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Quantum Cryptography Explained
 
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This episode is brought to you by Squarespace: http://www.squarespace.com/physicsgirl With recent high-profile security decryption cases, encryption is more important than ever. Much of your browser usage and your smartphone data is encrypted. But what does that process actually entail? And when computers get smarter and faster due to advances in quantum physics, how will encryption keep up? http://physicsgirl.org/ ‪http://twitter.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://facebook.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://instagram.com/thephysicsgirl http://physicsgirl.org/ Help us translate our videos! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7DdEm33SyaTDtWYGO2CwdA&tab=2 Creator/Editor: Dianna Cowern Writer: Sophia Chen Animator: Kyle Norby Special thanks to Nathan Lysne Source: http://gva.noekeon.org/QCandSKD/QCand... http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/n... https://epic.org/crypto/export_contro... http://fas.org/irp/offdocs/eo_crypt_9... Music: APM and YouTube
Views: 261028 Physics Girl
Quantum Hardcores and Quantum Public-Key Cryptosystems - Invited Talk 2013 - Lisbon, Portugal
 
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Dr. Tomoyuki Yamakami was invited to the Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), University of Lisbon in Lisbon, Portugal to deliver a public talk regarding quantum complexity theory and cryptography on March 15, 2013. Speaker: Tomoyuki Yamakami Language: English Title: Quantum Hardcores and Quantum Public-Key Cryptosystems
Views: 30 Tomoyuki Yamakami
Public Key Cryptography - Computerphile
 
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Spies used to meet in the park to exchange code words, now things have moved on - Robert Miles explains the principle of Public/Private Key Cryptography note1: Yes, it should have been 'Obi Wan' not 'Obi One' :) note2: The string of 'garbage' text in the two examples should have been different to illustrate more clearly that there are two different systems in use. http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 399426 Computerphile
Asymmetric encryption - Simply explained
 
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How does public-key cryptography work? What is a private key and a public key? Why is asymmetric encryption different from symmetric encryption? I'll explain all of these in plain English! 🐦 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog: https://www.savjee.be 👍🏻 Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/savjee
Will Quantum Computers break encryption?
 
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How do you secure messages over the internet? How do quantum computers break it? How do you fix it? Why don't you watch the video to find out? Why does this description have so many questions? Why are you still reading? What is the meaning of life? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frameofessence Twitter: https://twitter.com/frameofessence YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/frameofessence CLARIFICATIONS: You don't actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7:04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can't be broken by quantum computers. CORRECTIONS: [2:18] Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there's a specific way to use them that's useful, which is what's shown in the video. [5:36] In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by "private key", neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the "private key" actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3447#appendix-A.1.2 ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can't get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it. Video links: Encryption and HUGE numbers - Numberphile https://youtu.be/M7kEpw1tn50 The No Cloning Theorem - minutephysics https://youtu.be/owPC60Ue0BE Quantum Entanglement & Spooky Action at a Distance - Veritasium https://youtu.be/ZuvK-od647c Sources: Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists http://books.google.ca/books/about/Quantum_Computing_for_Computer_Scientist.html?id=eTT0FsHA5DAC Random person talking about Quantum MITM attacks http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/2719/is-quantum-key-distribution-safe-against-mitm-attacks-too The Ekert Protocol (i.e. E91) http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~nilic/Nina's-article.pdf Annealing vs. Universal Quantum Computers https://medium.com/quantum-bits/what-s-the-difference-between-quantum-annealing-and-universal-gate-quantum-computers-c5e5099175a1 Images, Documents, and Screenshots: Post-Quantum Cryptography initiatives http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/post-quantum-crypto/cfp-announce-dec2016.html http://pqcrypto.eu.org/docs/initial-recommendations.pdf Internet map (Carna Botnet) http://census2012.sourceforge.net/ Quantum network maps https://www.slideshare.net/ADVAOpticalNetworking/how-to-quantumsecure-optical-networks http://www.secoqc.net/html/press/pressmedia.html IBM Quantum http://research.ibm.com/ibm-q/ Music: YouTube audio library: Blue Skies Incompetech: Jay Jay Pamgaea The House of Leaves Premium Beat: Cutting Edge Technology Second Time Around Swoosh 1 sound effect came from here: http://soundbible.com/682-Swoosh-1.html ...and is under this license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/sampling+/1.0/
Views: 465493 Frame of Essence
Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
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Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 428075 itfreetraining
Elliptic Curve and Quantum Cryptography - CompTIA Security+ SY0-401: 6.1
 
