure that they are housed, fed, and entertained. You'll have to manage and coordinate extensive production and trade networks to make sure your towns thrive.
Views: 31916 GOG.com
Hydraulic Gold Mining in the Old West
 
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Gold in the creeks and rivers was easily found by panning and sluicing, but many of the richest mining areas were in old ancient river channels high above the existing water line. To mine these deposits effectively a different method was required... Hydraulic mining used high pressured water to literally wash away the hillside and release gold. The large hydraulic monitors would break apart the clays and gravel which would be run through a sluice box. Considerable gold was found using this method, and was a major boon to the economy of many of the mining camps throughout the West.
Views: 2111 Rare Gold Nuggets
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada - Part 1
 
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Probably less than a dozen people know about the historic miner’s cabin hidden away on this mining claim - and even fewer still know about the abundance of gold mines found here… It remains a secret because the people that do know where this is remain tight-lipped about it and this cabin and mines are located in an absolute black hole on topographic and other maps. There is simply nothing marked anywhere near here. With the contractors for the Forest Service, BLM, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) programs, et al working overtime (with taxpayer money) to get all of these historic mines erased, it is very nice to be introduced to some gold mines that are not (currently) in danger of being permanently closed. It is a shame that we have to wallow in such secrecy simply to protect a historically significant site from the very entities that should be preserving it, but such is the upside down world we live in. The two adits featured in this video appear to be quite old. I was able to find a couple of references to the mines consolidated on this claim in mining journals dating back to the turn of the last century and they were described as already having been worked for a while at that time. So, initial work here probably dates back to around the time of California’s “Gold Rush” era. The earliest gold miners in California were placer miners. However, when the easy pickings from the surface were worked out, they became lode miners and headed underground to start chasing the veins where the gold in the creeks originated from (some underground miners also chased the rich placer left behind by ancient river channels that were buried millions of years ago). The little hole by the creek under the huge boulder would have been referred to as a “coyote hole” by the miners of the time. These were in abundance along the creeks and rivers of California in the early days as the miners pursued gold flakes and nuggets back into the rocks and gravel lining the waterways. So, it seems likely that the small adit we visited first would have been the one developed initially and then the larger adit punching into the hard rock would have come along later. In further support of the idea that these mines are older rather than newer is that, although it may possibly have been there at one point, there was no sign of rail at the mines we visited. The claim owner also stated that he has never seen any sign of rail here either. It is not difficult to imagine a swarm of miners crawling all over these canyon walls like ants during the “Gold Rush” era, churning up the creeks and digging out coyote holes. This initial surge of miners, however, would have been followed by a more patient, more sophisticated group of miners that had an eye on heading underground. At the second adit shown in this video, for example, you could have had something like a father and son team or two brothers slowly working away at that lode mine for years, chasing those quartz veins and hauling load after load of ore and waste rock out in wheelbarrows. I’m giving more of a general feel for the area with these videos rather than showing every single bit of mining history present as both sides of this canyon are covered in mines and the remains of mining equipment. We’ll see more of that in the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines that I have explored: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 101158 TVR Exploring
Tumco Historic Townsite - Abandoned Gold Mining Town in California
 
