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Lora Hooper (UT Southwestern) 2: Mammalian gut microbiota: Maintaining symbiosis in the intestine
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/gut-microbiota/#part-2 Overview: Dr. Hooper studies how the gut microbiota changes during illness or disease and how it influences our ability to fight infections. In part 2, Hooper explains how a healthy gut microbes induce a host protein called RegIIIγ which helps to protect the host from infection by pathogenic gram-positive bacteria. Detailed description: In this lecture, Dr. Hooper introduces us to the fascinating world of human microbiota; the microorganisms that live within our bodies. Although we may think that most bacteria are harmful, Hooper provides ample evidence that symbiotic gut microbes are important to good human health. Her lab is interested in understanding how the microbiota changes during illness or disease and how it influences our ability to fight infections. Using germ-free mice, they were able to demonstrate that a healthy microbiota can shape development of the host immune system and provide protection against dangerous infections like salmonella. In the second part of her talk, Hooper explains how the balance of organisms in the microbiota is maintained. By comparing DNA microarray data from normal mice and germ-free mice, Hooper’s lab was able to look for genes induced by the microbiota. They identified RegIIIγ, an important protein involved in the protection against pathogenic bacteria. They showed that RegIIIγ forms pore complexes in the membranes of gram-positive bacteria and kills them. In mice and humans, the intestinal epithelium is coated with a layer of mucus. Typically, there is a gap between gut bacteria, which are found in the outer part of the mucus layer, and the epithelial cells. Hooper’s lab showed that RegIIIγ helps to maintain this gap by preventing gram-positive bacteria from colonizing the intestinal epithelial surface. This, in turn, prevents infection of the host. Speaker Biography: Although she always was interested in science, Lora Hooper’s love for biology started after taking an introductory class at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN where she was an undergraduate. Hooper continued her graduate education in the Molecular Cell Biology and Biochemistry Program at Washington University in St. Louis where she joined Dr. Jacques Baenziger's lab. For postdoctoral training, she stayed at Washington University, in the lab of Jeffrey Gordon, where she began her studies of the interaction between gut bacteria and host cells and discovered that bacteria have the capacity to modify carbohydrates important for cell signaling. Currently, Hooper is a Professor at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. She has established one of the handful of mouse facilities that have the capacity to breed germ-free mice. Using these mice, her lab explores the symbiotic relationship between a host and its microbiota with the aim of providing insight into human health. Hooper was a recipient of the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Awards in 2013 and in 2015 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 3235 iBiology
Eczema, Immunity and the Skin Microbiome - Heidi Kong
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Tim Ferriss on Ketosis, Microbiome, Lyme Disease, and Biomarkers
 
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews 3-time New York Times best-selling author Tim Ferriss. They discuss what Tim's leading blood biomarkers are that he focuses on optimizing, the importance of tracking glucose along with ketones to make sure you don't confuse non-nutritional ketosis with the real deal, Tim's personal experience beating lyme disease and his insights on recovery, the origin and cause of "lyme hysteria", and how some of the symptoms of what is described as "chronic lyme disease" may actually be caused by a disrupted gut microbiome from uninterrupted, long-term use of antibiotics, what the "minimum effective dose" is when it comes to working out, and a little bit about Tim's workout routine and much much more. You can check out Tim's blog here: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/ You can get in touch with him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram here: http://www.twitter.com/tferriss http://www.facebook.com/timferriss http://www.instagram.com/timferriss You can subscribe to his podcast by going here https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tim-ferriss-show/id863897795?mt=2 (note: Like Tim, I am also on iTunes!) You can buy one of his many books here: http://www.amazon.com/Timothy-Ferriss/e/B001ILKBW2/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1439325281&sr=8-1&tracking_id=foun06-20 ... or his TV show here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/tv-season/the-tim-ferriss-experiment/id984734983 -------------------------------------------------------- Join my weekly newsletter (please!): http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=nutrigenomics Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foundmyfitness Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 271713 FoundMyFitness
Antagonism toward the intestinal microbiota and its effect on Vibrio cholerae virulence
 
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ARTICLE Title: Antagonism toward the intestinal microbiota and its effect on Vibrio cholerae virulence. Authors: Wenjing Zhao, Florence Caro, William Robins, John J. Mekalanos. Published in SCIENCE (January 12, 2018): http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6372/210.long VIDEO ABSTRACT Production Company: In Motion Science (IMS) http://www.inmotionscience.com / 2018
Views: 303 In Motion Science
Skin microbiota | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_flora 00:01:23 1 Species variety 00:01:33 1.1 Bacteria 00:03:46 1.2 Fungal 00:05:34 1.2.1 Umbilical microbiome 00:10:14 2 Relationship to host 00:12:53 3 Skin defenses 00:13:03 3.1 Antimicrobial peptides 00:14:04 3.2 Acidity 00:15:12 3.3 Immune system 00:15:57 4 Skin diseases 00:16:30 4.1 Acne vulgaris 00:18:02 4.2 Atopic Dermatitis 00:19:33 4.3 Psoriasis vulgaris 00:20:53 4.4 Rosacea 00:22:21 5 Clinical 00:22:31 5.1 Infected devices 00:22:49 6 Hygiene 00:23:26 6.1 Contagion 00:23:54 6.2 Removal 00:25:55 6.3 Damaged skin 00:27:24 7 Comparison with other flora 00:27:57 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7610450909999134 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The term skin flora (also commonly referred to as skin microbiota) refers to the microorganisms which reside on the skin, typically human skin. Many of them are bacteria of which there are around 1000 species upon human skin from nineteen phyla. Most are found in the superficial layers of the epidermis and the upper parts of hair follicles. Skin flora is usually non-pathogenic, and either commensal (are not harmful to their host) or mutualistic (offer a benefit). The benefits bacteria can offer include preventing transient pathogenic organisms from colonizing the skin surface, either by competing for nutrients, secreting chemicals against them, or stimulating the skin's immune system. However, resident microbes can cause skin diseases and enter the blood system, creating life-threatening diseases, particularly in immunosuppressed people.A major non-human skin flora is Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a chytrid and non-hyphal zoosporic fungus that causes chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease thought to be responsible for the decline in amphibian populations.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
The Microbiome & Skin Health
 