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Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0401 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/sy0401cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - The creation and use of cryptography has also included new ways to keep our data private. In this video, you’ll learn about the use of elliptic curves to create encryption keys and how quantum cryptography can be used for spy-proof secure channels. - - - - - Download entire video course: http://professormesser.link/401adyt Get the course on MP3 audio: http://professormesser.link/401vdyt Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 22554 Professor Messer
Quantum Key Distribution security
 
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http://spirent.com Presentation on how to use Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) to set up a secrete key between two parties. Also a quick overview of the protocol BB84. Sometimes known as Quantum cryptography.
Views: 7391 alantalkstech
What is POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean?
 
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What is POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean? POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning - POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY definition - POST-QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Post-quantum cryptography refers to cryptographic algorithms (usually public-key algorithms) that are thought to be secure against an attack by a quantum computer. This is not true for the most popular public-key algorithms, which can be efficiently broken by a sufficiently large quantum computer. The problem with the currently popular algorithms is that their security relies on one of three hard mathematical problems: the integer factorization problem, the discrete logarithm problem or the elliptic-curve discrete logarithm problem. All of these problems can be easily solved on a sufficiently powerful quantum computer running Shor's algorithm. Even though current, publicly known, experimental quantum computers are too small to attack any real cryptographic algorithm, many cryptographers are designing new algorithms to prepare for a time when quantum computing becomes a threat. This work has gained greater attention from academics and industry through the PQCrypto conference series since 2006 and more recently by several workshops on Quantum Safe Cryptography hosted by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) and the Institute for Quantum Computing. In contrast to the threat quantum computing poses to current public-key algorithms, most current symmetric cryptographic algorithms and hash functions are considered to be relatively secure against attacks by quantum computers. While the quantum Grover's algorithm does speed up attacks against symmetric ciphers, doubling the key size can effectively block these attacks. Thus post-quantum symmetric cryptography does not need to differ significantly from current symmetric cryptography.
Views: 135 The Audiopedia
How does public key cryptography work – Gary explains
 
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How keys are distributed is vital to any encryption system. Find out how to do it with the Diffie–Hellman key exchange and using public-key cryptography. Find out more: https://goo.gl/qI6jxZ Download the AndroidAuthority App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.androidauthority.app Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=androidauthority ---------------------------------------------------- Stay connected to Android Authority: - http://www.androidauthority.com - http://google.com/+androidauthority - http://facebook.com/androidauthority/ - http://twitter.com/androidauth/ - http://instagram.com/androidauthority/ Follow the Team: Josh Vergara: https://plus.google.com/+JoshuaVergara Joe Hindy: https://plus.google.com/+JosephHindy Lanh Nguyen: https://plus.google.com/+LanhNguyenFilms Jayce Broda: https://plus.google.com/+JayceBroda Gary Sims: https://plus.google.com/+GarySims Kris Carlon: http://plus.google.com/+KrisCarlon Nirave Gondhia: http://plus.google.com/+NiraveG John Velasco: http://plus.google.com/+JohnVelasco Bailey Stein: http://plus.google.com/+BaileyStein1
Views: 37619 Android Authority
Labcast #4: Quantum Key Distribution
 
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Toshiba is one of the world leaders in Quantum Cryptography and has been able to demonstrate the highest sustained bit rate for secure data communications. Toshibas new technique has sustained data rates of over 1megabit/sec, allowing for the first time the secure transmission of larger files such as audio and video. This episode contains an introduction to Toshibas research into Quantum Key Distribution and Quantum Cryptography. Dr Andrew Shields from the Toshiba Cambridge Research Lab, give's an introduction to the world of codes and ciphers by visiting historic Bletchley Park to look at codes of the past such as the Enigma and Lorentz Codes. The video also introduces Toshibas research in the field, with a demonstration of Quantum Encryption.
Views: 3072 leadinginnovation
Quantum Optics – Quantum cryptography the BB84 QKD scheme
 