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Driving back from doing errands in Blythe, California, I spotted a sign for Tumco Historic Townsite. Tumco, previously known as Hedges, was a small gold mining town at the edge of the Cargo Muchacho Mountains. The town was abandoned in 1905, resurrected in 1910, and then abandoned again some years later. Today there are only ruins to reveal the history of this old mining town. Thanks for watching! I hope you enjoy this video. LINKS Tumco Historic Townsite - https://www.blm.gov/visit/tumco-historic-mine *SHOW NOTES AND RESOURCES* *PRODUCT LINKS* - Our Camera Gear - https://kit.com/robertwitham/camera-gear - All Recommended Gear - https://kit.com/robertwitham *MUSIC* Music by Bensound - www.bensound.com - Ofelia's Dream - Memories *SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL* - Amazon Affiliate Link - https://amzn.to/307uDI5 - PayPal Donations - http://paypal.me/RobertWitham - Patreon (Two Meander) - https://www.patreon.com/twomeander *My Books* - How To Be A Successful 21st Century Nomad - https://robertwitham.com/books/how-to-be-a-successful-21st-century-nomad/ - Car Living - https://robertwitham.com/books/car-living/ - Minimalism - https://robertwitham.com/books/minimalism/ *SOCIAL MEDIA* Robert Witham - Website - https://robertwitham.com - YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/robertwitham - Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/robertwitham/ - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/wanderingminimalist - Twitter - https://twitter.com/robertwitham Two Meander - Website - https://twomeander.com - YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/twomeander - Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/twomeander/ - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/twomeander/ - Twitter - https://twitter.com/twomeander DISCLAIMER: This video description contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links I may receive a small commission. This helps support the channel and allows me to continue to make videos like this. Thank you for the support!
Views: 1582 Robert Witham
EXPLORATION | Gold Rush Ghost Town | Virginia City, MT
 
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The very much alive ghost town, Virginia City, Montana, is frozen in time. It is a remarkably well preserved old west Victorian gold mining town just 20 miles west of Yellowstone National Park. SOCIAL http://facebook.com/zhkopec https://snapchat.com/add/zhkopec http://instagram.com/zhkopec Extra footage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYXSsTg8erE
Views: 495 Kopec
10 Mysteries Of The Gold Rush!
 
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10 Mysteries Of The Gold Rush! From it’s true origins to the massive amount of gold found…stay tuned to number 1 to find out 10 facts YOU need to know about the Gold Rush! This top 10 brought to you by Zero2Hero!! Don't forget to subscribe here! https://goo.gl/NXuChu Click here to find out the Top 10 Unknown Underground Cities! https://youtu.be/ckrNmi5Lpxo Number 10: Didn't Start In 1849. Despite a lot of folks saying that the Gold Rush started in California in 1849, that wasn't truly the case. It's the most popular year of the California Gold Rush, there's no doubt about that. But the event that helped start the whole thing actually happened in 1848. Don't be confused, I'll explain. Like all good gold rushes, this one started out by accident. A group of people were digging near the American River in their attempt to build a saw mill. While they were digging up dirt to help make way for it, they found a gold nugget. A nugget is a small compacted form of gold that can be picked up. After finding this one, they searched the nearby ground and river and found even more nuggets. This led to a massive telling of what happened around the town they were in. Which, naturally, spread across the nation, and that gave many people who were tired of living in the east the chance to head west, make their fortunes, and live a better life. By the time most got there, it was 1849, but the initial gold rush technically started in 1848. But if you want to be even MORE technical, it REALLY started in 1884, when a shopkeeper in San Francisco got a bottle full of gold dust and put it in his shop for all to see. And that kicked off the series of events that would lead to the eventually Gold Rush In California. Number 9: Not The First Gold Rush In The US. As I noted, the California Gold Rush is one that is very popular in the history and lore of the United States. It inspired the NFL team the San Francisco 49ers, and even made a villain of the legends of the Gold Rush in an episode of "Scooby-Doo." But what people forget, at times, is that this WASN'T the first gold rush in the United States. That gold rush happened 50 years earlier. This earlier event happened in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, when a 17-pound gold nugget was found in the ground in the country. For the record, at the current gold price, of about $1,300 an ounce, that would be over $22,000 dollars worth of gold, and that was just one nugget! So just like the eventual California Gold Rush, a large group of fortune seekers went migrated to North Carolina to search for their own share of the gold. And, eventually, around 30,000 people were out digging for it. And they had a LOT of success. So much so that for the next 30 years, all the gold coins that were produced by the government were being made mostly by the gold that came from North Carolina. Just goes to show you that gold can be just about anywhere, and a gold rush can follow it if it's found. Number 8: Biggest Migration In US History. Before we get into the migration, take a moment to like this video and join the Zero2Hero community by using the buttons below! Let's talk about the early days of the United States, ok? At first, there were 13 colonies, and after the Revolutionary War, the colonies won their independence. Soon enough, the Louisiana Purchase was made, and thus expanded the US greatly, allowing more and more people to both live in the land and live comfortably. But we still weren't populating much of the, then current, United States yet. While there were plenty on the western side of the US, it wasn't a tamed land like it is now. Rather, it was a lot of wilderness, and a lot of unknowns. It would take a LOT of encouragement to get people to move west and try to settle it. Say...like a gold rush? It's a fact that a LOT of people went to California and surrounding areas over the course of the Gold Rush migration. But the migration was also the biggest in United States history! In March of 1848, the most predominant people in the soon-to-be state of California were Native Americans. Only about 800 settlers from the east were there. Fast forward 20 months and suddenly there were 100,000 non-native people in the state! Fast forward to 1850, and 300,000 people had showed up. And all of this helped lead to California becoming the 31st state in the country. Number 7: Americans Weren't The Only Ones Digging For Gold. Another thing you have to remember about the world at that time was that communication most definitely wasn't the best around. At the time, the railroads weren't built, and so getting a message out from East to West was a hazardous adventure. To that end, some of the first people to take advantage of the Gold Rush fever weren't the settlers in the East, but were, instead, people from Asia and South America.
Views: 3862 Zero2Hero
California Gold Rush of 1849
 