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We’ve heard a lot about how the microbiome can affect gut health, but what about skin? Learn more about the microbiome and hear some of the creative ways cosmetic companies are using these microscopic creatures to help benefit our skin. Thank yous: *Cosmetics & Toiletries - For providing all the awesome content *Rachel Grabenhofer - For creating the article that most of this content is based on *FISHTITCH - Those finger puppets --TOTES ADORBES, right?!?! I got them from Brandy. You can find them here: https://www.facebook.com/Fishtitch Learn more about the microbiome from the folks at COSMETICS & TOILETRIES: *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/biology/Connecting-the-Dots-Between-Microbes-367821901.html *http://www.gcimagazine.com/business/rd/technology/174764911.html *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/methodsprocesses/Natural-vs-Synthetic-Antimicrobials-and-HDAC-as-an-Indicator-of-Microflora-Health-300982911.html *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/methodsprocesses/How-Do-Cosmetic-Formulas-Impact-Skins-Microbiome-391613731.html? *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/formulating/function/preservatives/62592027.html 👋Hi! I'm Trina, AKA Ms. Beautyphile, and I'm addicted to cosmetic chemistry and beauty products :D Hey, there are worse things to be addicted too ;) Watch my channel to learn more about the science behind cosmetics! Subscribe here - http://goo.gl/3HsVY5 Have thoughts to share on the microbiome? I’d love to hear them! Share your thoughts in the comments sections below! And if you watched the video, SUBSCRIBED, and read this entire description, thank you so much for taking the time to do all that. Hugs and head noogies for you!!!! :P Hey, your science is showing! Come find me on Social Media! ***** Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/msbeautyphile ***** Mosh: https://www.mosh.us/ms-beautyphile/ ***** Blog: http://www.msbeautyphile.com ***** Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/msbeautyphile ***** Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/msbeautyphile Love learning about cosmetic chemistry? Read more about the industry here: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/groups/1856030/profile
Views: 1788 msbeautyphile
Genomics of Microbes and Microbiomes - Julie Segre (2016)
 
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May 18, 2016 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2016 More: http://www.genome.gov/CTGA2016
Live Long and Prosper: Next Generation Diagnosis of Infection
 
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Advances in DNA sequencing technology provides us with increasingly powerful tools for diagnosing infection and this talk will explore new frontiers of emerging pathogens and our ability to diagnose infections that would elude detection by conventional methods. Applications of board range PCR for diagnosing bacteria, fungal and parasitic infections will be covered, in addition to clinical next generation sequencing for deconvoluting polymicrobial samples. After viewing this talk, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the expanding definition of ‘pathogen’, and describe how modern medical therapies impact an individual's susceptibility to infection 2. List the appropriate controls that are important for interpreting sequence-based testing for infectious agents and list the ways sample selection, handling and processing impacts molecular testing 3. Describe clinical situations where molecular testing and clinical next generation sequencing is appropriate for diagnosing infection and strain typing Brad Cookson, MD, PhD Professor, Depts of Laboratory Medicine and Microbiology Head - Clinical Microbiology Division Dept of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington 03/13/19 http://depts.washington.edu/labweb/Education/ContEdu/
Views: 84 UW Video
UnP - Episode 28 - Disease
 