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One-photon based quantum technologies In this lesson, you will discover two quantum technologies based on one photon sources. Quantum technologies allow one to achieve a goal in a way qualitatively different from a classical technology aiming at the same goal. For instance, quantum cryptography is immune to progress in computers power, while many classical cryptography methods can in principle be broken when we have more powerful computers. Similarly, quantum random number generators yield true random numbers, while classical random number generators only produce pseudo-random numbers, which might be guessed by somebody else than the user. This lesson is also an opportunity to learn two important concepts in quantum information: (i) qubits based on photon polarization; (ii) the celebrated no-cloning theorem, at the root of the security of quantum cryptography. Learning Objectives • Apply your knowledge about the behavior of a single photon on a beam splitter to quantum random number generators. • Understand the no-cloning theorem • Understand and remember the properties of q qubit This course gives you access to basic tools and concepts to understand research articles and books on modern quantum optics. You will learn about quantization of light, formalism to describe quantum states of light without any classical analogue, and observables allowing one to demonstrate typical quantum properties of these states. These tools will be applied to the emblematic case of a one-photon wave packet, which behaves both as a particle and a wave. Wave-particle duality is a great quantum mystery in the words of Richard Feynman. You will be able to fully appreciate real experiments demonstrating wave-particle duality for a single photon, and applications to quantum technologies based on single photon sources, which are now commercially available. The tools presented in this course will be widely used in our second quantum optics course, which will present more advanced topics such as entanglement, interaction of quantized light with matter, squeezed light, etc... So if you have a good knowledge in basic quantum mechanics and classical electromagnetism, but always wanted to know: • how to go from classical electromagnetism to quantized radiation, • how the concept of photon emerges, • how a unified formalism is able to describe apparently contradictory behaviors observed in quantum optics labs, • how creative physicists and engineers have invented totally new technologies based on quantum properties of light, then this course is for you. Subscribe at: https://www.coursera.org
Views: 2940 intrigano
Post-Quantum Key Exchange for the TLS Protocol from the Ring Learning with Errors Problem
 
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Post-Quantum Key Exchange for the TLS Protocol from the Ring Learning with Errors Problem Douglas Stebila Presented at the 2015 IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy May 18--20, 2015 San Jose, CA http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2015/ ABSTRACT Lattice-based cryptographic primitives are believed to offer resilience against attacks by quantum computers. We demonstrate the practicality of post-quantum key exchange by constructing cipher suites for the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol that provide key exchange based on the ring learning with errors (R-LWE) problem, we accompany these cipher suites with a rigorous proof of security. Our approach ties lattice-based key exchange together with traditional authentication using RSA or elliptic curve digital signatures: the post-quantum key exchange provides forward secrecy against future quantum attackers, while authentication can be provided using RSA keys that are issued by today's commercial certificate authorities, smoothing the path to adoption. Our cryptographically secure implementation, aimed at the 128-bit security level, reveals that the performance price when switching from non-quantum-safe key exchange is not too high. With our R-LWE cipher suites integrated into the Open SSL library and using the Apache web server on a 2-core desktop computer, we could serve 506 RLWE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 HTTPS connections per second for a 10 KiB payload. Compared to elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman, this means an 8 KiB increased handshake size and a reduction in throughput of only 21%. This demonstrates that provably secure post-quantum key-exchange can already be considered practical.
Vlad Dragoi - Cryptanalysis of the McEliece Public Key Cryptosystem Based on Polar Codes
 
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Title: Cryptanalysis of the McEliece Public Key Cryptosystem Based on Polar Codes Authors: Magali Bardet, Julia Chaulet, Vlad Dragoi, Ayoub Otmani, and Jean-Pierre Tillich 7th International Conference on Post-Quantum Cryptography PQCrypto 2016 https://pqcrypto2016.jp/program/ Proceedings http://www.springer.com/jp/book/9783319293592
Views: 321 PQCrypto 2016
26C3: How you can build an eavesdropper for a quantum cryptosystem 1/6
 
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Clip 1/6 Speakers: Qin Liu ,Sebastien Sauge This presentation will show the first experimental implementation of an eavesdropper for quantum cryptosystem. Although quantum cryptography has been proven unconditionally secure, by exploiting physical imperfections (detector vulnerability) we have successfully built an intercept-resend attack and demonstrated eavesdropping under realistic conditions on an installed quantum key distribution line. The actual eavesdropping hardware we have built will be shown during the conference. For more information go to: http://events.ccc.de/congress/2009/Fahrplan/events/3576.en.html
Views: 738 Christiaan008
Public Key Cryptography: RSA Encryption Algorithm
 
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RSA Public Key Encryption Algorithm (cryptography). How & why it works. Introduces Euler's Theorem, Euler's Phi function, prime factorization, modular exponentiation & time complexity. Link to factoring graph: http://www.khanacademy.org/labs/explorations/time-complexity
Views: 507064 Art of the Problem
2.4.1 RSA Public Key Encryption: Video
 