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hi
Views: 128006 Amy Cottle
Ghost Town 2.5 hours from Los Angeles. Old West Gold Rush Era Silver Mining Town Calico, California
 
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if you are in Los Angeles and are looking for a weekend road trip destination, check out this old gold rush era town called Calico, which is 2.5 hours drive towards Las Vegas, 3 minutes from 15 freeway. Skyline Sunglasses Los Angeles: http://amzn.to/2p2xAY9 Midnight Club: Los Angeles. Driving video game: http://amzn.to/2ozEPFb GTA V drive around Los Angeles: http://amzn.to/2oyfSLn Are you driving from Las Vegas and have $8 left in your pocket? Take a break in the ghost town and see what it looks like after 100 years of being populated by 2 thousand people! Calico, California, has been restored to the look of the silver rush era when it flourished, although many original buildings were removed and replaced instead with gingerbread architecture and false facades that tourists would expect to see in a Western-themed town; Most of the restored and newly built buildings are made of wood with a simple, rustic architecture and a severely weathered appearance. Some structures still stand dating back to the town's operational years: Lil's Saloon; the town office; the former home of Lucy Lane, which is now the main museum but was originally the town's post office and courthouse; Smitty's Gallery; the general store; and Joe's Saloon. There is also a replica of the schoolhouse on the site of the original building. The one-time homes of the town's Chinese citizens exist as ruins only; only a portion of one rock wall remains of the former "family" residential area on a nearby bluff. In November 1962, Calico Ghost Town was registered as a California Historical Landmark (Landmark #782) In 2002, Calico vied with Bodie in Mono County to be recognized as the Official State Ghost Town. In 2005, a compromise was finally reached when the State Senate and State Assembly agreed to list Bodie as the Official State Gold Rush Ghost Town and Calico the Official State Silver Rush Ghost Town. Today, the park operates mine tours, gunfight stunt shows, gold panning, several restaurants, the historic, 2 ft 6 in narrow gauge Calico & Odessa Railroad, a Mystery Shack. and a number of trinket stores. It is open every day except Christmas, and requires an entrance fee. Additional fees are required for some attractions. Overnight camping is also available. Special events are held throughout the year including a Spring Festival in May, Calico Days in early October, and a Ghost Town haunt in late October. The Calico Cemetery, which holds between 96 and 130 graves, has had burials in the 20th and 21st centuries
Views: 453 Dash Cam Tours
Columbia State Historic Park - Columbia, California - Historic Gold Mining Town
 
