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New Hartley disaster
 
05:03
The Hartley Colliery Disaster (also known as the Hartley Pit Disaster or Hester Pit Disaster) was a coal mining accident in Northumberland, England that occurred on Thursday 16 January 1862 resulting in the deaths of 204 men. The beam of the pit's pumping engine broke and fell down the shaft, trapping the men below. The disaster prompted a change in UK law that henceforth required all collieries to have at least two independent means of escape.
Views: 1004 Mine Accidents
The beach at Seaton Sluice, Northumberland, UK
 
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SEE MY TRAVEL GROUP ON FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/MotorhomeFullTime Here we can see the glorious wind swept beaches of Seaton Sluice, a village in Northumberland which lies on the coast at the mouth of the Seaton Burn, midway between Whitley Bay and Blyth. It has a population of about 3,000 people today. Salt was produced at Seaton Sluice from at least 1236. Then it belonged to Tynemouth Priory. In 1100 the land became the property of the Hubert de Laval, nephew by marriage to William the Conqueror. The de Lavals (or Delavals) gave their name to the place they lived : Seaton Delaval, the name 'Seaton' being derived from Old English meaning a settlement (ton) by the sea. A harbour was created in the Middle Ages for the export of salt and later coal. However the harbour was prone to silting, which limited access by ships. This problem was tackled by Sir Ralph Delaval (1622--1691), who had a pier constructed, and sluice gates that trapped the seawater at each high tide. At low tide the gates were opened, flushing the sand out of the harbour. Henceforth the village became known as Seaton Sluice. The harbour remained like this until the 1760s, when Sir John Humphry Delaval had a new entrance made for the harbour by blasting a channel through solid rock, providing what was known as 'The Cut', 16m deep, 9m wide and 250m long. The new channel was opened in 1763 and, as a result, the land between the old harbour entrance and the new channel became an island, known as 'Rocky Island'. The new channel could be sealed off at both ends to allow loading to continue no matter what the state of the tide. On the other side of the old channel, opposite Rocky Island, was a ballast hill known as Sandy Island, built up from the ballast of ships entering the harbour. The ballast hill can still be seen. In 1777, 177 ships sailed out of the harbour carrying 48,000 tonnes of coal. The coal was brought to the harbour from nearby collieries via wagonways, with coal wagons being drawn by horses. Salt continued to be exported from Seaton Sluice until 1798, when a salt tax put an end to the trade. Even with the harbour improvements made by the Delaval family, the harbour was still limited in the size of ships that it could handle. Meanwhile, competing ports such as Blyth, to the north, and the Tyne to the south spent money improving the dock facilities. The new Northumberland Dock on the Tyne was completed in 1857. Seaton Sluice found it difficult to compete with these larger facilities. A further blow to the coal trade from Seaton Sluice was the Hartley pit disaster that occurred at the village of New Hartley, about 3.2km west of Seaton Sluice. The Hester Pit was the main source of local coal. However, in 1862 there was a disaster when the beam of the pumping engine broke and fell down the only mineshaft, blocking it and trapping the miners underground. In all, 204 miners perished, in some cases several from the same family. The disaster led to the working practice in future mines, that there should always be two shafts. The loss of production from the Hester pit spelt the end of the coal trade from Seaton Sluice, and it became a quiet backwater. An attempt in the early part of the 20th century to develop the village as a tourist resort failed as a railway line, intended to lead north up the coast from Whitley Bay, was partly constructed but then abandoned as the first world war intervened. The remains of railway bridges and embankments can still be seen.