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MIT 6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-042JS15 Instructor: Albert R. Meyer License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 15453 MIT OpenCourseWare
Quantum cryptography, animated
 
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This animation by the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore illustrates the process of quantum key distribution using entangled photons. The goal is for two people in different places to end up with identical keys by measuring these photons. We want these people - usually given the names Alice and Bob - to have a random sequence of 1s and 0s that they can use to scramble (and then unscramble) a message. The presence of entanglement between the photons means that any snooping will be revealed. Note: this animation has no sound. See also our video series on cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4CHL5j4XhurVKJz16Qg6qj0toMHyLh7q
34C3 -  LatticeHacks
 
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https://media.ccc.de/v/34c3-9075-latticehacks Fun with lattices in cryptography and cryptanalysis Lattices are an extremely useful mathematical tool for cryptography. This talk will explain the basics of lattices in cryptography and cryptanalysis. It’s an exciting time for public-key cryptography. With the threat of practical quantum computers looming in the next few decades, it’s high time to replace the systems that can be broken by a quantum computer with ones that remain secure even if the attacker has a quantum computer. However, this is easier said than done – there is no consensus what replacements should be chosen and how secure the systems are. NIST has just started a 5-7 year competition with the target to recommend a portfolio of post-quantum encryption and signature schemes. Considerations will be speed, bandwidth, and of course security. Several of the submissions are based on lattices. At our current level of understanding, lattice-based cryptography offers relatively small public keys for both encryption and signatures, while having good performance and reasonably sized ciphertexts and signatures. While these features are nice and make us want to know more about lattices, that world can be a scary place full of discussions of Minkowski bounds, Gaussian distributions, and orthogonalized bases. We will show how these schemes work in accessible terms. Lattices have been used in cryptography for more than thirty years, but for most of that only as a tool to attack systems, starting with knapsack systems in the early 80’s. Lattices can also be used to break conventional public-key cryptosystems such as RSA or Diffie-Hellman when they are incorrectly implemented. This talk will explain these fun attacks in concrete terms, with code you can run at home. Algorithms will be presented as Python/Sage code snippets and will already be online before the talk at https://latticehacks.cr.yp.to. This is a joint presentation by Daniel J. Bernstein, Nadia Heninger, and Tanja Lange, surveying work by many people. djb Tanja Lange Nadia Heninger https://fahrplan.events.ccc.de/congress/2017/Fahrplan/events/9075.html
Views: 2380 media.ccc.de
CERIAS Security: Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems 1/5
 
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Clip 1/5 Speaker: Jintai Ding · University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on For more information go to the Cerias website (http://bit.ly/dsFCBF)
Views: 118 Christiaan008
Quantum Computing and Impact On Public Key Encryption - Prof Alan Woodward
 
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The associated research paper is here: http://www.iidi.napier.ac.uk/c/publications/publicationid/13386510
Views: 1193 The Cyber Academy
Cryptography: The Math of the Public Private Key of RSA
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Part 1: https://youtu.be/PkpFBK3wGJc Please consider being a supporter on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt Twitter: @Patrick_JMT In this video I show mathematically for RSA encryption works by going through an example of sending an encrypted message! If you are interested in seeing how Euclid's algorithm would work, check out this video by Emily Jane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fz1vxq5ts5I A big thanks to the 'Making & Science team at Google' for sponsoring this video! Please like and share using hashtag #sciencegoals
Views: 35630 patrickJMT
CERIAS Security: Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems 5/5
 
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Clip 5/5 Speaker: Jintai Ding · University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on For more information go to the Cerias website (http://bit.ly/dsFCBF)
Views: 65 Christiaan008
Introduction to the Post-Quantum Supersingular Isogeny Diffie-Hellman Protocol
 
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A talk given at the University of Waterloo on July 12th, 2016. The intended audience was mathematics students without necessarily any prior background in cryptography or elliptic curves. Apologies for the poor audio quality. Use subtitles if you can't hear.
Views: 1793 David Urbanik
What is KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM? What does KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM mean?
 