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Yesterday, the gold mining town of Columbia, California celebrated their 162nd birthday and Modesto News .org was on hand to capture the day on film. Being so isolated in the foothills of California, the town of Columbia remained untouched by the turn of the century innovations that changed the world 100 years ago. During the late 1930's and early 1940's the residents of Columbia, California looked around and realized they had something quite special in their midst, and approached the State Of California in an effort to have their town designated as an official State Park. The state agreed that the town should be preserved and in 1945 Columbia, California joined the State Park System. The Columbia State Historic Park offers educational entertainment for the entire family year round. The town is still an active town with hundreds of residents who call the State Park their home, and run the many shops that line the main street. The Columbia State Historic Park is only an hour drive from Modesto, California and is a must for every child in Modesto to experience. Modesto News .org is your one man news source in Modesto, California. It is your place to see our area through the eyes of Mick V. Rubalcava. You never know what is coming up next on Modesto News .org... Breaking action news, a celebrity interview, a live concert, or even a travel destination video like this one. Stay tuned for more Modesto News .org . Brought To You By: Crow Trading Company www.CrowTrading.com Burnside Body Shop www.BurnsideBodyShop.com The Modesto Art Walk www.ModestoArtWalk.com Genesis One Body & Soul www.GenesisOneBodyAndSoul.com http://www.ModestoNews.org All Rights Reserved - Copyright 2012
Views: 10357 Modesto News
Ghost Towns: Bodie, California
 
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Here is a video I made documenting our trip to Bodie, California. Bodie began as a small mining camp during the California Gold Rush and became a town as more and more prospectors came in search of fortune. By 1915, it was pretty much abandoned, but later became a state park in 1962. Today, it is preserved just as it was left. The state park sees about 200,000 visitors each year.
Views: 2708 Mike Blount
Exploring abandoned mine shaft with gold bearing quartz vein?
 
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Exploring abandoned mine shaft with gold bearing quartz vein? Support the upcoming adventure 4 MONTHS SOBER & NO TOBACCO PayPal.me/inzanebigmac Or [email protected] Zane Greene on Facebook for shit you won't see on youtube https://www.instagram.com/inzanegreene/ Sleeping bag jacket combo https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F303101740705 Chocolate mountains machine gun shells https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F303101764616 THIS is what desert gold country looks like !Where To Find Gold In The Southern California Desert! The Cargo Muchacho Mountains DESERT GOLD RUSH 2019! 3 OZs Or Bust! We are going hardcore gold mining guys! Desert GOLD! Drywashing for gold in s. California desert. Dry washing for gold in the southern California desert. We found some gold. Finding GOLD in the southern California Desert w/ Ty Ram & his pop's Mike Ram! #gold #goldmining #goldminer #desertgold #prospecting #goldrush #treasurehunting Dry washing in the southern California desert. We found some gold. A beautiful drive to GOLD COUNTRY! Southern California desert GOLD MINING!
Life in a Mining Town
 
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USW International President, Leo W. Gerard, talks about what it's like to grow up in a mining town.
Views: 1220 Steelworkers
The Gold Mining Ghost Town Tour Of Bodie, California
 