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We're old friends dissecting one topic at a time. People, Technology, Media - We've got it all covered. Taboo, forbidden subjects are on our chopping block and we don't pander to popular opinion. Warning - May contain mature language and sexual content. UnP talks about Viruses, Bacteria, Infections, and Plagues such as Alzheimer's (ALS), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the Black Plague. Pathology is the study of Pathogens and the Diseases they carry. The Microbiome around us creates a Symbiotic relationship with our body's natural defenses. When our own Antibodies and T-cells can't fend off bacterial or viral infections, we become sick and ill. On a large scale, Infectious diseases can spread amongst a population rapidly with and without human physical contact. The Black Plague devastated 60% of Europe's population in the past. Is it possible that a superbug is around the corner? More On This Episode:http://www.unpanderers.com/2018/06/unp028-disease-virus-bacteria-sick.html Our Website:https://www.UnPanderers.com Other Episodes:https://www.UnPanderers.com/p/episode-listing.html LIVE on Twitch - Mondays, Thursdays @ 9:00 PM Central https://www.twitch.tv/unpanderers/ Subscribe via Email: http://bit.ly/UnPEmailSub Subscribe via Android: http://bit.ly/UnPAndroidSub Subscribe via FeedBurner: http://bit.ly/UnPFeedBurner Twitter: http://bit.ly/UnPTwitter Patreon: http://bit.ly/UnPPatreon Reddit: http://bit.ly/UnPReddit Facebook: http://bit.ly/UnPFacebook LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/UnPLinkedIn Google Play Podcasts: http://bit.ly/UnPGooglePlayMusic Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/UnPiTunes Keyword Timeline 00:00:00 | quiet night, plate wolves 00:02:00 | image search, motherboard, my bed, video card, even fit 00:03:00 | ceo writes, animorphs, carrie underwood 00:04:00 | wrap someone's 00:05:00 | bench, whatever system 00:06:00 | ps exclusives, final fantasy 00:07:00 | wealthiest, olympics, amazon non 00:08:00 | olympics, over-the-air, eyes michael 00:09:00 | parkland 00:11:00 | research stuff 00:13:00 | florida, poles, barbershop, usa tattooed 00:16:00 | crazy music 00:18:00 | time whatever, heck's said, intervals, jason jason, sabbath he plays, remarkably 00:19:00 | remarkably human, starts playing, johnston 00:20:00 | intervals 00:21:00 | remarkably human, johnston, skeletons wrote 00:22:00 | satisfied, dissen 00:23:00 | diarrhea, puke 00:24:00 | puke, pornos next 00:27:00 | weird seeing, watch porn 00:28:00 | napkins, real tiny 00:29:00 | napkins, cut yourself, tissues sorry 00:30:00 | hendersons, harry, alf, skin, slowly migrate 00:31:00 | harry 00:32:00 | watching the olympics 00:33:00 | diseases, idea whatever, rabies shot, rate mortality percent 00:34:00 | rabies shot 00:37:00 | k peace, mini map 00:39:00 | form factor, trigger, needed bigger, my processor 00:40:00 | one bottleneck, k gaming, video card 00:43:00 | everyone copied, same list, conformed data, deaths per year 00:44:00 | disease spreading, two definitely, pandemic, versions plague, york city 00:45:00 | diseases 00:46:00 | well mean, staph resistant, leprosy comedy 00:47:00 | totally hate, bacteria, plague 00:48:00 | british people, good disease, million cases, one malaria, deaths 00:49:00 | deaths, going to die, diseases 00:50:00 | pandemic, aids, million people, danny pan 00:52:00 | disease, claims court 00:54:00 | moment silence moment, terrible moment, diseases, defends itself, ebola, immune system 00:55:00 | t-cells, foreign, cause things, one causes, ebola 00:56:00 | immunity cells, cell involved, dendritic, innate leukocytes 00:57:00 | malaria, immune system, immune rest, cells, foreign 00:58:00 | malaria 00:59:00 | cells, disease, skin, mona 01:00:00 | penicillin, antibiotics, bacteria, cells 01:01:00 | diseases 01:02:00 | avian, swine flu, antibiotics 01:03:00 | infection, bacteria, defends itself, skin, cells suck, antibiotic 01:04:00 | super bacteria, resistant 01:05:00 | going to die 01:06:00 | disease, york city, immune, college party, super hammered 01:07:00 | carrier, mono mono, year apart, disease, immune system, trigger 01:08:00 | rats fleas, hn 01:10:00 | disease, hn, killed somebody 01:11:00 | avian, swine flu, zika, brazil, garbage well 01:12:00 | wildfire, superbug, resistant, bacteria, antibiotics, million people 01:13:00 | brazil, watching the olympics, zika, cases, case one, florida, attributed 01:14:00 | immune, people learn, resistant, bacteria, wildfire, immunity 01:15:00 | ones stopped, res
Views: 5 The UnPanderers
Genomics of Microbes and Microbiomes - Julia Segre (2014)
 
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June 4, 2014 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2014 A lecture series covering contemporary areas in genomics and bioinformatics. More: http://www.genome.gov/COURSE2014
The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2)
 
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The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2) Air date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 8:15:00 AM Category: Conferences Runtime: 07:32:24 Description: The 2017 NIH-wide microbiome workshop will strive to cover advances that reveal the specific ways in which the microbiota influences the physiology of the host, both in a healthy and in a diseased state and how the microbiota may be manipulated, either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level, to maintain and/or improve the health of the host. The goal will be to seek input from a trans-disciplinary group of scientists to identify 1) knowledge gaps, 2) technical hurdles, 3) new approaches and 4) research opportunities that will inform the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies based on host/microbiome interactions over the next ten years. Author: NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23423
Views: 1920 nihvcast
Human microbiota | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiota 00:01:51 1 Terminology 00:02:27 2 Relative numbers 00:03:42 3 Study 00:06:26 3.1 Shotgun Sequencing 00:06:56 3.1.1 Collection of samples and DNA extraction 00:07:35 3.1.2 Preparation of the library and sequencing 00:08:04 3.1.3 Metagenome assembly 00:08:40 3.1.4 Contig binning 00:09:22 3.1.5 Analysis after the processing 00:10:13 3.2 Marker gene analysis 00:13:09 3.3 Phylogenetic Analysis 00:14:46 4 Types 00:14:55 4.1 Bacteria 00:17:23 4.2 Archaea 00:18:07 4.3 Fungi 00:18:37 4.4 Viruses 00:19:05 5 Anatomical areas 00:19:15 5.1 Skin 00:20:43 5.2 Conjunctiva 00:21:32 5.3 Gut 00:24:33 5.4 Urethra and bladder 00:25:20 5.5 Vagina 00:26:55 5.6 Placenta 00:27:16 5.7 Uterus 00:27:44 5.8 Oral cavity 00:31:11 5.9 Lung 00:32:46 5.10 Biliary tract 00:33:22 6 Disease and death 00:33:40 6.1 Cancer 00:36:25 6.2 Inflammatory bowel disease 00:36:58 6.3 Human immunodeficiency virus 00:38:08 6.4 Death 00:38:31 7 Environmental health 00:38:55 8 Migration 00:39:22 9 See also 00:39:31 10 Bibliography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9308021918324354 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The human microbiota is the aggregate of microorganisms that resides on or within any of a number of human tissues and biofluids, including the skin, mammary glands, placenta, seminal fluid, uterus, ovarian follicles, lung, saliva, oral mucosa, conjunctiva, biliary and gastrointestinal tracts. They include bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses. Though micro-animals can also live on the human body, they are typically excluded from this definition. The human microbiome refers specifically to the collective genomes of resident microorganisms.Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number. Some microorganisms that colonize humans are commensal, meaning they co-exist without harming humans; others have a mutualistic relationship with their human hosts. Conversely, some non-pathogenic microorganisms can harm human hosts via the metabolites they produce, like trimethylamine, which the human body converts to trimethylamine N-oxide via FMO3-mediated oxidation. Certain microorganisms perform tasks that are known to be useful to the human host but the role of most of them is not well understood. Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota.The Human Microbiome Project took on the project of sequencing the genome of the human microbiota, focusing particularly on the microbiota that normally inhabit the skin, mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina. It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published its initial results.
Views: 13 wikipedia tts
Lecture 23
 
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This lecture introduces the succession of microbial cells to the daughter cells.
Webinar: Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease
 
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October 15, 2009. The skin creates a barrier between the body and the environment. Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing this skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization. Dr. Segre moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments. In addition, the webinar discussed details of the Human Microbiome Project. More: http://www.genome.gov/27535715
Do Skin Probiotics Work? - CHTV 174
 
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Probiotic skin products are all the rage these days, but do they actually work? In this episode, we bring back our favorite biochemist Dr. Shayne Morris to help understand the skin microbiome, how to keep it healthy, and explain his break-through Skin Colonizer product that has been getting outstanding results with our clients. The skin microbiome affects more than how we look; it's connected to our gut, brain, and immune function as a whole; and now we have the tools and knowledge to keep it happy. Notice: Dr. Daniel Pompa is licensed by the Pastoral Medical Association (PMA). For detailed licensing & disclaimer information, visit: http://drpompa.com/pma-disclaimer Dr. Pompa has voluntarily relinquished his chiropractic license in the state of Pennsylvania in order to more effectively pursue his dream of world health.
Views: 2080 Dr. Daniel Pompa
Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Immune Response
 
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The research community has begun correlating the makeup of individual microbiomes with disorders and diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis and cancer. To accomplish this, researchers must first identify and characterize these microbial communities and understand the complex immune interactions between host and pathogen. This webinar provides you with a complete overview of the microbiome, metagenomics and host-pathogen interactions. Experimental strategies, from sample to insight, which can facilitate your microbiology and immunology research, are highlighted.
Views: 649 QIAGEN
Microbial symbiosis and immunity | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_symbiosis_and_immunity 00:01:53 1 General principles 00:02:48 2 In the gastrointestinal tract 00:04:33 2.1 Regulation of immune responses 00:06:42 2.2 Development of isolated lymphoid tissues 00:08:36 2.3 Protection against pathogens 00:09:02 2.3.1 Immunoglobulin A 00:11:21 2.3.2 Antimicrobial peptides 00:13:54 2.3.3 Fortification fucose 00:14:49 3 On the epidermis 00:15:59 4 Role in disease 00:16:35 4.1 Cancer 00:17:39 4.2 Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 00:20:02 4.3 Obesity Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7238050180124337 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= There are close and often long-term relationships between symbiotic microbes and their host's immune system. The immune system is a host defense system consisting of anatomical barriers, and physiological and cellular responses, which protect the host against harmful parasites while limiting inflammation by tolerating harmless symbionts. Humans are home to 1013 to 1014 bacteria. These bacteria can have almost any kind of relationship with the host, including mutually beneficial in a host's gut, or parasitic. Microbes can promote the development of the host's immune system in the gut and skin, and may help to prevent pathogens from invading. Some release anti-inflammatory products, protecting against parasitic gut microbes. Commensals promote the development of B cells that produce a protective antibody, Immunoglobulin A (IgA). This can neutralize pathogens and exotoxins, and promote the development of TH17 and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Microbes trigger development of isolated lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, which are sites of mucosal immune response. Microbes can prevent growth of harmful pathogens by altering pH, consuming nutrients required for pathogen survival, and secreting toxins that inhibit growth of pathogens. However, microbes have been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and cancer.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
PACCARB 11th Public Mtg, Day 2 Pt 5: PUBLIC COMMENT & Adjourn
 