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What is KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM? What does KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM mean? KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM meaning - KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM definition - KNAPSACK CRYPTOSYSTEM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Knapsack Cryptosystems are cryptosystems which security is based on the hardness of solving the knapsack problem. While such systems have been existing for quite a long time, they remain quite unpopular because a lot of such systems have been broken. However that type of cryptosystem is a good candidate for post-quantum cryptography The most famous knapsack cryptosystem is the Merkle-Hellman Public Key Cryptosystem, one of the first public key cryptosystem, published the same year as the RSA cryptosystem. However this system has been broken by several attacks : one from Shamir, one by Adleman, and the low density attack. However, there exist modern knapsack cryptosystems that are considered secure so far: among them is Nasako-Murakami 2006. What is interesting with those systems is that the Knapsack problem, in the settings where no attack were found, is believed to be difficult to solve even by a quantum computer. This is not the case for systems as RSA relying on the problem of factoring big integers, a problem that is solved in linear time by Shor's quantum algorithm.
Views: 348 The Audiopedia
CERIAS Security: Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems 2/5
 
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Clip 2/5 Speaker: Jintai Ding · University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on For more information go to the Cerias website (http://bit.ly/dsFCBF)
Views: 30 Christiaan008
Introduction to quantum cryptography - Vadim Makarov
 
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I introduce the basic principles of quantum cryptography, and discuss today's status of its technology, with examples of optical schemes and components. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is required :). This first lecture is about the basics of quantum cryptography. Lectures 2 and 3 cover quantum hacking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2r7B8Zpxmcw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sc_cJiLFQZ0 Presentation slides of the entire lecture course can be downloaded at: Power Point (95 MiB, with videos and animations) - http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140801-IQC-short-course.pptx PDF (14.8 MiB, static images only) - http://www.vad1.com/lab/presentations/Makarov-20140801-IQC-short-course.pdf Vadim Makarov is a research assistant professor at the Institute for Quantum Computing, heading the Quantum hacking lab - http://www.vad1.com/lab/ This course was part of a lecture series hosted by CryptoWorks21 in August 2014 in Waterloo, Canada. Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-quantum-computing/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
CERIAS Security: Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems 4/5
 
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Clip 4/5 Speaker: Jintai Ding · University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on For more information go to the Cerias website (http://bit.ly/dsFCBF)
Views: 62 Christiaan008
Introduction to Lattice Based Cryptography
 
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This short video introduces the concept of a lattice, why they are being considered as the basis for the next generation of public key cryptography, and a short walk through of a specific encryption algorithm. For a very thorough paper designed to be readable for undergraduates I highly recommend https://eprint.iacr.org/2015/938.pdf. *One technical note: At 1:30 I claim that lattices are composed only of integers. This is not true. Some lattices only contain integers, but in general any rational number will do.
Views: 5354 Matthew Dozer
Daniele Micciancio - Lattice-based public-key cryptography
 
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Daniele Micciancio of the University of California, San Diego presented an invited talk on lattice-based public key cryptography at the 2014 PQCrypto summer school in October, 2014. PQCrypto Summer School: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/summer-school/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
Nicolas Sendrier - Code-based public-key cryptography
 
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Nicolas Sendrier of the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation presented an invited talk on code-based public-key cryptography at the 2014 PQCrypto summer school in October, 2014. PQCrypto Summer School: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/summer-school/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
2005-02-23 CERIAS - Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems
 
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Recorded: 02/23/2005 CERIAS Security Seminar at Purdue University Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems Jintai Ding, University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on Jintai Ding is currently an associate professor in Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cincinnati. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Yale in 1995. He received the Zhong Jia Qing prize from the Chinese Mathematical Society in 1990 and the Sloan Dissertation Fellowship in 1994-1995. Before he moved to Cincinnati in 1998, he worked as a lecturer at the Research Institute of Mathematical Sciences of Kyoto University in Japan for three years. His early works are in quantum groups and in the last few years, his main interest is in the area of the multivariable public key cryptosystems. (Visit: www.cerias.purude.edu)
Views: 162 ceriaspurdue
Jintai Ding - ZHFE, a New Multivariate Public Key Encryption Scheme
 
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Jintai Ding of the University of Cincinnati and the Chinese Academy of Sciences presented a talk titled: ZHFE, a new multivariate public key encryption scheme at the 2014 PQCrypto conference in October, 2014. Abstract: In this paper we propose a new multivariate public key encryption scheme named ZHFE. The public key is constructed using as core map two high rank HFE polynomials. The inversion of the public key is performed using a low degree polynomial of Hamming weight three. This low degree polynomial is obtained from the two high rank HFE polynomials, by means of a special reduction method that uses HFE polynomials. We show that ZHFE is relatively efficient and the it is secure against the main attacks that have threatened the security of HFE. We also propose parameters for a practical implementation of ZHFE. PQCrypto 2014 Book: http://www.springer.com/computer/security+and+cryptology/book/978-3-319-11658-7 Workshop: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
Post Quantum Cryptography - Cryptographic Challenge
 
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Post Quantum Cryptography - Cryptographic Challenge Crypto Challenge Homepage http://automatski.com/crypto
CERIAS Security: Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems 3/5
 
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Clip 3/5 Speaker: Jintai Ding · University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on For more information go to the Cerias website (http://bit.ly/dsFCBF)
Views: 32 Christiaan008
What is QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION mean?
 
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What is QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION mean? QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION meaning - QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION definition - QUANTUM KEY DISTRIBUTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Quantum key distribution (QKD) uses quantum mechanics to guarantee secure communication. It enables two parties to produce a shared random secret key known only to them, which can then be used to encrypt and decrypt messages. It is often incorrectly called quantum cryptography, as it is the best-known example of a quantum cryptographic task. An important and unique property of quantum key distribution is the ability of the two communicating users to detect the presence of any third party trying to gain knowledge of the key. This results from a fundamental aspect of quantum mechanics: the process of measuring a quantum system in general disturbs the system. A third party trying to eavesdrop on the key must in some way measure it, thus introducing detectable anomalies. By using quantum superpositions or quantum entanglement and transmitting information in quantum states, a communication system can be implemented that detects eavesdropping. If the level of eavesdropping is below a certain threshold, a key can be produced that is guaranteed to be secure (i.e. the eavesdropper has no information about it), otherwise no secure key is possible and communication is aborted. The security of encryption that uses quantum key distribution relies on the foundations of quantum mechanics, in contrast to traditional public key cryptography, which relies on the computational difficulty of certain mathematical functions, and cannot provide any mathematical proof as to the actual complexity of reversing the one-way functions used. QKD has provable security based on information theory, and forward secrecy. Quantum key distribution is only used to produce and distribute a key, not to transmit any message data. This key can then be used with any chosen encryption algorithm to encrypt (and decrypt) a message, which can then be transmitted over a standard communication channel. The algorithm most commonly associated with QKD is the one-time pad, as it is provably secure when used with a secret, random key. In real-world situations, it is often also used with encryption using symmetric key algorithms like the Advanced Encryption Standard algorithm.
Views: 91 The Audiopedia
AppSec EU 2017 An Introduction To Quantum Safe Cryptography by Liz O'Sullivan
 
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Quantum computing has captured the imagination of researchers and quantum algorithms have been published that show, in principle, an exponential speed up in integer factorisation. As much of our modern day public key cryptography, such as RSA, ECC and DSA is based on the hardness of such problems, a machine that implements quantum factoring at scale threatens much of our current IT security. In 2015 the US National Security Agency announced that their "Suite B" cryptographic algorithms used to protect federal systems is no longer fit for purpose and a competition to replace these with new quantum-safe algorithms is underway. This is a massive disruption to the data security marketplace. The SAFEcrypto project: Secure Architectures of Future Emerging Cryptography is funded under the EU H2020 programme. SAFEcrypto will provide a new generation of practical, robust and physically secure post-quantum cryptographic solutions that ensure long-term security for future IT systems. - Managed by the official OWASP Media Project https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_Media_Project
Views: 231 OWASP
Information Security—Before & After Public-Key Cryptography
 
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[Recorded Jan 26, 2005] Whitfield Diffie, a key figure in the discovery of public-key cryptography, traces the growth of information security through the 20th century and into the 21st. In the 1970s, the world of information security was transformed by public-key cryptography, the radical revision of cryptographic thinking that allowed people with no prior contact to communicate securely. "Public key" solved security problems born of the revolution in information technology that characterized the 20th century and made Internet commerce possible. Security problems rarely stay solved, however. Continuing growth in computing, networking, and wireless applications have given rise to new security problems that are already confronting us.
Views: 104638 Computer History Museum
symmetric key cryptography
 
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https://8gwifi.org/CipherFunctions.jsp Reference book: http://leanpub.com/crypto Cryptographic Algorithms generally fall into one of two different categories, or are a combination of both. Symmetric Fast Only provide confidentiality Examples: DES, AES, Blowfish, RC4, RC5 Asymmetric Large mathematical operations make it slower than symmetric algorithms No need for out of band key distribution (public keys are public!) Scales better since only a single key pair needed per individual Can provide authentication and nonrepudiation Examples: RSA, El Gamal, ECC, Diffie-Hellman problem with symmetric key cryptography DES (Data Encryption Standard) 64 bit key that is effectively 56 bits in strength Actual algorithm is called DEA (Data Encryption Algorithm) DES Modes Electronic Code Book Cipher Block Chaining (most commonly used for general purpose encryption) Cipher Feedback Output Feedback Counter Mode (used in IPSec) 3DES 112-bit effective key length Uses either 2 or 3 different smaller keys in one of several modes Modes EEE2/3 EDE2/3 AES NIST replaced DES in 1997 with this Uses the Rijndael algorithm Supports key/block sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits Uses 10/12/14 rounds as block size increases IDEA (International Data Encryption Algorithm) Operates on 64 bit blocks in 8 rounds with 128 bit key Considered stronger than DES and is used in PGP Blowfish 64 bit block cipher with up to 448 bit key and 16 rounds Designed by Bruce Schneier RC4 Stream cipher with variable key size created by Ron Rivest RC5 Another Rivest cipher Block cipher with 32/64/128 bit blocks and keys up to 2048 bits RC6 Beefier version of RC5 submitted as AES candidate CAST 64 bit block cipher with keys between 40-128 bits with 12-16 rounds depending on key length CAST-256 used 128-bit blocks and keys from 128-256 bits using 48 rounds SAFER (Secure and Fast Encryption Routine) Set of patent-free algorithms in 64 and 128 bit block variants Variation used in Bluetooth Twofish Adapted version of Blowfish with 128 bit blocks, 128-256 bit keys and 16 rounds AES Finalist Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel symmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography tutorial symmetric key cryptography example symmetric key cryptography vs asymmetric key cryptography symmetric and asymmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie symmetrische und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel
Views: 38296 Zariga Tongy
Lattice-Based Cryptography
 
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Most modern cryptography, and public-key crypto in particular, is based on mathematical problems that are conjectured to be infeasible (e.g., factoring large integers). Unfortunately, standard public-key techniques are often too inefficient to be employed in many environments; moreover, all commonly used schemes can in principle be broken by quantum computers. This talk will review my recent work on developing new mathematical foundations for cryptography, using geometric objects called lattices. Compared to more conventional proposals, lattice-based schemes offer a host of potential advantages: they are simple and highly parallelizable, they can be proved secure under mild worst-case hardness assumptions, and they remain unbroken by quantum algorithms. Due to the entirely different underlying mathematics, however, realizing even the most basic cryptographic notions has been a major challenge. Surprisingly, I will show that lattice-based schemes are also remarkably flexible and expressive, and that many important cryptographic goals can be achieved --- sometimes even more simply and efficiently than with conventional approaches. Some of our schemes provide interesting twists on old and cherished cryptographic notions, while others introduce entirely new concepts altogether.
Views: 2401 Microsoft Research
Quantum Security Is Expensive Bullshit
 
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In the very worst case, you only need a single phone or physical key exchange and the encryption can never be attacked (just XORing). Quantum computers are not likely to be possible, given they are based on the Schrodinger's cat fallacy (QM just gives expectations), rejecting Bayesian probability, positing an extremist view of wavefunction collapse and they can't be scaled for error correction (see Gil Kalai). However, quantum communication is bullshit for the reasons that it's extremely expensive, has no means to be routed or authenticated and the existing Internet works perfectly fine with existing cryptographic and authentication methods. "For public key encryption, such as that used for online communications and financial transactions, possible post-quantum alternatives include lattice-based, hash-based, and multivariate cryptographic algorithms as well as those that update today's Diffie-Hellman algorithm with supersingular elliptic curves. Google is already experimenting with some of these, Curran said. 'Google is working with the Lattice-based public-key New Hope algorithm,' he said. 'They are deploying it in Chrome where a small fraction of connections between desktop Chrome and Google's servers will use a post-quantum key-exchange algorithm. By adding a post-quantum algorithm on top of the existing one, they are able to experiment without affecting user security.'" This whole industry is a complete scam, which is costing companies tons of money to pointless retool their security. These guys should have kept their day jobs doing pen testing with Kali boxes.
HAR 2009: How we eavesdropped 100% of a quantum cryptographic key 5/6
 
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Clip 5/6 Speakers: Ilja Gerhardt, Vadim Makarov Quantum cryptography, as being based on the laws of physics, was claimed to be much more secure than all classical cryptography schemes. (Un)fortunately physical hardware is not beyond of an evil control: We present a successful attack of an existing quantum key distribution system exploiting a photon detector vulnerability which is probably present in all existing devices. Without Alice and Bob losing their faith in their secure communication, we recorded 100% of the supposedly secret key. The actual eavesdropping hardware we have built will be shown during the conference. A brief intro into quantum cryptography will be given at the beginning of the talk. Then, Vadim Makarov will explain the above attack. At the end of the talk, Ilja Gerhardt will (hopefully) present another application of the discovered detector vulnerability, which shall remain a surprise :) For more information go to: https://har2009.org/program/events/168.en.html
Views: 945 Christiaan008
CSE571-11-10B: Other Public-Key Cryptosystems (Part 2 of 2)
 
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Second part of Audio/Video Recording of Professor Raj Jain's class lecture on Other Public-Key Cryptosystems. It covers Diffie-Hellman Key Agreement, Man-in-Middle Attack on Diffie-Hellman, ElGamal Cryptography, Elliptic Curve Cryptography, Elliptic Curves over Real Numbers, Finite Elliptic Curves, Finite Elliptic Curve Example, ECC Diffie-Hellman, ECC Encryption/Decryption, ECC Security, PRNG based on Asymmetric Ciphers, PRNG based on RSA, PRNG based on ECC
Views: 1323 Raj Jain
Public Key Schemes - Stacey Jeffery - QCSYS 2011
 
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IQC Masters student Stacey Jeffery lectures on the concepts and applications of public key schemes.
Elliptic Curve Cryptography Overview
 
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John Wagnon discusses the basics and benefits of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in this episode of Lightboard Lessons. Check out this article on DevCentral that explains ECC encryption in more detail: https://devcentral.f5.com/articles/real-cryptography-has-curves-making-the-case-for-ecc-20832
Views: 139104 F5 DevCentral
quantum cryptography
 
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Introduction to the Quantum Cryptography lab
Views: 4691 Paul Francis
What is Encryption? Public Key Encryption? Explained in Detail
 
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Namaskaar Dosto, is video mein maine aapko encryption ke baare mein bataya hai, aap sabhi ne computer aur internet use karte time Encryption aur decryption ke baare mein jarur suna hoga, usme aapko SSL encrytpion TSL Encryption, Public Key encryption, private key encryption wagereh ke baare mein bhi suna hoga, aur abhi recently whatsapp ne bhi end to end encryption launch kiya hai, toh aise mein hamare man mein bahut se sawaal hai ki aakhir yeh encryption hota kya hai? Encryption hum hamari email pe bhi use karte hai, aur hum online banking karte time bhi encryption ka use karte hai. Mujhe umeed hai ki yeh video dekhne ke baad aap encryption aur decryption ke baare mein sab kuch jaan jayenge, aur saath hi saath public key encryption ke baare mein bhi samajh jayenge. aur aap aaraam se whatsapp ke encryption feature ko bhi use kar payenge. Win Galaxy S7, S7 Edge Here: http://bit.ly/TheMegaGiveaway Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1Wfsvt4 Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TechnicalGuruji Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/technicalguruji Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/technicalguruji Instagram: http://instagram.com/technicalguruji Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+TechnicalGuruji About : Technical Guruji is a YouTube Channel, where you will find technological videos in Hindi, New Video is Posted Everyday :)
Views: 162360 Technical Guruji
Secret Key Exchange (Diffie-Hellman) - Computerphile
 
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How do we exchange a secret key in the clear? Spoiler: We don't - Dr Mike Pound shows us exactly what happens. Mathematics bit: https://youtu.be/Yjrfm_oRO0w Computing Limit: https://youtu.be/jv2H9fp9dT8 https://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: https://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 159979 Computerphile
The Internet: Encryption & Public Keys
 
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Mia Epner, who works on security for a US national intelligence agency, explains how cryptography allows for the secure transfer of data online. This educational video explains 256 bit encryption, public and private keys, SSL & TLS and HTTPS. Learn more at http://code.org/ Help us translate into your language: http://code.org/translate/videos Stay in touch with us! • on Twitter https://twitter.com/codeorg • on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Code.org • on Instagram https://instagram.com/codeorg • on Tumblr https://blog.code.org • on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/code... • on Google+ https://google.com/+codeorg Help us caption & translate this video! https://amara.org/v/HGaS/
Views: 185973 Code.org