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The Gold Mining Ghost Town Tour Of Bodie, California The Gold Mining Ghost Town Tour Of Bodie, California The Gold Mining Ghost Town Tour Of Bodie, California Take a tour of Bodie, California's official gold mining ghost town, once notorious as the wildest town in the West. Crooked houses, a classroom left mid-lesson and dusty coffins: Incredible photos of eerie abandoned gold rush town in California A once bustling gold rush town in Mono County, California, now stands deserted - many of the buildings lie abandoned, yet are still furnished with the personal belongings of their previous owners. The town of Bodie was named after Waterman Body, who first found gold there in 1859. By its peak in the 1880s, it was a bustling gold rush town with a population of around 10,000. In the late 1880s, Bodie's population began to decrease as new gold sources were discovered elsewhere and the miners began to move away. The town was devastated by a large fire in 1892 and by 1910, the population had plummeted to 698, with the last local newspaper ceasing publication shortly after in 1912. It retained a small population for a few decades more, despite being badly burned by another fire in the 1930s. Bodie was officially made a state park in the 1960s, preserving the remaining buildings so future generations could enjoy them. English photographer Cat Burton visited the eerie town of Bodie, which used to have a population of 10,000, to see a real life American ghost town. The 29-year-old, of Donington, Lincolnshire, says: 'I was on a road trip around California and a few people had recommended visiting Bodie, and I'm so glad I made the time to stop here. 'The most fascinating thing I saw while I was there was all the interiors of the buildings. 'After being abandoned for so long, you would expect them to be destroyed and empty. Instead, there are a wide variety of buildings still full of items. 'Aside from the dust, you could almost imagine someone living there now. All the buildings were fascinating, from the workshops full of tools to the shop with products still on display. The morgue was morbid but captivating, with dusty coffins stacked up. 'The school was probably one of my favourites as it gave me a lot of things to research; I loved the old cracked globe in the school window especially.' Cat says: 'Most people I show these images to are really fascinated by Bodie. These are the places that most of us only hear about in films or stories, but to see one up close and be able to show other people how it looked is wonderful. 'The workshops had all sorts of rusty containers and tools, and a lot of the houses still had old beds, chairs and tables in, as well as personal belongings. 'The school had a fully furnished classroom, complete with writing on the boards and books on the desks. It is so full of items it looks like everyone just vanished midway through a lesson.'
Views: 507 HereComsFight
California Gold Rush Routes
 
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Recorded with https://screencast-o-matic.com
Views: 272 AnneMarie Irwin
Calico an Old West Mining Town ( Ghost Town )
 
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Calico is an old West mining town that has been around since 1881 during the largest silver strike in California. With its 500 mines, Calico produced over $20 million in silver ore over a 12-year span. When silver lost its value in the mid-1890's, Calico lost its population. The miner's packed up, loaded their mules and moved away abandoning the town that once gave them a good living. It became a "ghost town." Walter Knott purchased Calico in the 1950's architecturally restoring all but the five original buildings to look as they did in the 1880's. Calico received State Historical Landmark 782 and in 2005 was proclaimed by then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to be California's Silver Rush Ghost Town. Today Calico is part of the San Bernardino County Regional Parks system visited by people from around the country and all over the world. The park offers visitors an opportunity to share in its rich history and enjoy the natural beauty of the surrounding desert environment. Along with its history and attractions, Calico Ghost Town has shops, restaurants and offers camping and outdoor recreation not available at most of our other park facilities. Due to the historic nature of the town, not all areas are ADA accessible. CAUTION: Mines in the Calico area are extremely hazardous and must not be approached for any reason! Soundtrack.. Guts and Bourbon by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400032 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 1206 The Travel Channel
Boom Towns
 
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Views: 6045 Cole Harriman
California's record drought is spurring a mini gold rush in the Sierra Nevada foothills that drew ho
 
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HERE IN THE SIERRA NEVADA FOOTHILLS, WATER LEVELS ARE AT RECORD LOWS. AND THAT'S OPENED UP NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR GOLD PROSPECTING. SOUNDBITE: Tim Amavisca, amateur gold prospector: "With the drought going on, we're able to dig in more locations that wouldn't be accessible at later times." CALIFORNIA'S DROUGHT HAS SPURRED A MINI GOLD RUSH IN THE SAME REGION THAT ATTRACTED FORTUNE SEEKERS IN THE EIGHTEEN- HUNDREDS. SOUNDBITE Rudy Price, amateur gold prospector: "I do understand that it's a dramatic impact on everybody during a drought that's this severe, but at the same token I'm taking advantage of it." THE WARM, DRY WINTER IS BRINGING MANY FIRST-TIME PROSPECTORS TO THIS MINING SUPPLY STORE. SOUNDBITE Frank Sullivan, co-owner, Pioneer Mining Supplies: "The rivers being low makes for business being good. A lot of people's having fun. I've seen a lot of new gold coming through the door." THESE MODERN-DAY GOLD MINERS DON'T EXPECT TO STRIKE IT RICH, BUT THE PROSPECT KEEPS THEM PANNING. SOUNDBITE: Trevor Whitehead, amateur gold prospector "It's more of a hobby, but obviously if we hit a nice pocket, yeah, I would love to make some money." SO OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS IN RIVERBEDS THAT HAVEN'T BEEN EXPOSED IN DECADES. OFFERING AT LEAST ONE SILVER - OR RATHER GOLD - LINING DURING CALIFORNIA'S RECORD DROUGHT. NATSOT: "If you see a good size flake, that's when you get excited." TERRY CHEA, ASSOCIATED PRESS, COLFAX, CALIFORNIA You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8182f8bf04486889b1752f5b352ca87c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 251 AP Archive
Gold Rush Cali : The Secret Location S1E6
 
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In this episode of gold rush california, earl mom tank and brandon head up stream about 3 miles to seek gold in a new location brandon had been eye balling for sometime now.. Sampling around they come across a little bit of fine gold but never hit bedrock...
Views: 5078 brandon hart
Exploring The Abandoned Crystal Palace Mine
 
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As I was struggling to explain in the video during my graceful, acrobatic leap off of the quartz ledge, a local historian advised us that during World War II, this abandoned mine was worked not for gold (which is what was originally mined here), but for its crystals that were used in radios. Google “crystal oscillator" if you’re curious how that works… During World War II, many American mines that extracted minerals such as gold and silver that were not considered essential to the war effort were ordered closed by the U.S. government. By contrast, mines that pursued tungsten or other such minerals (or crystals) were aggressively supported. Going farther back, there is a story the old-timers told in the past (unfortunately, these old hands are no longer with us) about a large group of Mexican miners that used to work an unknown section of the canyon where this mine is located. The story from the old-timers is that when the Mexican Revolution (which started in 1910) really started getting serious, that the Mexicans were compelled to return home. So, one day, an incredibly long mule train, loaded down with ore and equipment wound its way up and out of the canyon on the long trail back to Mexico. These Mexican miners never returned. I don’t know if that story is true (but it came from reliable sources) and I don’t know if the Mexican miners were working the quartz veins shown in this video. However, there are only four mines in this canyon and I KNOW it wasn’t two of those four. Therefore, it is a distinct possibility and it is worth mentioning, I believe. We were quite impressed by how extensively this quartz zone had been worked on both the surface and underground. Whether it was Mexican miners or someone else, they really worked this canyon thoroughly! I would love to see pictures of how it looked then. Early written descriptions of this mine indicate that a simple stamp mill was sufficient for milling the ore since the quartz veins harbor almost no sulfide. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21465 TVR Exploring
California drought spurs mini gold rush in Sierra Nevada foothills
 
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Tim Amavisca and his teenage daughter Hailey are spending some time in the Californian wilderness panning for gold. "The game plan was, move a couple boulders, try to get to bedrock, spend time with the daughter and hopefully find some gold." he explains. "With the drought going on, we're able to dig in more locations that wouldn't be accessible at later times" he says. Leaning over a bed of rocks in waterproof overalls, Amavisca reaches into the river and scoops shovelfuls of dirt into a plastic bucket. He and his daughter then pour the dirt into a sluice box that's used to trap gold flakes on textured rubber mats. Another amateur prospector Rudy Price sources the dry rocks of the Bear River with a shovel and pan, surveying the riverbed for good spots for prospecting. "I do understand that it's a dramatic impact on everybody during a drought that's this severe, but at the same token I'm taking advantage of it," says Price. The drought is bringing in many first-time prospectors to Pioneer Mining Supplies in the Gold Rush-era town of Auburn. The store sells shovels, buckets, pans, rubber boots, maps and mining books, as well as more advanced prospecting equipment such as sluice boxes and gold concentrators. Frank Sullivan, who opened the mining store nearly 40 years ago, says business has increased by 20 to 25 percent because of the drought. "Oh yeah, it's been good for business. I do live in the mountains so I don't like to see the drought. But the rivers being low makes for business being good. A lot of people's having fun. I've seen a lot of new gold coming through the door." Sullivan is concerned about the lack of rain because he lives in the mountains and worries about forest fires. With good jobs in short supply and gold selling for more than $1,300 an ounce, many local residents are prospecting to supplement their incomes Sullivan sold four-foot metal sluice box to amateur prospector Trevor Whitehead and his friend. "It's more of a hobby, but obviously if we hit a nice pocket, then yeah, I would love to make some money," says Whitehead. He says water levels at the North Fork of the American River are about two feet below normal, which has opened up new areas for gold panning. One of the worst droughts in California history has prompted the state and federal governments to severely cut water supplies to farms and cities. It's also left rivers and streams with dangerously low water levels, putting fish and wildlife at risk, as Jeff Kitchen, a hydrologist with the USGS California Water Science Center explains. "The stream flow in many of our rivers is probably about 10 percent or less of what we would normally expect this time of year. So there's a very significant, noticeable drop in what we would normally see." But for now gold diggers are making the most of the unusually warm, dry winter. Amavisca, who recently left the military, has been prospecting several times a week this winter, a season when it's usually raining and river levels are too high for gold panning. "If you see a good-sized flake, that's when you get excited," says Amavisca, who lives in Sacramento, as he looked for gold in one of the sluice box trays. The father daughter team then proudly showed of vial containing flakes of gold, a good day's work prospecting. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ea52d348fa56ea3f0fc9ec87d00619b8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 3083 AP Archive
Julian - San Diego Attractions - California Ghost Towns
 
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California Travel Expert Veronica Hill of http://www.CaliforniaTravelExpert.com and the California Essential Guide (http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id428163062?mt=8) app visits Julian California in this episode of "California Travel Tips." This charming little ghost town — located an hour from San Diego — comes alive during the fall, when it celebrates the famous Julian apple harvest. Bring along a light jacket as you explore the town's quaint stores, restaurants and delicious homemade apple pies. Julian's mining history dates back to 1869, when San Diego experienced its first (and only) Gold Rush. Today, Main Street is filled with dozens of fun shops and attractions. You can hitch a ride on a horse and buggy, do a bit of wine tasting, or get a Western-style portrait taken at Grandpa's Old Time Photo. To learn more about Julian's mining history, join a tour at Eagle and High Peak Mine, located at the end of C Street. Train rides are available on the Smith Ranch and Julian Railroad by appointment. Kids will enjoy panning for gold at the Julian Mining Company, or getting an old-fashioned phosphate at the Miner's Diner soda fountain. But the real draw in Julian is the apple pie, and visitors are fiercely divided on who makes the best. I'm partial to Julian Pie Company, a cozy little diner with a loyal following. Be sure to get here early, as lines quickly form out the door. Once you've had your fill of pie, walk off the calories with a tour of Julian's pioneer cemetery and historic Gold Rush buildings. The Jacoby Building, built in 1897, was the town's original general store. The Wilcox Building, which dates back to 1872, once served as a stage coach stop and Julian's post office. If you want to spend the night, consider staying in the Julian hotels. The Julian Gold Rush Hotel, which was built in 1897, is one of California's best B&Bs, and well worth a visit. Music by Kevin MacLeod at http://www.Incompetech.com SUBSCRIBE! http://tinyurl.com/p2fveuj LIKE ME ON FACEBOOK http://tinyurl.com/nqx9osq CIRCLE ME ON GOOGLE PLUS http://tinyurl.com/odkmbqk FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER https://twitter.com/Californiatips FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/californiatraveltips BUY MY APPS! California Essential Guide App: ITUNES: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id428163062?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.ca.essential.guide568&hl=en Yosemite Travel Essentials App: ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=606694986&mt=8 DISNEYLAND INSIDER'S TRAVEL GUIDE ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/ua/app/disneyland-insiders-travel/id528739310?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.disney.guide&hl=en
Views: 38677 California Travel Tips
Gold Rush   Hydraulic Mining
 
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History Teachers - Buy history resources for your classes including worksheets, homeworks, tests, and presentations at: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Patrick-Gray Find extra credit materials for your own classroom and make a donation at: http://mrgrayhistory.blogspot.com/
Views: 15564 MGH
10 Real Haunted Ghost Towns to See in America!
 
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Want to visit a REAL ghost town? Spooky abandoned post-apocalyptic villages aren’t just the stuff of movies - there are plenty right here in America, and some are said to be haunted! 1. Bodie, California This National Historic Landmark is a perfectly preserved example of the late nineteenth century gold mining towns of California. Rumor has it, any visitor who tries to sneak off with an artifact from this ghost town will be cursed with bad luck! 2. St. Elmo, Colorado St. Elmo was a lively mining center with a booming population of 2000 until the local railroad closed down. Apparently, the ghost of former resident Annabelle Stark keeps watch over the town. 3. Centralia, Pennsylvania Centralia is home to 10 stubborn people who refuse to move and was the main inspiration for the horror movie Silent Hill. A mine fire which has been burning under the town since 1962 has caused most residents to leave over the years. 4. Bannack, Montana With a thriving population of 10,000 it was nicknamed the New Eldorado by the hopeful prospectors. It also once had an outlaw gang leader as its sheriff. Each July, there’s a re-enactment festival celebrating the town’s former glory. 5. Cahawba, Alabama Cahawba was once the capital of Alabama but today is an archeological park open to visitors. You can wander around and view the many abandoned streets and ruins of this formerly important governmental center. 6. Rhyolite, Nevada First established as a mining camp near Death Valley in 1905, Rhyolite saw its peak during the American gold rush. It’s a great testament of the boom and bust cycle of this era. 7. Terlingua, Texas Once a district of mining villages, today a ghost town, reduced to several closed mines and many abandoned industrial facilities, businesses and homes. However there’s still a working saloon for those seeking the authentic Old West experience. 8. Oatman, Arizona Located in the Black Mountains it became famous when 10 million dollars worth of gold was discovered in the area. Wild burros now roam the streets and gunfights are staged on the weekends. 9. Glenrio, Texas Formerly known as Rock Island it was a railway town which fell into disuse when Interstate 40 bypassed the community in 1973. Visit the Phillips 66 Service Station and other once-busy buildings that are now ghosts of their former glory. 10. Kennecott, Alaska One of the most remote ghost towns in America, is an old copper mining town. Virtually abandoned since the Depression in the 1930’s, it now has guided tours allowing visitors to explore the abandoned buildings frozen in time… What’s the spookiest place you’ve visited? Comment below!
Views: 17104 Destination Tips
Day 2 At The Gold Rush Mining Camps!!! AWESOME DAY!!!! Metal Detecting
 
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In this episode we head back to the awesome California gold rush mining camps! We were in for a HUGE surprise! We are located in the gold country of California and we metal detect old mines and old mining towns and buildings. In our videos you will see us metal detecting and digging up old silver and gold coin, relics from the gold rush and civil war. If you enjoy watching metal Detecting videos then you are in the right place. We give our viewers and exciting experience that will leave them wanting to jump in the car and head out to go metal detecting. So get comfortable and get ready to see some amazing metal detecting finds. If you are thinking about upgrading to the Garrett AT Max, Garrett AT Pro or the Garrett AT Pro Pointer I highly recommend clicking on the links I put next to the equipment we use. Not only will it give you the best deal on the items but it will help us out a ton to keep us going on making these videos as they are affiliate links. Thank you for your support on keeping the dream alive! Equipment we use: Garrett AT Max http://amzn.to/2sdDv1Y Garrett AT Pro http://amzn.to/2BbPYGo Garrett AT Pin pointer http://amzn.to/2E65PsQiiij Camera-GoPro 6 http://amzn.to/our
We find the Mother Lode and the Gold Belt ! Two abandoned mines in the Sheep creek area
 
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Best mine exploration video yet! We climb to the top of a mountain and find a standing tram tower with a blacksmiths shop old equipment, machines and a mine complete with a locomotive and mine cars.