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Eleventh public meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB). The January 30th-31st public meeting was dedicated to hosting domestic and international stakeholders from all One Health domains, including animal, human, and environmental health, to explore priority areas that have emerged since the original National Action Plan on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (CARB) was launched in 2015. January 30-31, 2019 Public Meeting Page: https://www.hhs.gov/ash/advisory-committees/paccarb/meetings/upcoming-meetings/january-30-2019-public-meeting/index.html -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://www.hhs.gov/web/socialmedia/po... HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html • Category o Education • License o Standard YouTube License
History of antibiotics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:03:20 1 Medical uses 00:05:24 1.1 Administration 00:07:07 1.2 Prevalence 00:07:53 2 Side-effects 00:09:33 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:10:47 3 Interactions 00:10:57 3.1 Birth control pills 00:13:13 3.2 Alcohol 00:14:42 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:16:06 4.1 Combination therapy 00:17:30 5 Classes 00:19:08 6 Production 00:20:34 7 Resistance 00:25:34 7.1 Misuse 00:31:03 8 History 00:31:47 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:34:59 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:40:52 9 Etymology 00:43:03 10 Research 00:43:12 10.1 Alternatives 00:43:59 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:45:04 10.3 Vaccines 00:46:02 10.4 Phage therapy 00:48:06 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:49:32 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8667578167481818 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic which means "opposing life", based on Greek roots, (ἀντι-) anti: "against" and (βίος-) biotic: "life", is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. There's evidence of antibiotic use since ancient times. Many civilizations used topical application of mouldy bread, with many references to its beneficial effects arising from ancient Egypt, China, Serbia, Greece and Rome. The first person to directly document the use of moulds to treat infections was John Parkinson (1567–1650). Antibiotics truly revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. Alexander Fleming (1881–1955) discovered modern day penicillin in 1928. After realizing the great potential there was in penicillin, Fleming pursued the challenge of how to market it and translate it to commercial use. With help from other biochemists, penicillin was finally available for widespread use. This was significantly beneficial during wartime. Unfortunately, it didn't take long for resistance to begin. Effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
History of antibiotics | Wikipedia audio article
 
51:10
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:02:14 1 Medical uses 00:04:14 1.1 Administration 00:05:54 1.2 Prevalence 00:06:38 2 Side-effects 00:08:15 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:09:26 3 Interactions 00:09:36 3.1 Birth control pills 00:11:48 3.2 Alcohol 00:13:12 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:14:34 4.1 Combination therapy 00:15:56 5 Classes 00:17:30 6 Production 00:18:52 7 Resistance 00:23:40 7.1 Misuse 00:28:54 8 History 00:29:38 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:32:42 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:38:23 9 Etymology 00:40:27 10 Research 00:40:36 10.1 Alternatives 00:41:21 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:42:24 10.3 Vaccines 00:43:20 10.4 Phage therapy 00:45:21 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:46:44 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7629401505100428 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic which means "opposing life", based on Greek roots, (ἀντι-) anti: "against" and (βίος-) biotic: "life", is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. However, their effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse, and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
PACCARB 11th Public Mtg, Day 2 Pt 3: PANEL 7: One Health Surveillance
 
01:17:38
Eleventh public meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB). The January 30th-31st public meeting was dedicated to hosting domestic and international stakeholders from all One Health domains, including animal, human, and environmental health, to explore priority areas that have emerged since the original National Action Plan on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (CARB) was launched in 2015. January 30-31, 2019 Public Meeting Page: https://www.hhs.gov/ash/advisory-committees/paccarb/meetings/upcoming-meetings/january-30-2019-public-meeting/index.html -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://www.hhs.gov/web/socialmedia/po... HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html • Category o Education • License o Standard YouTube License
UnP Audio Only 028 Disease Virus Bacteria Sick Infected
 