Views: 598 Alan Heath
The bridge at Seaton Sluice, Northumberland, UK
 
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SEE MY TRAVEL GROUP ON FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/MotorhomesOnLine Here we can see the glorious wind swept beaches of Seaton Sluice, a village in Northumberland which lies on the coast at the mouth of the Seaton Burn, midway between Whitley Bay and Blyth. It has a population of about 3,000 people today. Salt was produced at Seaton Sluice from at least 1236. Then it belonged to Tynemouth Priory. In 1100 the land became the property of the Hubert de Laval, nephew by marriage to William the Conqueror. The de Lavals (or Delavals) gave their name to the place they lived : Seaton Delaval, the name 'Seaton' being derived from Old English meaning a settlement (ton) by the sea. A harbour was created in the Middle Ages for the export of salt and later coal. However the harbour was prone to silting, which limited access by ships. This problem was tackled by Sir Ralph Delaval (1622--1691), who had a pier constructed, and sluice gates that trapped the seawater at each high tide. At low tide the gates were opened, flushing the sand out of the harbour. Henceforth the village became known as Seaton Sluice. The harbour remained like this until the 1760s, when Sir John Humphry Delaval had a new entrance made for the harbour by blasting a channel through solid rock, providing what was known as 'The Cut', 16m deep, 9m wide and 250m long. The new channel was opened in 1763 and, as a result, the land between the old harbour entrance and the new channel became an island, known as 'Rocky Island'. The new channel could be sealed off at both ends to allow loading to continue no matter what the state of the tide. On the other side of the old channel, opposite Rocky Island, was a ballast hill known as Sandy Island, built up from the ballast of ships entering the harbour. The ballast hill can still be seen. In 1777, 177 ships sailed out of the harbour carrying 48,000 tonnes of coal. The coal was brought to the harbour from nearby collieries via wagonways, with coal wagons being drawn by horses. Salt continued to be exported from Seaton Sluice until 1798, when a salt tax put an end to the trade. Even with the harbour improvements made by the Delaval family, the harbour was still limited in the size of ships that it could handle. Meanwhile, competing ports such as Blyth, to the north, and the Tyne to the south spent money improving the dock facilities. The new Northumberland Dock on the Tyne was completed in 1857. Seaton Sluice found it difficult to compete with these larger facilities. A further blow to the coal trade from Seaton Sluice was the Hartley pit disaster that occurred at the village of New Hartley, about 3.2km west of Seaton Sluice. The Hester Pit was the main source of local coal. However, in 1862 there was a disaster when the beam of the pumping engine broke and fell down the only mineshaft, blocking it and trapping the miners underground. In all, 204 miners perished, in some cases several from the same family. The disaster led to the working practice in future mines, that there should always be two shafts. The loss of production from the Hester pit spelt the end of the coal trade from Seaton Sluice, and it became a quiet backwater. An attempt in the early part of the 20th century to develop the village as a tourist resort failed as a railway line, intended to lead north up the coast from Whitley Bay, was partly constructed but then abandoned as the first world war intervened. The remains of railway bridges and embankments can still be seen.
Views: 671 Alan Heath
From Seaton Sluice to St Mary's Lighthouse, Whitley Bay
 
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SEE MY HISTORY PAGE ON FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alan-Heaths-History-Page/173472422695696 A view from Seaton Sluice showing the North Sea on an August evening. Here we can see the glorious wind swept beaches of Seaton Sluice, a village in Northumberland which lies on the coast at the mouth of the Seaton Burn, midway between Whitley Bay and Blyth. It has a population of about 3,000 people today. Salt was produced at Seaton Sluice from at least 1236. Then it belonged to Tynemouth Priory. In 1100 the land became the property of the Hubert de Laval, nephew by marriage to William the Conqueror. The de Lavals (or Delavals) gave their name to the place they lived : Seaton Delaval, the name 'Seaton' being derived from Old English meaning a settlement (ton) by the sea. A harbour was created in the Middle Ages for the export of salt and later coal. However the harbour was prone to silting, which limited access by ships. This problem was tackled by Sir Ralph Delaval (1622--1691), who had a pier constructed, and sluice gates that trapped the seawater at each high tide. At low tide the gates were opened, flushing the sand out of the harbour. Henceforth the village became known as Seaton Sluice. The harbour remained like this until the 1760s, when Sir John Humphry Delaval had a new entrance made for the harbour by blasting a channel through solid rock, providing what was known as 'The Cut', 16m deep, 9m wide and 250m long. The new channel was opened in 1763 and, as a result, the land between the old harbour entrance and the new channel became an island, known as 'Rocky Island'. The new channel could be sealed off at both ends to allow loading to continue no matter what the state of the tide. On the other side of the old channel, opposite Rocky Island, was a ballast hill known as Sandy Island, built up from the ballast of ships entering the harbour. The ballast hill can still be seen. In 1777, 177 ships sailed out of the harbour carrying 48,000 tonnes of coal. The coal was brought to the harbour from nearby collieries via wagonways, with coal wagons being drawn by horses. Salt continued to be exported from Seaton Sluice until 1798, when a salt tax put an end to the trade. Even with the harbour improvements made by the Delaval family, the harbour was still limited in the size of ships that it could handle. Meanwhile, competing ports such as Blyth, to the north, and the Tyne to the south spent money improving the dock facilities. The new Northumberland Dock on the Tyne was completed in 1857. Seaton Sluice found it difficult to compete with these larger facilities. A further blow to the coal trade from Seaton Sluice was the Hartley pit disaster that occurred at the village of New Hartley, about 3.2km west of Seaton Sluice. The Hester Pit was the main source of local coal. However, in 1862 there was a disaster when the beam of the pumping engine broke and fell down the only mineshaft, blocking it and trapping the miners underground. In all, 204 miners perished, in some cases several from the same family. The disaster led to the working practice in future mines, that there should always be two shafts. The loss of production from the Hester pit spelt the end of the coal trade from Seaton Sluice, and it became a quiet backwater. An attempt in the early part of the 20th century to develop the village as a tourist resort failed as a railway line, intended to lead north up the coast from Whitley Bay, was partly constructed but then abandoned as the first world war intervened. The remains of railway bridges and embankments can still be seen.
Views: 711 Alan Heath
History of the United States Republican Party | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States Republican Party 00:03:31 1 Ideological beginnings 00:07:27 2 Organizational beginnings 00:08:22 3 Establishing a national party and opposition 00:10:57 4 Civil War and Republican dominance: 1860–1896 00:12:46 4.1 Reconstruction: freedmen, carpetbaggers and scalawags 00:17:10 4.2 Gilded Age: 1877–1890 00:19:39 4.3 Ethnocultural politics: pietistic Republicans versus liturgical Democrats 00:22:04 5 Progressive Era: 1896–1932 00:28:04 6 Progressives and liberals 00:31:33 7 Political firsts for women and minorities 00:33:38 8 Fighting the New Deal coalition: 1932–1980 00:34:53 8.1 1933–1938 00:39:00 8.2 1939–1952 00:42:48 8.3 Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon: 1952–1974 00:43:57 8.4 Citizens for Eisenhower 00:45:58 8.5 Richard Nixon and Barry Goldwater 00:50:55 8.6 Moderate Republicans of 1960–1980 00:54:34 8.7 Realignment: the South becomes Republican 00:55:59 8.7.1 1964–1972 00:58:15 8.7.1.1 Southern strategy 01:02:48 9 From Ronald Reagan to the Bush: 1980–2008 01:03:01 9.1 Reagan Revolution 01:06:37 9.2 Congressional ascendancy in 1994 01:09:52 9.3 Neoconservatives 01:11:00 9.4 Second Bush era 01:16:43 10 Challenging the Barack Obama administration: 2009–2016 01:19:39 10.1 2012–2016 01:24:10 11 2016 elections and presidency of Donald Trump 01:28:49 11.1 Demographic shifts since 2009 01:30:06 12 See also 01:30:33 13 Notes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the world's oldest extant political parties. The party values reflect economic conservatism, classical conservatism (modern day American conservatism) and corporate liberty rights. It is the second oldest existing political party in the United States after its primary rival, the Democratic Party. The party emerged in 1854 to combat the Kansas–Nebraska Act, an act that dissolved the terms of the Missouri Compromise and allowed slave or free status to be decided in the territories by popular sovereignty. The early Republican Party had almost no presence in the Southern United States, but by 1858 it had enlisted former Whigs and former Free Soil Democrats to form majorities in nearly every Northern state. With its election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 and its success in guiding the Union to victory in the American Civil War and abolishing slavery, the party came to dominate the national political scene until 1932. The Republican Party at its beginning consisted of African-American and White Northern Protestants, businessmen, small business owners, professionals, factory workers, and farmers. It was pro-business, supporting banks, the gold standard, railroads and high tariffs to protect factory workers and grow industry faster. Under William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, it emphasized an expansive foreign policy. The GOP lost its majorities during the Great Depression (1929–1940). Instead, the Democrats under Franklin D. Roosevelt formed a winning New Deal coalition, which was dominant from 1932 through 1964. That coalition collapsed in the mid-1960s, partly because of white Southern Democrats' disaffection with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Republicans won five of the six presidential elections from 1968 to 1988, with Ronald Reagan as the party's iconic conservative hero. From 1992 to 2016, the Republican candidate has been elected to the White House in three of the seven presidential elections. Two of these (the 2000 and 2016 elections) saw George W. Bush and Donald Trump losing the popular vote, but winning the Electoral College. A similar situation in which Republicans won the Electoral College, but lost the popular vote were the 1876 and 1888 elections. The Republican Party expanded its base throughout the South after 1968 (excepting 1976), largely due to its strength among socially conservative white evangelical Protestants and traditionalist Roman Catholics. As white Democrats in th ...
Views: 48 wikipedia tts
Timeline of the presidency of Harry S. Truman | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:13:36
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Timeline of the presidency of Harry S. Truman 00:00:16 1 1945 00:00:26 1.1 April 00:03:32 1.2 May 00:07:48 1.3 June 00:11:23 1.4 July 00:14:54 1.5 August 00:17:21 1.6 September 00:19:35 1.7 October 00:22:55 1.8 November 00:24:57 1.9 December 00:28:39 2 1946 00:33:13 3 1947 00:34:06 4 1948 00:34:15 4.1 January 00:36:54 4.2 February 00:37:34 4.3 June 00:38:08 4.4 November 00:38:30 5 1949 00:38:39 5.1 January 00:41:41 5.2 February 00:44:06 5.3 April 00:45:00 5.4 May 00:45:12 5.5 June 00:46:35 5.6 September 00:49:04 5.7 December 00:49:38 6 1950 00:52:18 7 1951 00:52:27 7.1 January 01:00:27 7.2 February 01:01:27 7.3 March 01:04:16 7.4 April 01:04:51 7.5 August 01:09:12 7.6 November 01:10:37 8 1952 01:13:16 9 1953 Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The presidency of Harry S. Truman began on April 12, 1945 when Harry S. Truman became president upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt in the last months of World War II, and ended on January 20, 1953.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts