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HTML BASICS - CS50 on Twitch, EP. 26
 
03:21:55
Join CS50's Colton Ogden and Tom Ballatore for the beginning of an epic journey into web development. In this stream, we examine the very foundation of web programming with HTML, the "skeleton" of the web, which underlies the structure of all web pages, even this one! Tune in live on twitch.tv/cs50tv and be a part of the live chat every week. This is CS50 on Twitch.
Views: 1659 CS50
ATP & Respiration: Crash Course Biology #7
 
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In which Hank does some push ups for science and describes the "economy" of cellular respiration and the various processes whereby our bodies create energy in the form of ATP. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Special thanks go to Stafford Fitness (www.staffordfitness.net) for allowing us to shoot the gym scenes in their facilities. This video uses sounds from Freesound.org, a list of which can be found, along with the CITATIONS for this episode, in the Google Document here: http://dft.ba/-25Ad Table of Contents: 1) Cellular Respiration 01:00 2) Adenosine Triphosphate 01:29 3) Glycolysis 4:13 A) Pyruvate Molecules 5:00 B) Anaerobic Respiration/Fermentation 5:33 C) Aerobic Respiration 6:45 4) Krebs Cycle 7:06 A) Acetyl COA 7:38 B) Oxaloacetic Acid 8:21 C) Biolography: Hans Krebs 8:37 D) NAD/FAD 9:48 5) Electron Transport Chain 10:55 6) Check the Math 12:33 TAGS: crashcourse, biology, science, chemistry, energy, atp, adenosine triphosphate, cellular respiration, glucose, adp, hydrolysis, glycolysis, krebs cycle, electron transport chain, fermentation, lactic acid, enzyme, hans krebs, citric acid, ATP synthase Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 6586248 CrashCourse
Beyond Boundaries 2018: Lightning Talks
 
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The third annual Yale STEAM Symposium began with presentations by undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral associates on Digital Humanities/STEAM projects. “Science Stories: Using IIIF and Wikidata to Create a Linked-Data Web Application” Kenneth Seals-Nutt, Undergraduate, Computer Science Kat Thornton, CLIR Postdoctoral Associate, Computer Science and Digital Preservation “Co-Education at Yale: Through the Eyes of a Pioneer” Jasper Feinberg, Undergraduate, Mechanical Engineering “Abroad but now Accessible: VR Educational Tours” Amy Giuliano, MA student, Religion and the Visual Arts, Institute of Sacred Music “The Media Concept” Anna Shechtman, PhD student, English Literature and Film & Media Studies Zachary Kitt, MA student, Global Affairs “The Relationship between the Style and Impact of Judicial Opinions” Nina Varsava, Yale Law student and Stanford PhD student, Modern Thought & Literature “Digital Humanity” Jessica Ambrosio, Undergraduate, Computer Science Maria Gargiulo, Undergraduate, Statistics & Data Science and Spanish
Views: 758 YaleUniversity
Lecture - 21 PERL - Part I
 
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Lecture Series on Internet Tecnologies by Prof. I. Sengupta, Department of Computer Science Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 197868 nptelhrd
Prototype Ontology Builder For i2b2
 
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This is prototype ontology builder for i2b2. It communicates with the bioportal to generate snomed and icd10 ontologies. http://bru2.brisskit.le.ac.uk:8080/OntologyBuilder/create.jsp
Saving the Web: Ethics & Challenges of Preserving the Internet (morning)
 
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Preserving the contents of the internet is an increasingly vital activity. The web today is an ubiquitous global information system, and yet significant amounts of its contents disappear daily. The average web page remains online for barely 100 days. This symposium brings together experts in this field to discuss the major issues in the debate around this topic, the future potential of web archives to researchers and scholars, and the challenges in web archiving that face libraries, governments, institutions and individuals. (Morning Session). Speaker Biography: Dame Wendy Hall is professor of computer science at the University of Southampton, England, and holder of the 2016 Kluge Chair in Technology and Society. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7635
Views: 504 LibraryOfCongress
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 202519 Shari Wing