01:25:58
We're old friends dissecting one topic at a time. People, Technology, Media - We've got it all covered. Taboo, forbidden subjects are on our chopping block and we don't pander to popular opinion. Warning - May contain mature language and sexual content. UnP talks about Viruses, Bacteria, Infections, and Plagues such as Alzheimer's (ALS), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the Black Plague. Pathology is the study of Pathogens and the Diseases they carry. The Microbiome around us creates a Symbiotic relationship with our body's natural defenses. When our own Antibodies and T-cells can't fend off bacterial or viral infections, we become sick and ill. On a large scale, Infectious diseases can spread amongst a population rapidly with and without human physical contact. The Black Plague devastated 60% of Europe's population in the past. Is it possible that a superbug is around the corner? More On This Episode:http://www.unpanderers.com/2018/06/unp028-disease-virus-bacteria-sick.html Our Website:https://www.UnPanderers.com Other Episodes:https://www.UnPanderers.com/p/episode-listing.html LIVE on Twitch - Mondays, Thursdays @ 9:00 PM Central https://www.twitch.tv/unpanderers/ Subscribe via Email: http://bit.ly/UnPEmailSub Subscribe via Android: http://bit.ly/UnPAndroidSub Subscribe via FeedBurner: http://bit.ly/UnPFeedBurner Twitter: http://bit.ly/UnPTwitter Patreon: http://bit.ly/UnPPatreon Reddit: http://bit.ly/UnPReddit Facebook: http://bit.ly/UnPFacebook LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/UnPLinkedIn Google Play Podcasts: http://bit.ly/UnPGooglePlayMusic Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/UnPiTunes Keyword Timeline 00:00:00 | quiet night 00:02:00 | rock z, video card, ddr m 00:04:00 | s book 00:06:00 | kept researchers, games automatically 00:07:00 | olympics, greeks, europe, lighters i thought 00:08:00 | fervor 00:09:00 | lakeland, parkland 00:11:00 | dad's like crying 00:12:00 | florida 00:13:00 | poles, bit four, flipping north, barbershop 00:14:00 | cattle, skin 00:15:00 | domesticated look 00:16:00 | ticketmaster fees 00:17:00 | time whatever 00:18:00 | jason richardson, guys coming, sean positive, remarkably human, looking human, nick johnston 00:19:00 | richardson, jason, remarkably human, nick johnson, nick johnston 00:20:00 | jason richardson, intervals dude 00:21:00 | remarkably human, skeletons wrote, skin 00:23:00 | sometimes come, puked my 00:24:00 | bulimic 00:25:00 | weirder stuff, porn video 00:27:00 | weirder 00:28:00 | jacket sometimes 00:29:00 | play sports 00:31:00 | hairy ãƒâ¡ãƒâ¡ãƒâ¡ 00:32:00 | prejudiced, raccoons 00:33:00 | fearing wood, rabies 00:34:00 | rabies 00:35:00 | ultra platinum 00:36:00 | mods prepared 00:37:00 | regular monitor, doctor backwards, ssd 00:38:00 | plugs form factor 00:39:00 | monitor, my processor 00:40:00 | s came, k gaming, video card 00:41:00 | holy crap holy, good minute 00:43:00 | disease, data set, pandemic, deaths per 00:44:00 | versions plague, deadly, killed itself 00:45:00 | deadly, diseases, hours one, bellaire form 00:46:00 | marissa rolling, skin, leprosy comedy, schuylkill river 00:47:00 | bubonic, australia, scientific community 00:48:00 | eighteen hundreds, colonizing australia, people percent, good disease, malaria, deaths, paramos bars 00:49:00 | million people, south africa, deaths, every seconds 00:50:00 | pandemic, diseases, aids, thirty six point seven 00:51:00 | thirty six, million people, six point seven, black plague 00:54:00 | mobile silence, defends, ebola, t-cells, dendrites, immune system 00:55:00 | b-cell, one causes, ebola 00:56:00 | dendritic, immunity, cells 00:57:00 | malaria, immune system, ebola, crazy things, viruses, t-cells 00:58:00 | getting sent, viruses, whatever exploding 00:59:00 | cells, viruses, skin 01:00:00 | antibacterial, cells 01:01:00 | antibiotics, large tricks, antibacterial, cattle, pigs and pigs, flu, swine 01:02:00 | hospitals, story good 01:03:00 | spinal, bacteria, defends, skin, cells 01:04:00 | bacteria, resistant, virus, one level 01:05:00 | europe, recurrences, million people, every seconds, die pull 01:06:00 | mono 01:07:00 | mono, carrier, disease, immune system 01:08:00 | spread, death bubonic, stories tall 01:09:00 | disease, dead body 01:10:00 | dead bodies, evacuated every, dead body, disease, flu, virus, swine 01:11:00 | olympics, million people, hot topic, zika killed, disease 01:12:00 | wildfire, bird flu, death killed 01:13:00 | florida, one case, spread 01:14:00 | bacteria,
Views: 2 The UnPanderers
2014 Demystifying Medicine - Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections
 
01:48:41
Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections and What's Being Done About It Air date: Tuesday, January 07, 2014, 4:00:00 PM Runtime: 01:48:41 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Anthony Fauci, MD (NIAID) Jeffrey Taubenberger, MD, PhD (NIAID) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18222 Runtime: 01:41:10 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Mark Hoon, PhD (NIDCR) Irwin Arias, MD (NICHD/CC) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18231
Views: 550 nihvcast
Human microbiome | Wikipedia audio article
 
42:52
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiota 00:01:58 1 Terminology 00:02:37 2 Relative numbers 00:03:55 3 Study 00:06:50 3.1 Shotgun Sequencing 00:07:23 3.1.1 Collection of samples and DNA extraction 00:08:05 3.1.2 Preparation of the library and sequencing 00:08:36 3.1.3 Metagenome assembly 00:09:15 3.1.4 Contig binning 00:09:59 3.1.5 Analysis after the processing 00:10:53 3.2 Marker gene analysis 00:14:02 3.3 Phylogenetic Analysis 00:15:46 4 Types 00:15:55 4.1 Bacteria 00:18:34 4.2 Archaea 00:19:21 4.3 Fungi 00:19:53 4.4 Viruses 00:20:23 5 Anatomical areas 00:20:33 5.1 Skin 00:22:07 5.2 Conjunctiva 00:22:59 5.3 Gut 00:26:13 5.4 Urethra and bladder 00:27:04 5.5 Vagina 00:28:47 5.6 Placenta 00:29:08 5.7 Uterus 00:29:39 5.8 Oral cavity 00:33:24 5.9 Lung 00:35:06 5.10 Biliary tract 00:35:45 6 Disease and death 00:36:05 6.1 Cancer 00:39:00 6.2 Inflammatory bowel disease 00:39:36 6.3 Human immunodeficiency virus 00:40:51 6.4 Death 00:41:19 7 Environmental health 00:41:45 8 Migration 00:42:14 9 See also 00:42:23 10 Bibliography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.873621949970991 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The human microbiota is the aggregate of microorganisms that resides on or within any of a number of human tissues and biofluids, including the skin, mammary glands, placenta, seminal fluid, uterus, ovarian follicles, lung, saliva, oral mucosa, conjunctiva, biliary and gastrointestinal tracts. They include bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses. Though micro-animals can also live on the human body, they are typically excluded from this definition. The human microbiome refers specifically to the collective genomes of resident microorganisms.Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number. Some microorganisms that colonize humans are commensal, meaning they co-exist without harming humans; others have a mutualistic relationship with their human hosts. Conversely, some non-pathogenic microorganisms can harm human hosts via the metabolites they produce, like trimethylamine, which the human body converts to trimethylamine N-oxide via FMO3-mediated oxidation. Certain microorganisms perform tasks that are known to be useful to the human host but the role of most of them is not well understood. Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota.The Human Microbiome Project took on the project of sequencing the genome of the human microbiota, focusing particularly on the microbiota that normally inhabit the skin, mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina. It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published its initial results.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Narrow-spectrum antibiotic | Wikipedia audio article
 
57:26
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:03:32 1 Medical uses 00:05:46 1.1 Administration 00:07:37 1.2 Prevalence 00:08:25 2 Side-effects 00:10:11 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:11:30 3 Interactions 00:11:39 3.1 Birth control pills 00:14:05 3.2 Alcohol 00:15:36 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:17:07 4.1 Combination therapy 00:18:36 5 Classes 00:20:16 6 Production 00:21:47 7 Resistance 00:27:09 7.1 Misuse 00:33:00 8 History 00:33:47 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:37:10 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:43:25 9 Etymology 00:45:41 10 Research 00:45:50 10.1 Alternatives 00:46:38 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:47:46 10.3 Vaccines 00:48:46 10.4 Phage therapy 00:50:57 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:52:30 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7965739257543741 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic which means "opposing life", based on Greek roots, (ἀντι-) anti: "against" and (βίος-) biotic: "life", is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. There's evidence of antibiotic use since ancient times. Many civilizations used topical application of mouldy bread, with many references to its beneficial effects arising from ancient Egypt, China, Serbia, Greece and Rome. The first person to directly document the use of moulds to treat infections was John Parkinson (1567–1650). Antibiotics truly revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. Alexander Fleming (1881–1955) discovered modern day penicillin in 1928. After realizing the great potential there was in penicillin, Fleming pursued the challenge of how to market it and translate it to commercial use. With help from other biochemists, penicillin was finally available for widespread use. This was significantly beneficial during wartime. Unfortunately, it didn't take long for resistance to begin. Effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
Antibiotic | Wikipedia audio article
 
44:36
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:01:53 1 Medical uses 00:03:38 1.1 Administration 00:05:04 1.2 Prevalence 00:05:43 2 Side-effects 00:07:08 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:08:10 3 Interactions 00:08:19 3.1 Birth control pills 00:10:15 3.2 Alcohol 00:11:30 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:12:41 4.1 Combination therapy 00:13:52 5 Classes 00:15:13 6 Production 00:16:26 7 Resistance 00:20:38 7.1 Misuse 00:25:11 8 History 00:25:50 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:28:29 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:33:26 9 Etymology 00:35:15 10 Research 00:35:24 10.1 Alternatives 00:36:03 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:36:59 10.3 Vaccines 00:37:48 10.4 Phage therapy 00:39:32 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:40:45 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic (which means "opposing life", from New Latin based on ancient Greek roots) is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. However, their effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse, and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Antibiotics | Wikipedia audio article
 
56:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:02:27 1 Medical uses 00:04:38 1.1 Administration 00:06:27 1.2 Prevalence 00:07:15 2 Side-effects 00:09:00 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:10:19 3 Interactions 00:10:28 3.1 Birth control pills 00:12:54 3.2 Alcohol 00:14:27 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:15:55 4.1 Combination therapy 00:17:24 5 Classes 00:19:05 6 Production 00:20:35 7 Resistance 00:25:54 7.1 Misuse 00:31:41 8 History 00:32:27 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:35:50 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:42:08 9 Etymology 00:44:24 10 Research 00:44:33 10.1 Alternatives 00:45:21 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:46:30 10.3 Vaccines 00:47:30 10.4 Phage therapy 00:49:42 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:51:12 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.792802964542377 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic which means "opposing life", based on Greek roots, (ἀντι-) anti: "against" and (βίος-) biotic: "life", is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. However, their effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse, and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 13 wikipedia tts
Antibiotics | Wikipedia audio article
 
44:36
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:01:53 1 Medical uses 00:03:38 1.1 Administration 00:05:04 1.2 Prevalence 00:05:43 2 Side-effects 00:07:08 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:08:10 3 Interactions 00:08:19 3.1 Birth control pills 00:10:15 3.2 Alcohol 00:11:30 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:12:41 4.1 Combination therapy 00:13:52 5 Classes 00:15:13 6 Production 00:16:26 7 Resistance 00:20:38 7.1 Misuse 00:25:11 8 History 00:25:50 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:28:29 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:33:26 9 Etymology 00:35:15 10 Research 00:35:24 10.1 Alternatives 00:36:03 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:36:59 10.3 Vaccines 00:37:48 10.4 Phage therapy 00:39:32 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:40:45 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic (which means "opposing life", from New Latin based on ancient Greek roots) is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. However, their effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse, and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 31 wikipedia tts
Microbial ecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
11:19
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_ecology 00:01:28 1 History 00:03:11 2 Roles 00:04:25 3 Symbiosis 00:05:07 3.1 Mutualism 00:06:24 3.2 Amensalism 00:07:20 4 Microbial resource management 00:08:41 5 In built environment and human interaction 00:10:14 5.1 Antimicrobials 00:10:52 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9086618212029884 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Microbial ecology (or environmental microbiology) is the ecology of microorganisms: their relationship with one another and with their environment. It concerns the three major domains of life—Eukaryota, Archaea, and Bacteria—as well as viruses.Microorganisms, by their omnipresence, impact the entire biosphere. Microbial life plays a primary role in regulating biogeochemical systems in virtually all of our planet's environments, including some of the most extreme, from frozen environments and acidic lakes, to hydrothermal vents at the bottom of deepest oceans, and some of the most familiar, such as the human small intestine. As a consequence of the quantitative magnitude of microbial life (Whitman and coworkers calculated 5.0×1030 cells, eight orders of magnitude greater than the number of stars in the observable universe) microbes, by virtue of their biomass alone, constitute a significant carbon sink. Aside from carbon fixation, microorganisms' key collective metabolic processes (including nitrogen fixation, methane metabolism, and sulfur metabolism) control global biogeochemical cycling. The immensity of microorganisms' production is such that, even in the total absence of eukaryotic life, these processes would likely continue unchanged.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Antibiotic | Wikipedia audio article
 
52:42
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic 00:02:19 1 Medical uses 00:04:22 1.1 Administration 00:06:04 1.2 Prevalence 00:06:50 2 Side-effects 00:08:29 2.1 Correlation with obesity 00:09:43 3 Interactions 00:09:52 3.1 Birth control pills 00:12:08 3.2 Alcohol 00:13:36 4 Pharmacodynamics 00:15:00 4.1 Combination therapy 00:16:24 5 Classes 00:18:00 6 Production 00:19:26 7 Resistance 00:24:24 7.1 Misuse 00:29:48 8 History 00:30:32 8.1 Synthetic antibiotics derived from dyes 00:33:41 8.2 Penicillin and other natural antibiotics 00:39:33 9 Etymology 00:41:42 10 Research 00:41:51 10.1 Alternatives 00:42:37 10.2 Resistance and modifying agents 00:43:42 10.3 Vaccines 00:44:40 10.4 Phage therapy 00:46:43 10.5 Phytochemicals 00:48:08 10.6 New antibiotics development Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8275874393128875 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment and prevention of such infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. Sometimes, the term antibiotic which means "opposing life", based on Greek roots, (ἀντι-) anti: "against" and (βίος-) biotic: "life", is broadly used to refer to any substance used against microbes, but in the usual medical usage, antibiotics (such as penicillin) are those produced naturally (by one microorganism fighting another), whereas nonantibiotic antibacterials (such as sulfonamides and antiseptics) are fully synthetic. However, both classes have the same goal of killing or preventing the growth of microorganisms, and both are included in antimicrobial chemotherapy. "Antibacterials" include antiseptic drugs, antibacterial soaps, and chemical disinfectants, whereas antibiotics are an important class of antibacterials used more specifically in medicine and sometimes in livestock feed. Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. However, their effectiveness and easy access have also led to their overuse, and some bacteria have developed resistance. This has led to widespread problems, and the World Health Organization have classified antimicrobial resistance as a "serious threat [that] is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country".
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Environmental microbiology | Wikipedia audio article
 
10:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_ecology 00:01:18 1 History 00:02:50 2 Roles 00:03:55 3 Symbiosis 00:04:33 3.1 Mutualism 00:05:41 3.2 Amensalism 00:06:31 4 Microbial resource management 00:07:44 5 In built environment and human interaction 00:09:07 5.1 Antimicrobials 00:09:42 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Microbial ecology (or environmental microbiology) is the ecology of microorganisms: their relationship with one another and with their environment. It concerns the three major domains of life—Eukaryota, Archaea, and Bacteria—as well as viruses.Microorganisms, by their omnipresence, impact the entire biosphere. Microbial life plays a primary role in regulating biogeochemical systems in virtually all of our planet's environments, including some of the most extreme, from frozen environments and acidic lakes, to hydrothermal vents at the bottom of deepest oceans, and some of the most familiar, such as the human small intestine. As a consequence of the quantitative magnitude of microbial life (Whitman and coworkers calculated 5.0×1030 cells, eight orders of magnitude greater than the number of stars in the observable universe) microbes, by virtue of their biomass alone, constitute a significant carbon sink. Aside from carbon fixation, microorganisms' key collective metabolic processes (including nitrogen fixation, methane metabolism, and sulfur metabolism) control global biogeochemical cycling. The immensity of microorganisms' production is such that, even in the total absence of eukaryotic life, these processes would likely continue unchanged.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts